women wearing – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 18:22:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://imos-journal.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon.png women wearing – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ 32 32 The end of everything French Global Voices https://imos-journal.net/the-end-of-everything-french-global-voices/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 13:53:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/the-end-of-everything-french-global-voices/ Screenshot from a Youtube video showing the first veiled Algerian news anchor since independence from French occupation. This article was first published by Raseef22 on February 25, 2022. An edited version is republished through a partnership with Global Voices. For the first time in half a century, Algerians watched a a news anchor with a […]]]>

Screenshot from a Youtube video showing the first veiled Algerian news anchor since independence from French occupation.

This article was first published by Raseef22 on February 25, 2022. An edited version is republished through a partnership with Global Voices.

For the first time in half a century, Algerians watched a a news anchor with a headscarf gives a brief glimpse on state television on the morning of February 15, 2022. This was widely seen by Algerians as a historic event, after the station breached the restriction on wearing headscarves on public television.

Since the day Algeria gained independence from French occupation on July 5, 1962 and regained sovereignty over its radio and television buildings on October 28, 1962, Najwa Gedi is considered the first hijabi to present the bulletin of information.

Algerian TV presenter and main newscaster Said Toubal posted on his official Facebook page, saying:

For the first time after independence, Algerian public television gives a place to hijabi women in news bulletins, and its colleague Najwa Jedi shines brightly in her presentation.

Headscarves are prohibited

A member of the National Syndicate of Algerian Journalists (SNJ), Reda Jawadi, claims that Algerian television “has not allowed women wearing headgear to appear on screen for more than half a century since the restoration of full sovereignty over state radio and television despite the fact that Islam is the state religion.

Speaking to Raseef22, Jawadi said: “The mentality of banning the appearance of the headscarf on the screen is a mentality inherited from the orchestrators of this public institution, and there is no law inside the building. of the television station which prohibits the appearance of veiled women on the screen, but rather these are instructions inherited.

He added:

The headscarf was banned from television due to personal convictions and improvised decisions issued by the successive officials responsible for the management and management of Algerian state television since independence, and this of course, under the impetus successive governments very satisfied with this policy.

Reda Jawadi said: “The final stage of television marks the start of offering thousands of female graduates of the country’s media and communication schools and veiled women who aspire to appear in the media, the opportunity to work in the state television building on Al-Shuhada Street. , or at one of its regional institutions across the state”.

The female body on screen

Despite the restoration of French sovereignty over television and radio on October 28, 1962, Yamin Boudhan, a professor of media at Qatar University, argues in his comments to Raseef22 that all successive media and television decision makers ” have inherited European thought both in appearance and presentation.”

In their eyes, the headscarf is “a backward and uncivilized image, an idea inherited from French thought”, he said, citing French policies widely seen as intolerant of Muslim traditions and practices. He added that it is unfortunate that this way of thinking, which he described as “seeking to destroy the Algerian identity from the depths of Algerian society”, has continued for more than a year. half a century, even after independence.

In an interview with Raseef22, he went on to add that the promoted image of a female body “had been crucial to appearing on television, and it had been important to show important aspects of women as an image or reflection of civilization and in order to attract viewers, and this is what Algerian television has focused on throughout this period.

Veil? Don’t even dream of a job

According to Boudhan, this made the dream of hijabi women to work in Algerian public television “a far-fetched fantasy and a near impossibility, so that all women who graduated from media and communication departments in Algeria ended up working in the administration or education, and those who want to specialize in the field end up going to radio, news agencies and various newspapers.

Algerian journalist Sabah Boudras, who has been teaching in Sweden for more than four years, confirms that she “applied to work for Algerian public television, but her application was rejected during her first interview because of the hijab”.

In a statement to Raseef22, Boudras attests that:

The response was harsh and direct, and openly linked to the hijab with the words: “You want to work in the news department and present news bulletins… Don’t even dream of it because it won’t happen. If you want to work, you have to work in the Al-Qur’an Al-Kareem channel (Koranic television)’.

Sabah then adds: “I love newsletters, so how can I do to work in another sector, and why was it prohibited? Why are veiled women’s hopes and dreams of being creative and appearing in the media shattered and ruined by the official Algerian channel?

For this reason and for other reasons in the field of education in which she worked, Sabah Boudras decided to leave her native country and move to Sweden, where she currently works in the education sector and creates reports for Arab channels from there, and by On the other hand, the headscarf did not oppose any of this.

pull hijabis

Back in Algeria, a number of female journalists decided to wear the hijab on Algerian public television, but were prevented from presenting news and even non-news programs.

Naima Majer, an Algerian media personality, is the first Algerian television presenter to wear the hijab, specifically during the month of Ramadan in the year 1994. But then she was prevented from appearing on screen simply because she wore the hijab.

Naima Madjer said in an interview with Raseef22:

I was very pleased with the appearance of Najwa Jedi wearing the hijab on state television, a move we had been waiting for many years as the ban was the dominant position in the halls of the television station.

She adds that this appearance “takes us back to 1994 when I decided to wear the hijab. At that time, I was prevented from continuing my TV shows and interviews for which there was an audience, and I was content with administrative work inside the TV building. [Despite being taken off air]to this day, I have not regretted my decision to don the headscarf.

