wearing hijab – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 21:39:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://imos-journal.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon.png wearing hijab – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ 32 32 The end of everything French Global Voices https://imos-journal.net/the-end-of-everything-french-global-voices/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 13:53:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/the-end-of-everything-french-global-voices/ Screenshot from a Youtube video showing the first veiled Algerian news anchor since independence from French occupation. This article was first published by Raseef22 on February 25, 2022. An edited version is republished through a partnership with Global Voices. For the first time in half a century, Algerians watched a a news anchor with a […]]]>

Screenshot from a Youtube video showing the first veiled Algerian news anchor since independence from French occupation.

This article was first published by Raseef22 on February 25, 2022. An edited version is republished through a partnership with Global Voices.

For the first time in half a century, Algerians watched a a news anchor with a headscarf gives a brief glimpse on state television on the morning of February 15, 2022. This was widely seen by Algerians as a historic event, after the station breached the restriction on wearing headscarves on public television.

Since the day Algeria gained independence from French occupation on July 5, 1962 and regained sovereignty over its radio and television buildings on October 28, 1962, Najwa Gedi is considered the first hijabi to present the bulletin of information.

Algerian TV presenter and main newscaster Said Toubal posted on his official Facebook page, saying:

For the first time after independence, Algerian public television gives a place to hijabi women in news bulletins, and its colleague Najwa Jedi shines brightly in her presentation.

Headscarves are prohibited

A member of the National Syndicate of Algerian Journalists (SNJ), Reda Jawadi, claims that Algerian television “has not allowed women wearing headgear to appear on screen for more than half a century since the restoration of full sovereignty over state radio and television despite the fact that Islam is the state religion.

Speaking to Raseef22, Jawadi said: “The mentality of banning the appearance of the headscarf on the screen is a mentality inherited from the orchestrators of this public institution, and there is no law inside the building. of the television station which prohibits the appearance of veiled women on the screen, but rather these are instructions inherited.

He added:

The headscarf was banned from television due to personal convictions and improvised decisions issued by the successive officials responsible for the management and management of Algerian state television since independence, and this of course, under the impetus successive governments very satisfied with this policy.

Reda Jawadi said: “The final stage of television marks the start of offering thousands of female graduates of the country’s media and communication schools and veiled women who aspire to appear in the media, the opportunity to work in the state television building on Al-Shuhada Street. , or at one of its regional institutions across the state”.

The female body on screen

Despite the restoration of French sovereignty over television and radio on October 28, 1962, Yamin Boudhan, a professor of media at Qatar University, argues in his comments to Raseef22 that all successive media and television decision makers ” have inherited European thought both in appearance and presentation.”

In their eyes, the headscarf is “a backward and uncivilized image, an idea inherited from French thought”, he said, citing French policies widely seen as intolerant of Muslim traditions and practices. He added that it is unfortunate that this way of thinking, which he described as “seeking to destroy the Algerian identity from the depths of Algerian society”, has continued for more than a year. half a century, even after independence.

In an interview with Raseef22, he went on to add that the promoted image of a female body “had been crucial to appearing on television, and it had been important to show important aspects of women as an image or reflection of civilization and in order to attract viewers, and this is what Algerian television has focused on throughout this period.

Veil? Don’t even dream of a job

According to Boudhan, this made the dream of hijabi women to work in Algerian public television “a far-fetched fantasy and a near impossibility, so that all women who graduated from media and communication departments in Algeria ended up working in the administration or education, and those who want to specialize in the field end up going to radio, news agencies and various newspapers.

Algerian journalist Sabah Boudras, who has been teaching in Sweden for more than four years, confirms that she “applied to work for Algerian public television, but her application was rejected during her first interview because of the hijab”.

In a statement to Raseef22, Boudras attests that:

The response was harsh and direct, and openly linked to the hijab with the words: “You want to work in the news department and present news bulletins… Don’t even dream of it because it won’t happen. If you want to work, you have to work in the Al-Qur’an Al-Kareem channel (Koranic television)’.

Sabah then adds: “I love newsletters, so how can I do to work in another sector, and why was it prohibited? Why are veiled women’s hopes and dreams of being creative and appearing in the media shattered and ruined by the official Algerian channel?

For this reason and for other reasons in the field of education in which she worked, Sabah Boudras decided to leave her native country and move to Sweden, where she currently works in the education sector and creates reports for Arab channels from there, and by On the other hand, the headscarf did not oppose any of this.

pull hijabis

Back in Algeria, a number of female journalists decided to wear the hijab on Algerian public television, but were prevented from presenting news and even non-news programs.

Naima Majer, an Algerian media personality, is the first Algerian television presenter to wear the hijab, specifically during the month of Ramadan in the year 1994. But then she was prevented from appearing on screen simply because she wore the hijab.

Naima Madjer said in an interview with Raseef22:

I was very pleased with the appearance of Najwa Jedi wearing the hijab on state television, a move we had been waiting for many years as the ban was the dominant position in the halls of the television station.