But, she says: “I relived the pain that veiled women in Algeria feel, every time I tried to fulfill their wish to present on public television. I am ready to resume presenting and broadcasting news following the television’s decision to lift the ban with the television appearance of hijabi presenter Najwa Jedi.

Many female journalists and media personalities from Algerian television have been suspended from appearing on screen because of the hijab, including Naima Madjer, Nassira Mazhoud, Iman Mahjoubi, Houria Harath and Sawsan ben Habib, according to Algerian platform Ouras. .

The appearance of the headscarf on the news bulletins of Algerian public television will give hope to media graduates and those who love journalistic work to be able to access this public media institution.

But there are also fears of other impromptu decisions that could come at any time to ban the hijab again, as long as the regulations are improvised and the decisions are arbitrary, without any real legal basis within the institution.

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We asked Muslim women why they wear the hijab while playing sports. Here’s what they told us https://imos-journal.net/we-asked-muslim-women-why-they-wear-the-hijab-while-playing-sports-heres-what-they-told-us/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 07:33:45 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/we-asked-muslim-women-why-they-wear-the-hijab-while-playing-sports-heres-what-they-told-us/ Jhe French Senate recently voted in favor of a bill to ban the wearing of the headscarf in sports competitions. Proponents of the legislation say the headscarf, or hijab, symbolizes Islamic radicalism, patriarchy and lack of female empowerment. Muslim female athletes and women’s rights activists condemned the bill, with one commentator calling it “gender Islamophobia”. […]]]>

Jhe French Senate recently voted in favor of a bill to ban the wearing of the headscarf in sports competitions. Proponents of the legislation say the headscarf, or hijab, symbolizes Islamic radicalism, patriarchy and lack of female empowerment.

Muslim female athletes and women’s rights activists condemned the bill, with one commentator calling it “gender Islamophobia”. Others pointed out how such laws have the potential to limit the inclusion of Muslim women in sport.

As researchers who study the inclusion of diversity in sport, we have conducted several studies looking at the sports participation of Muslim women over a three-year period. Our recent study, published in 2021, shows that many Muslim women want to wear a hijab when exercising, and they list many reasons for doing so.

Muslim women and sport

Muslim women’s participation in sports has remained historically lower than that of many other marginalized groups, such as indigenous groups and other racial minorities. This is particularly evident in socially conservative countries such as Saudi Arabia and Pakistan, where only a few women have competed in the Summer Olympics.

In recent years, however, more Muslim women have started playing sports, especially in Western countries. In general, there has been a boom in the sale of modest Islamic fashion wear and the hijab as fashion accessories.

In 2018, the global market for Muslim fashion wear was estimated at US$283 billion, with Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and Indonesia being the largest. This market is expected to reach $402 billion by 2024.

Various sports brands have introduced the hijab for sports to tap into this market. For example, Nike introduced a “Pro Hijab” in 2017. Several other companies, such as Ahida, LiaWear, and Asiya Sport, produced the sports hijab before Nike.

We wanted to explore what Muslim women said about wearing the hijab when participating in sports.

What the research shows

We used a three-study approach to collect the data. This means that we collected data through open-ended questions from 23 Muslim women living in the United States in the first study. Based on these results, we developed an online survey questionnaire and conducted a preliminary test with 282 women from 11 countries. We then revised our materials and conducted the final study with a sample of 347 Muslim women from 34 countries.

The women in our study were already wearing the hijab, so we asked them why they wanted to wear the hijab during sports. Among the reasons they listed were that the hijab allows them to adhere to their religious beliefs, is comfortable and gives them a sense of empowerment. One of the participants said: “The idea of ​​hijab is linked to the concept of freedom and human rights. For me, a hijab is a personal belief and ideology, and everyone has the right to follow it or not.

The influence of other people in their lives was also an important factor. For example, several participants reported that men or women in their family could influence their choice to wear the hijab.

We also found that the opinions of other Muslim women often influenced their decisions. For example, women were enthusiastic about shopping for sportswear when their friends had also done so.

However, some Muslim women have expressed fear of being harassed in Western countries when wearing the hijab in sports. For example, one participant said, “Sometimes other members of the community don’t accept a pro-sport hijab and treat the woman with a hijab differently. This can bring negative feelings to this woman, such as the fear of being judged and mistreated in society.

We argue that this fear of harassment resulting from wearing the hijab in sport in Western countries could be a major impediment to improving sport participation for Muslim women.

Other researchers have already found that for Muslim women, wearing the hijab during sporting activities can be empowering. Researchers have also argued that Muslim women view the hijab as part of their unique identity in various Western contexts. It should be noted that not all Muslim women wear the hijab.

Researchers have also previously reported that Muslim women’s modest sportswear buying behavior depends on social norms and cultural values. For example, the hijab was never worn in the Indian subcontinent. Therefore, many Muslim women in Pakistan and India practice sports without wearing hijab.

Advocates for banning or opposing the hijab in France should listen to the opinions of Muslim women who wish to wear the hijab in sport. If the voices of hijabi are not heard, it will further exclude Muslim women from sports participation.

Umer Hussain, Postdoctoral Research Associate, ADVANCE, Texas A&M University

George B. Cunningham, Professor of Sports Management, Texas A&M University

This article was republished from The Conversation. Read the original article here.


Read also : Muslim women must see that the burqa is like the chastity belt of the dark ages, writes Taslima Nasreen


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Melbourne joins growing list of anti-hijab protests around the world https://imos-journal.net/melbourne-joins-growing-list-of-anti-hijab-protests-around-the-world/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 04:15:50 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/melbourne-joins-growing-list-of-anti-hijab-protests-around-the-world/ Protesters stood outside the State Library of Victoria carrying signs saying ‘Save Women’s Rights in India’ and ‘Hijab – My Right, My Choice’. Several others carried posters that read “My life” and “The hijab is my right”. Hundreds of Indian Australians, many of whom are Muslim, staged a protest at the State Library of Victoria […]]]>

Protesters stood outside the State Library of Victoria carrying signs saying ‘Save Women’s Rights in India’ and ‘Hijab – My Right, My Choice’. Several others carried posters that read “My life” and “The hijab is my right”.

Hundreds of Indian Australians, many of whom are Muslim, staged a protest at the State Library of Victoria on Sunday against what they said was an unconstitutional ban on the right of Muslim students and teachers to wear the hijab .

This followed protests held Saturday in several US cities by several foreign organizations, including Native American civil rights groups and activists.

It all started in the southern Indian state of Karnataka, where Muslim female students were suddenly banned from entering their classroom wearing a hijab. Unfazed, six students continued their studies sitting outside their classrooms, which garnered the support of several international personalities.

Subsequently, a video of a group of Hindu men from Karnataka harassing a hijab-wearing Muslim student named Muskan, went viral on social media. It sparked protests from people around the world in support of the defiant girl who raised her fists and forced her way into college.

The program in Melbourne started with the recognition of the country followed by the Indian and Australian national anthems. Several female students from schools and universities were among those who addressed the rally.

University student Sara Fawadi called the ban “absolutely ridiculous, shameful and hypocritical because schools are meant to be a safe place of learning where generations are raised and they have been turned into a discriminatory environment where people are brainwashed into hating each other.”

Image: NRI Affairs

Gisella Ali, representing The Humanism Project, a secular Indian social justice group in Australia, said: “The Indian Constitution encourages plurality, protecting Indian citizens from any form of religious discrimination that we now see in action. Uniforms in schools are intended to minimize the differences between students of different and unequal economic classes. They are not intended to impose cultural uniformity on a plural country. This is why Sikhs are allowed to wear turbans not only in the classroom, but even in the police and the army. This is why Hindu students wear bindi/tilak/vibhuti with school and university uniforms without comment or controversy. Similarly, Muslim women should be able to wear the hijab with their uniform. »

“Women should be able to access education, employment and public spaces without being humiliated or punished for their clothes. We support every woman who is told she cannot enter her educational institution because she is wearing some form of clothing,” she added.

Activist Tanvi Mor said that although the hijab is not part of her culture or religion, she understood respect, dignity and tolerance; and what it means for a woman to have access to education as a basic right. “We have reached a stage where a dress code has become a matter of religion and has been given greater importance than a girl’s right to education without discrimination,” adding that the majority of the population should not have her say on the issue of a Muslim woman’s right. right to wear a hijab.

“We have fought a century-long battle to fight for women’s rights, let’s not set them back or become an obstacle to their progress. For a country to progress, the empowerment of women is essential in all sections of society. It cannot be seen in isolation, but rather a collective effort,” she said.

More protests are planned in other Australian and New Zealand cities in the coming days.

Support for these girls came from all corners of the globe.

Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai tweeted: “Refusing to let girls go to school in their hijab is horrifying. The objectification of women persists – to wear less or more. Indian leaders must end the marginalization of Muslim women.

The Goodwill Ambassador for International Religious Freedom (IRF) tweeted Feb. 11 that “religious freedom includes being able to choose one’s religious attire.”

“The Indian state of Karnataka should not determine the admissibility of religious attire. Banning hijab in schools violates religious freedom and stigmatizes and marginalizes women and girls,” Rashad Hussain said in the tweet.

In Europe, students and scholars from Erasmus University Rotterdam in The Hague have also issued a statement of solidarity. A statement from them reads: “Students have been targeted, brutalized and subjected to threats of Hindu majority intimidation and state-sponsored violence.”

“We unconditionally support acts of resistance by Muslim students and endorse these students’ demands to be granted their constitutional rights – freedom of expression, practice of their faith and access to education,” the statement said.

Prominent voices in South Africa have spoken out against the harassment of these students in Karnataka.

Ashwin Trikamjee, leader of South Africa’s Hindu Maha Sabha, said: “All cultures, including cultural practices and beliefs, should be respected by all,” she told South African news site IOL. News.

Arthi Nanackchand Shanand, the president of Arya Samaj in South Africa, told IOL that if the Karnataka institution specifies a particular dress code, students must adhere to it. However, she believed that Hindu men had no right to prevent Muslim women from wearing the hijab in class. “It does not concern them. This is a matter between the school administration and the students. As a Hindu priest (of the Vedic Purohit Mandal), I can safely say that our scriptures do not support patriarchy, on the contrary, they support the dignity and respect of all women.

Human Rights Watch, an international non-governmental organization headquartered in New York, posted a Tweet on Twitter saying that wearing the hijab should be a personal choice. Government-imposed restrictions on wearing the hijab in schools and colleges violate India’s obligations under international human rights law.

Some well-known personalities have also joined in denouncing this policy of banning Muslim girls from attending classes.