She adds that this appearance “takes us back to 1994 when I decided to wear the hijab. At that time, I was prevented from continuing my TV shows and interviews for which there was an audience, and I was content with administrative work inside the TV building. [Despite being taken off air]to this day, I have not regretted my decision to don the headscarf.

But, she says: “I relived the pain that veiled women in Algeria feel, every time I tried to fulfill their wish to present on public television. I am ready to resume presenting and broadcasting news following the television’s decision to lift the ban with the television appearance of hijabi presenter Najwa Jedi.

Many female journalists and media personalities from Algerian television have been suspended from appearing on screen because of the hijab, including Naima Madjer, Nassira Mazhoud, Iman Mahjoubi, Houria Harath and Sawsan ben Habib, according to Algerian platform Ouras. .

The appearance of the headscarf on the news bulletins of Algerian public television will give hope to media graduates and those who love journalistic work to be able to access this public media institution.

But there are also fears of other impromptu decisions that could come at any time to ban the hijab again, as long as the regulations are improvised and the decisions are arbitrary, without any real legal basis within the institution.

]]>
French Supreme Court sets precedent banning Muslim lawyers from wearing hijab https://imos-journal.net/french-supreme-court-sets-precedent-banning-muslim-lawyers-from-wearing-hijab/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 17:15:50 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-supreme-court-sets-precedent-banning-muslim-lawyers-from-wearing-hijab/ Sarah Asmeta, a 30-year-old Franco-Syrian lawyer who has challenged the rule set by the Lille Bar Association, says she plans to take her fight to the European Court of Human Rights. The case was brought by Sarah Asmeta, a 30-year-old Franco-Syrian lawyer wearing the hijab. (Reuters) France’s highest court has decided to uphold the ban […]]]>

Sarah Asmeta, a 30-year-old Franco-Syrian lawyer who has challenged the rule set by the Lille Bar Association, says she plans to take her fight to the European Court of Human Rights.

The case was brought by Sarah Asmeta, a 30-year-old Franco-Syrian lawyer wearing the hijab. (Reuters)

France’s highest court has decided to uphold the ban on lawyers wearing the hijab and other religious symbols in courtrooms in the north of the country.

Wednesday’s decision was the first of its kind to set a precedent for the rest of the country.

The display of religious symbols is a moving topic in France and the court’s ruling could spark a national debate over so-called core Republican values ​​of secularism and identity ahead of the April presidential election.

The case was brought by Sarah Asmeta, a 30-year-old French-Syrian hijab-wearing lawyer, who challenged a rule established by the Council of the Bar of Lille which prohibits religious markers in its courtrooms on the grounds that it was discriminatory.

In its judgment, the Court of Cassation said the ban was “necessary and appropriate, on the one hand to preserve the independence of the lawyer and, on the other hand, to guarantee the right to a fair trial”.

Banning the wearing of religious symbols “does not constitute discrimination”, he added.

READ MORE: Women in France seek to end ‘humiliation’ against hijab in sport

Disappointed

Asmeta told Reuters she was shocked and disappointed by the decision.

“Why does covering my hair prevent my client from qualifying for a free trial? she told Reuters. “My clients are not children. If they choose me as a lawyer, with my veil, it is their choice.”

No law explicitly states that Asmeta cannot wear her hijab, a headscarf worn by some Muslim women, in the courtroom.

In the months following her swearing in and entry into law as a trainee lawyer, the Lille Bar adopted its own internal regulations prohibiting any sign of political, philosophical and religious belief from being worn with the robe in court.

Political change

Asmeta challenged the Lille bar rule, calling it targeted and discriminatory. She lost the case in an appeals court in 2020 and took the case to the Court of Cassation.

Religious symbols and clothing are prohibited for officials in France because of its principle of “laïcité”, or laïcité – the separation of religion from the state.

French lawmakers and politicians have sought in recent years to extend restrictions on wearing the hijab to cover, for example, mothers accompanying their children on school trips and football players.

In the run-up to a presidential election in April, right-wing candidates focused on identity issues.

READ MORE: Labeling political identity with Islam fuels Islamophobia: Austrian academic

Asmeta said she plans to take her fight to the European Court of Human Rights.

The case has caused heated debate within the legal community.

More than three dozen lawyers in Paris, where the bar has imposed a similar ban, penned an open letter on Monday calling for a nationwide rule against head coverings in courtrooms.

“We lawyers do not want a community and obscurantist justice,” they wrote in the French publication Marianne.

Slim Ben Achour, a discrimination lawyer, disagreed and said such bans were hypocritical.

“It’s not possible that we lawyers, advocates, or at least that’s how we market ourselves, are blocking Muslim women [from practising]“, he told Reuters.