American model Bella Hadid, in a few powerful Instagram posts, called on people to stop discriminating against Muslim women. She urged countries to rethink the decisions they have made or are trying to make in the future regarding a body that is not theirs.

Screenshot 2022 02 21 at 14.03.19

French soccer star and Manchester United midfielder Paul Pogba has shared a video clip of protests featuring burqa-clad girls being harassed by boys in saffron headscarves. The 28-year-old footballer shared the clip, on his Instagram story with the caption: “Hindu mobs continue to harass Muslim girls wearing hijab at university in India.”

Sonny Bill Williams, current heavyweight boxer and former member of the New Zealand rugby team who won the World Cup twice, tweeted in support. He said: “These thugs may tear your headscarf from your head, but they will never tear Islam or Allah from your hearts. So stay strong sisters, send love and duas to yourselves and your families.

Follow NRI cases on Facebook and Twitter for the latest updates. Support us on Patreon.

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French Vogue slammed for glorifying Julia Fox headscarf amid hijab ban https://imos-journal.net/french-vogue-slammed-for-glorifying-julia-fox-headscarf-amid-hijab-ban/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 11:15:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-vogue-slammed-for-glorifying-julia-fox-headscarf-amid-hijab-ban/ Ever since French Vogue took to their Instagram account to share an image of Julia Fox wearing a headscarf, they’ve been under fire from critics. The image was captioned in a way that indicated the magazine praised Fox for wearing the headscarf. It is a known fact that France has several laws prohibiting Muslim women […]]]>

Ever since French Vogue took to their Instagram account to share an image of Julia Fox wearing a headscarf, they’ve been under fire from critics. The image was captioned in a way that indicated the magazine praised Fox for wearing the headscarf. It is a known fact that France has several laws prohibiting Muslim women from wearing the hijab.

On French Vogue’s Instagram, an image of Julia Fox wearing an all-black outfit was shared. They captioned the post, saying, “”Yes to the headscarf! Swipe left for your recap of @JuliaFox and @KayeWest’s style journey at the haute couture shows in Paris this week.”

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Fox was seen rocking a black leather jacket, a pair of black gloves, sunglasses and a black scarf. Fans and followers slammed Vogue for the post and their enthusiastic caption, calling the fashion bible “hypocritical”. One user wrote: “Yes to the headscarf”, but no to the hijab. Really smart.” Another user said, “How come she wears a headscarf and doesn’t get fined and has her headscarf ripped off or pulled on the streets of France…strange however… Oh wait, sorry, I forgot she’s not a Muslim.”

This user said: “Oh ok so if a white woman wears a headscarf it’s trendy but God forgot a Muslim woman of color wears it so you better ban it ? Give us a break.” Another added: “The double standard of praising her for wearing a headscarf in a country that actively prevents Muslim women from doing the same is so shameful.” One user even said, “not vogue FRANCE writing ‘yes to the headscarf’ as if that same country hadn’t banned a specific demographic from wearing it 😀

Offering some advice on how to manage their social media, this user said, “Please go back to high fashion, fashion, designer reporting rather than focusing on overexposed stars.” One blatantly asked, “How much is Kanye paying you?” After this backlash, the magazine spammed its feed with several posts to bury Julia Fox’s post. However, social media users on Twitter and Instagram were not ready to forget or forgive.

After senators approved the decision supporting the “removal of religious symbols”, the new amendment went into effect. The state explained why this was necessary saying, “Today there is legal uncertainty about the wearing of religious symbols, and it is necessary for the state to clearly define the rules. If the wearing of the veil is not explicitly prohibited, we could see the emergence of community sports clubs promoting certain religious symbols.

If you have an entertainment scoop or story for us, please contact us at (323) 421-7515

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French Muslim women slam Vogue’s offensive message https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-women-slam-vogues-offensive-message/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 07:29:51 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-women-slam-vogues-offensive-message/ TEHRAN (IQNA) — Vogue France has come under fire after posting a social media post that many users said was offensive to Muslim women amid increasingly public Islamophobia in France. Sharing a photo on Instagram on Friday of actress and model Julia Fox wearing a piece of fabric wrapped around her head, the outlet captioned […]]]>

TEHRAN (IQNA) — Vogue France has come under fire after posting a social media post that many users said was offensive to Muslim women amid increasingly public Islamophobia in France.

Sharing a photo on Instagram on Friday of actress and model Julia Fox wearing a piece of fabric wrapped around her head, the outlet captioned it “yes to the headscarf.”

The caption has since been edited to remove that line, but Vogue France did not acknowledge the change.

The photo was released as part of a montage featuring Fox and her boyfriend, rapper Kanye West, during Haute Couture Fashion Week in Paris. Two of the photos showed West wearing a balaclava through which only his eyes were visible.

“Yes to the headscarf – those few words were so simple,” French-Moroccan model and activist Hanan Houachmi told CNN via video call. “Yet we have begged, waited and fantasized about the day we will hear them, for us as hijabi women.”

Houachmi said the hijab had been “reduced to a mere accessory”, with Fox, who is white and non-Muslim, able to wear a headscarf as part of a “trend”, while the hijab, according to Houachmi, is seen by the French government as “the uniform of terrorists”.

In 2011, France became the first country in Europe to ban all face-covering clothing in public spaces, including balaclavas, masks, burqas and niqabs. Several other countries, including Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Denmark, followed with their own bans, partial bans and local bans on face coverings.

Last week, the French Senate also voted to ban the hijab for female athletes, although the measure now has to be voted on in France’s lower house. President Emmanuel Macron and his party oppose the ban. And last year a decision to ban anyone under the age of 18 from wearing the hijab in public was rejected by members of the National Assembly.

Many users cited Vogue’s choice of words under these circumstances as particularly insensitive for the French edition, given politicians’ efforts to crack down on the hijab, niqab and burqa.

CNN contacted Vogue France for comment but did not immediately receive a response.

“It’s almost funny, to be honest, because they make fun of us, insult us and reduce us to objects,” 18-year-old Chaïma Benaicha, who lives in northeastern France, told CNN via Twitter messages. “But when it’s a white woman doing it and not a Muslim, it’s trendy and something new in fashion even if wearing the hijab is not something you do to please people.”

Benaicha, who started wearing the hijab at the age of 14, said she received racist and Islamophobic comments at first, and told CNN she found it strange that wearing the niqab was “frowned upon” then that wearing a balaclava is “stylish” and “aesthetically pleasing to people.”

“People have tried to take my hijab off in the street many times. I find it inhumane,” Sarah, an 18-year-old French Muslim who wouldn’t give her last name, told CNN via messages. Twitter.

Sarah, a convert to Islam who lives in the commune of Évian-les-Bains in southeastern France and started wearing the hijab four months ago, said the Vogue caption France was “racist” and “shameful”, adding: “there is no other word for it.”

The furor that accompanied France’s proposed hijab ban for minors last year – as well as for mothers accompanying children on school trips – has also led to international awareness of anti-Muslim sentiment in France.

“I think it’s very indicative of the general type of thinking in France when it comes to the headscarf and Islam,” British writer and journalist Aisha Rimi said in a video call, adding that she was irritated by the lack of “tone recognition” by Vogue France. deafness of the post.”

Citing the example of Kim Kardashian’s Met Gala outfit, which covered her entire face and was head-to-toe black, Rimi said the reality star was “praised” for her innovative look while “women Muslim women who wear burkas are constantly vilified and dehumanized”. .”

“I can think of other hijab-wearing Muslim women who are also models that they could have used the same caption for, but that would never have been the case,” Rimi told CNN of Vogue’s remarks. France.

Houachmi – who is one such model, having previously appeared on the cover of Grazia Arabia wearing a hijab – said she found it encouraging that many of those who spoke about the legend did not wear a hijab and were often not Muslim, but that Vogue France still had “a long way to go” in terms of representing women wearing the hijab.

“When you turn the pages of a Vogue France, it doesn’t reflect the France of today,” she said. “That’s my problem with that.”

Source: CNN

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Grenoble street art festival in France loses funding over hijab-wearing mural https://imos-journal.net/grenoble-street-art-festival-in-france-loses-funding-over-hijab-wearing-mural/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 17:26:28 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/grenoble-street-art-festival-in-france-loses-funding-over-hijab-wearing-mural/ A street art piece, which depicted a woman wearing a blue striped hijab, cost its grants to a street art festival in the French city of Grenoble. A street art festival in the French mountain town of Grenoble has had its funding suspended by the regional authority over a mural of a woman wearing the […]]]>

A street art piece, which depicted a woman wearing a blue striped hijab, cost its grants to a street art festival in the French city of Grenoble.

A street art festival in the French mountain town of Grenoble has had its funding suspended by the regional authority over a mural of a woman wearing the Islamic hijab, according to French media The Dauphine.

Authorities in France’s Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region claimed the mural of women wearing hijabs was “provocative” and “unacceptable”.

They claimed that showing the image fueled violence and hatred, and only benefited “extremists”.

In the artwork, titled “Bad Religion?”, a woman can be seen wearing a blue striped hijab, evoking the uniforms that Jews in Nazi concentration camps were forced to wear, and a yellow beginning of David, with the word “Muslim” written on it, once again bringing to mind fond memories of the Nazi persecution of Jews.

The artist responsible for the street art is an anonymous character, who is called ‘Goin’.

Festival director Jerome Catz said the artist wanted the mural to draw attention to the fact that some people face discrimination because of their religious beliefs.

Catz said he believed the reason for the decision to withhold €10,000 funding was “purely political” and related to France’s upcoming presidential election, scheduled for April.

The work was defaced after the announcement of the decision to suspend subsidies. Black paint was used to cover the women’s faces and the beginning of David.

French politicians and the French government have recently stepped up pressure against France’s Muslim community, raiding mosques and Islamic foundations and proposing to implement an “anti-separatism” law, which would impose restrictions on the minority French.

A French presidential candidate, Eric Zemmour, as well as the infamous Marine Le Pen, have both spread hatred against Muslims, with the former being found guilty by a court of racist hate speech.

The Grenoble Street Art Festival takes place from January 21 to March 19.

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French senators vote to ban the hijab in sports competitions | Religion News https://imos-journal.net/french-senators-vote-to-ban-the-hijab-in-sports-competitions-religion-news/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 15:16:38 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-senators-vote-to-ban-the-hijab-in-sports-competitions-religion-news/ The amendment proposed by a right-wing group passed with 160 votes to 143. The French Senate has voted in favor of banning the wearing of the hijab in sports competitions, arguing that neutrality is a requirement on the playing field. The French legislative upper chamber voted Tuesday evening in favor of an amendment to a […]]]>

The amendment proposed by a right-wing group passed with 160 votes to 143.

The French Senate has voted in favor of banning the wearing of the hijab in sports competitions, arguing that neutrality is a requirement on the playing field.

The French legislative upper chamber voted Tuesday evening in favor of an amendment to a bill stipulating that the wearing of “ostentatious religious symbols is prohibited” to participate in events and competitions organized by sports federations.

In their text, the senators clearly stated that the amendment aims to prohibit “the wearing of the veil in sports competitions”. They added that the scarves can endanger the safety of the athletes who wear them when practicing their discipline.

The amendment, proposed by the right-wing group Les Républicains and opposed by the French government, was adopted by 160 votes in favor and 143 against. A committee made up of members of the Senate and lower house is now expected to meet to find a compromise on the text before it is published, which means the amendment can still be deleted.

It is unclear whether the ban would be implemented for the 2024 Paris Olympics. The Olympic organizing committee did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqjuayqn4os

The vote came a year after lawmakers in the lower house of the French parliament approved a bill to strengthen surveillance of mosques, schools and sports clubs in a bid to protect France from “radical Islamists” and to promote “respect for French values” – one of President Emmanuel Macron’s historic projects.

France has been hit by several attacks in recent years. But critics also see the law as a political ploy to lure the right to Macron’s centrist party ahead of this year’s presidential election.

In their amendment, Senators declared that all citizens are free to practice their religion, but insisted that we refrain from highlighting their differences.

“Today, there is legal uncertainty about the wearing of religious symbols, and it is necessary for the State to clearly define the rules”, reads the amendment voted by the senators. “If the wearing of the veil is not explicitly prohibited, we could see the emergence of community sports clubs promoting certain religious symbols.”

The French Football Federation already prohibits women from wearing the hijab in official matches, as well as in competitions it organizes.

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“Islamophobia and Stereotypes” The challenges facing the Muslim community in Kent https://imos-journal.net/islamophobia-and-stereotypes-the-challenges-facing-the-muslim-community-in-kent/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/islamophobia-and-stereotypes-the-challenges-facing-the-muslim-community-in-kent/ [ad_1] At the end of Islamophobia Awareness Month, the challenges facing the Muslim community in Kent were highlighted. The month-long campaign aimed to raise awareness of the threats of Islamophobic hate crimes and challenge stereotypes surrounding Islam to enable a better understanding of religion. Muslim adviser Naushabah Khan, who represents Medway, said the growing trend […]]]>


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At the end of Islamophobia Awareness Month, the challenges facing the Muslim community in Kent were highlighted.

The month-long campaign aimed to raise awareness of the threats of Islamophobic hate crimes and challenge stereotypes surrounding Islam to enable a better understanding of religion.

Muslim adviser Naushabah Khan, who represents Medway, said the growing trend towards Islamophobia must be tackled, starting with education.

READ MORE: Most refugees crossing the Channel legally seek and get asylum, study finds

She said: “There is usually a lack of understanding of how different communities live their lives, and I think that sometimes creates fear, which is where we see some of these difficult behaviors manifest.



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“There are clearly challenges that exist around understanding Islam, how it manifests itself, and I think we have seen a growing trend towards Islamophobia in recent years, which needs to be tackled, especially in the Kent. “

The adviser believes that acts such as the ban on the burqa in France and Prime Minister Boris Johnson comparing women wearing the burqa to “letterboxes” have led to an increase in Islamophobia.

She added: “There are many reasons why Kent is often faced with challenges, which can sometimes manifest as communities turning against communities.

“When we see terrorist attacks, which people claim to be in the name of Islam or the perpetrators claim to be in the name of Islam – this level of tension between communities has certainly been a factor. I think there is a general lack of understanding of what Islam is.



Prime Minister Boris Johnson
Prime Minister Boris Johnson

Kent Police recorded an offense in which Islamophobia was a factor as a religious hate crime “according to the circumstances”.

“I honestly think the police can always do more about this,” said Cllr Khan. “I think they’ve done a lot of work on hate crimes in general. So I think it’s very helpful, but with the specifics of religion, and how they identify Islamophobia, I don’t know.

“And actually, if I look at the company’s website and you type Islamophobia, the first thing that comes up is how to report possible terrorist activity.

“So again, I don’t think that kind of a relationship that you have to have with the Muslim community for us to somehow trust the police on this particular issue, maybe doesn’t exist and I think it’s something that needs building. “

“No one deserves to be the victim of a hate crime”

Detective Chief Superintendent Coretta Hine of the Kent Police Diversity and Inclusion Command has said tackling hate crime is a priority for Kent Police.

She said: “The new Diversity and Inclusion Command has developed a 2021-2024 Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, part of which includes identifying and supporting cultural campaigns.

“The campaign schedule is under development and will be constantly revised. We have started working with the National Muslim Police Association to recognize future initiatives.

“While awareness campaigns are extremely important, diversity and inclusion are central to the daily activities, thinking and behavior of the police. Embracing diversity is a constant theme within Kent Police, with all officers and staff receiving ongoing development and training on the subject. . “

In October, Kent Police supported Hate Crime Awareness Week, a nationwide campaign involving all UK police forces and coordinated by the National Council of Chiefs of Police.

As part of the week, their community liaison officers organized roadshows and events at local police stations to educate staff. The tours also included Black History Month, World Mental Health Day and National Inclusion Week.

She said: “As a force, we align the majority of our campaigns with the National Council of Chiefs of Police. UK Policing is done by consent and Kent Police seek to engage positively with all of our communities, and in doing so, we regularly show our support by engaging in national and international events and religious festivals throughout the ‘year.

“No one deserves to be the victim of a hate crime and we will continue to work with partner agencies and communities to promote a better understanding of this type of hate crime and remind people of the many ways it can be reported. “

For more stories about where you live, visit InYourZone.

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Campaign to promote diversity forced by France to remove the image of the hijab https://imos-journal.net/campaign-to-promote-diversity-forced-by-france-to-remove-the-image-of-the-hijab/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 18:38:06 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/campaign-to-promote-diversity-forced-by-france-to-remove-the-image-of-the-hijab/ [ad_1] The campaign aims to stand up for diversity and tackle hate speech and discrimination against Muslim women wearing headscarves – but it hasn’t even been able to publish an image of a hijab. The Council of Europe has produced posters of a woman wearing a hijab as part of an online campaign launched on […]]]>


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The campaign aims to stand up for diversity and tackle hate speech and discrimination against Muslim women wearing headscarves – but it hasn’t even been able to publish an image of a hijab.

The Council of Europe has produced posters of a woman wearing a hijab as part of an online campaign launched on October 28 to promote diversity among women and respect for Muslims wearing headscarves.

This decision came after a general outcry from French public and political figures who find the campaign and its posters which implicate women wearing the hijab as “deeply shocking”.

The online campaign, co-funded by the European Union, was the result of two online workshops tenuous in September by the partnership between the Anti-Discrimination Service of the Council of Europe and the Forum of European Organizations of Young Muslims and Students (FEMYSO).

“This specific collaboration was in the form of online workshops with the aim of developing human rights-based narratives with various participants to counter anti-Muslim hate speech,” said Hande Taner, president. elected from FEMYSO to TRT World while indicating their long-standing relationship with the board given their work in favor of minorities in Europe.

The Council of Europe has posted posters on social media to raise awareness of ending discrimination against Muslim women.

The images tweeted involve various images of women in hijabs with slogans that read “Beauty is in diversity, like freedom is in the hijab”, and “My scarf, my choice”.

However, the awareness campaign backfired and was condemned in France.

“This has met with backlash due to the pressure created by the poisoned narrative around Muslims online by prominent French politicians, diplomats and lecturers,” Taner said.

Pressure

Far-right expert Eric Zemmour criticized the campaign, saying “Islam is the enemy of freedom. This campaign is the enemy of truth,” on his social media account.

Far-right leader Marine Le Pen, President Macron’s main opponent in the upcoming elections, has also reacted to the campaign.

“This European campaign to promote the Islamist veil is scandalous and indecent at a time when millions of women courageously fight against this enslavement”, she declared.

“It is when women take off their veils that they become free, and not the other way around,” she added.

“Remembering that women are free to wear the hijab is one thing”, noted French Socialist Senator Laurence Rossignol.

“But to say that freedom is in the hijab is another. It is to promote it. Is this the role of the Council of Europe?

For her part, the French Minister of Youth, Sarah El Hairy, revealed that one of the posters had deeply shocked her because she believed that the campaign encouraged the wearing of the headscarf.

“This is the opposite of the values ​​that France defends … France has clearly expressed its very strong disapproval of the campaign, which is why it was withdrawn today,” she added in an interview on French television last week.

On October 6, following France’s request and the backlash, the Council of Europe announced that it was removing campaign publications while seeking “a better presentation of this project”.

The council also said that the aim of the campaign, which is part of a project within the European Union (EU), is to raise awareness about respecting diversity and combating all forms of discourse by hatred.

“The campaign is in line with the values ​​and priorities of the Council of Europe and the institutions of the European Union, which also defend human rights and against hate speech,” said Taner, stressing that ‘as a member state of the two organizations, France should better adhere to the collective European values ​​of human rights.

“French Islamophobic harassment”

Hence the question: what values ​​does France defend?

Rayan Freschi, researcher at CAGE, explains that France has been an ideological laboratory of the West for centuries.

“Its political and philosophical framework is clearly not tolerant and inclusive: deep systemic racism has always been part of the DNA of the French Republic,” Freschi told TRT World while adding that Islamophobia in France is now state sponsored.

According to Freschi, France’s ideological structure – based on the Republic and secularism (secularism) is inherently fanatical towards normative religious beliefs and practices.

Hijab in this regard is the most controversial – and even rejected.

Therefore, this mindset paved the way for government pressure on the council to cancel its campaign.

Yasser Louati, a French human rights and civil liberties activist, told TRT World that French outrage comes as no surprise and it only further undermines the very notions of the Council of Europe than are human rights and civil liberties.

France has again proven that it has been the laboratory of Islamophobia which tries to normalize this open hostility to the visibility of Muslims in the public space. And this decision by France further confirms that the country’s hostility towards Muslims is not a hoax, ” Louati said while adding that it is a reality for millions of Muslim women.

“Basically, we are witnessing French Islamophobic bullying,” he added.

Previously, the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo’s cartoons has been the subject of worldwide controversy by posting anti-Muslim cartoons involving depictions of the Prophet Muhammad, a move considered an insult to Islam.

(Maxim Shemetov / Reuters)

In response to widespread condemnation, France speech around the concepts of democracy and freedom of expression. However, regarding this recent campaign that cherishes freedom for Muslim headscarves, a different rhetoric has been adopted.

Yasser argues that the French conception of freedom contains double standards and is hypocritical when it goes against mainstream discourse.

You have freedom of speech when you dehumanize Muslims, when you make fun of blacks or immigrants. But we cannot make fun of Emmanuel Macron who pursues anyone who criticizes him or makes fun of him, ” he said.

Yasser draws attention to the anti-separatism bill approved by the French National Assembly which risks stigmatizing minorities.

“This anti-separatism law allows the government to shut down any organization on the basis of political disagreement,” he said, stressing that France further strengthens its position as leader of the normalization of Islamophobia in relation to the other western countries.

Paradoxical universality

Considering European values ​​in the context of freedom, democracy and the rule of law, Yasser indicates that these values ​​tend to be circumstantial in France.

Restricting efforts to build human rights-based narratives to combat discrimination raises the question of the universality of concepts of Liberty egality and fraternity which lay the historical foundations of France.

“French universalism is the ideological justification for its past colonial imperialism,” Freschi said while adding that the current French approach to Islam and Muslims is very much in line with its past. colonial.

In fact, he claims that for France, those who do not live by this worldview, like French Muslims, are deemed regressive and are simply not free – and this illustrates the paradoxical structure of French values ​​in the face of liberalism.

According to Yasser, France believes it can teach other countries abroad what they should and should not do in terms of human rights and civil liberties.

“But the current repression only shows that France is not a democracy as it claims it is,” he said, stressing that France should hold a mirror.

In this context, Taner argues that Muslims in France are exposed to one-sided freedom and the removal of campaign imagery is clear evidence of this.

In trying to silence this campaign of positivity and change, France is not just normalizing and legislating for anti-Muslim hatred in France, it is now exporting this culture of limiting freedom of expression to the rest of Europe. ”

According to her, despite French claims that her freedom applies to everyone, Muslims are not seen as equal or deserving of freedom.

“Any country that actively limits freedom of expression and restricts the rights of religious minorities is in fact not in line with European values ​​and violates fundamental rights.”

Source: TRT World


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European diversity campaign celebrating Hijab ended after French backlash https://imos-journal.net/european-diversity-campaign-celebrating-hijab-ended-after-french-backlash/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 16:00:44 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/european-diversity-campaign-celebrating-hijab-ended-after-french-backlash/ [ad_1] (RNS) – A diversity campaign designed to fight discrimination against European Muslim women who wear the hijab has been halted after triggering a backlash in France. The Council of Europe, an intergovernmental human rights organization, said its campaign grew out of efforts by Muslim youth organizations in Europe to strengthen respect for Muslim women […]]]>


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(RNS) – A diversity campaign designed to fight discrimination against European Muslim women who wear the hijab has been halted after triggering a backlash in France.

The Council of Europe, an intergovernmental human rights organization, said its campaign grew out of efforts by Muslim youth organizations in Europe to strengthen respect for Muslim women amid Islamophobia. growing. “Celebrate diversity and respect the hijab,” read a slogan, promoted under the hashtag # WECAN4HRS. Another image shared online featured a European woman of African descent with the slogan “My scarf, my choice.”

But in France, where face coverings such as the burqa and niqab were banned in public places in 2010, protests against the campaign were swift.

“This must be condemned and because of this France has clearly expressed its extremely strong disapproval and the campaign has therefore been withdrawn as of today,” said Sarah El Haïry, Secretary of State for Youth of the Ministry of Education. The French government lodged an official protest with the Council of Europe ahead of the campaign.

Earlier this year, an institution of the European Union ruled that European companies could prohibit women from wearing the hijab under certain circumstances.

A Council of Europe spokesperson told the BBC that the organization had deleted the campaign’s tweets, “while we reflect on a better presentation of the project.”

“The tweets reflected statements made by individual participants in one of the project’s workshops and do not represent the point of view of the Council of Europe or its Secretary General, Marija Pejcinovic Buric,” the spokesperson said. .

As the French presidential elections are scheduled, far-right politicians and potential candidates have taken hold of the campaign.


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Political commentator Eric Zemmour, a potential presidential candidate and immigration hawk, called the campaign “a veil of Europeans”. And Marie Le Pen, a former presidential candidate for the far-right National Rally, called the campaign “scandalous and indecent”. Although Le Pen is no longer leading the party, she remains a member of the National Assembly and an influential politician.

The slogans and the campaign were born out of two online workshops held in September and organized in collaboration with the Forum of European Muslim Youth and Student Organizations, a group that represents 33 different youth organizations in 20 European countries and has worked with the Council of Europe for more than 10 years.

“Everyone should be free to wear whatever they want. Muslim women are not allowed to wear the hijab and are excluded from the workplace and education, ”FEMYSO said in a series of tweets, noting that the individual rights of Muslim women across Europe are in jeopardy. and taking note of a recent reported case in the Spanish city of Guadalajara, where a local student was told she should take off her hijab or quit school.

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