Source: TRTWorld and agencies

]]>
French court upholds ban on lawyers wearing hijab in Lille courtrooms https://imos-journal.net/french-court-upholds-ban-on-lawyers-wearing-hijab-in-lille-courtrooms/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-court-upholds-ban-on-lawyers-wearing-hijab-in-lille-courtrooms/ French gendarmes stand outside France’s highest court (Cour de Cassation) in Paris February 13, 2014 as the court considers the appeal of former Societe Generale trader Jerome Kerviel against his 3-year prison sentence and 4.9 billion euros in fines. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE – Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS) Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com […]]]>

French gendarmes stand outside France’s highest court (Cour de Cassation) in Paris February 13, 2014 as the court considers the appeal of former Societe Generale trader Jerome Kerviel against his 3-year prison sentence and 4.9 billion euros in fines. REUTERS/Charles Platiau (FRANCE – Tags: CRIME LAW BUSINESS)

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

PARIS, March 2 (Reuters) – France’s highest court on Wednesday upheld a ban on lawyers wearing the hijab and other religious symbols in courtrooms in the north, a decision that is the first of its kind and sets a precedent for the rest of the country.

The ostentatious display of religious symbols is a moving topic in France and the court’s ruling could spark a national debate over so-called core Republican values ​​of secularism and identity ahead of the April presidential election.

The case was brought by Sarah Asmeta, a 30-year-old French-Syrian hijab-wearing lawyer, who challenged a rule established by the Council of the Bar of Lille which prohibits religious markers in its courtrooms on the grounds that it was discriminatory.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

In its judgment, the Court of Cassation said the ban was “necessary and appropriate, on the one hand to preserve the independence of the lawyer and, on the other hand, to guarantee the right to a fair trial”.

Banning the wearing of religious symbols “does not constitute discrimination”, he added.

Asmeta told Reuters she was shocked and disappointed by the decision.

“Why does covering my hair prevent my customer from qualifying for a free trial? she told Reuters. “My clients are not children. If they choose me as a lawyer, with my veil, it is their choice.”

No law explicitly states that Asmeta cannot wear her hijab, a headscarf worn by some Muslim women, in the courtroom.

In the months following her swearing in and entry into law as a trainee lawyer, the Lille Bar adopted its own internal regulations prohibiting any sign of political, philosophical and religious belief from being worn with the robe in court.

POLITICAL CHANGE

Asmeta challenged the rule of the Lille bar, calling it targeted and discriminatory. She lost the case in an appeals court in 2020 and took the case to the Court of Cassation.

Religious symbols and clothing are prohibited for officials in France because of its principle of “laïcité”, or laïcité – the separation of religion from the state.

French lawmakers and politicians have sought in recent years to extend restrictions on wearing the hijab to cover, for example, mothers accompanying their children on school trips and football players.

In the run-up to a presidential election in April, right-wing candidates focused on identity issues.

Asmeta said she plans to take her fight to the European Court of Human Rights.

The case has caused heated debate within the legal community.

More than three dozen lawyers in Paris, where the bar has imposed a similar ban, penned an open letter on Monday calling for a nationwide rule against head coverings in courtrooms.

“We lawyers do not want a community and obscurantist justice,” they wrote in the French publication Marianne.

Slim Ben Achour, a discrimination lawyer, disagreed and said such bans were hypocritical.

“It’s not possible that we lawyers, advocates, or at least that’s how we market ourselves, are blocking Muslim women [from practising]“, he told Reuters.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Reporting by Layli Foroudi; Written by Richard Lough; Editing by Geert de Clercq

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

]]>
Fasseas ’23: France’s sports hijab ban must be seen for what it is – gendered Islamophobia https://imos-journal.net/fasseas-23-frances-sports-hijab-ban-must-be-seen-for-what-it-is-gendered-islamophobia/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/fasseas-23-frances-sports-hijab-ban-must-be-seen-for-what-it-is-gendered-islamophobia/ On January 19, the French Senate voted 160 to 143 in favor of banning the hijab in sports competitions, the latest in a long line of Islamophobic gender policies that expose the state’s desire to control and targeting Muslim women in the name of secular liberation. Mama Diakité, who played club football for a decade […]]]>

On January 19, the French Senate voted 160 to 143 in favor of banning the hijab in sports competitions, the latest in a long line of Islamophobic gender policies that expose the state’s desire to control and targeting Muslim women in the name of secular liberation.

Mama Diakité, who played club football for a decade wearing a hijab, sees the ban as “the end of football” for her. Another hijabi footballer, Founé Diawara, remembers being absent from local tournaments which banned the wearing of the headscarf: “I was stuck between my passion (for football) and something that is an integral part of my identity. It’s as if they were trying to tell me that I had to choose between the two.

The amendment was originally proposed by France’s main right-wing party, Republicans, who argued that the headscarf posed a safety concern for athletes. This claim, however, is patently false. Various fitness apparel brands have developed new headgear designs that further ensure player safety, such as Velcro straps that release when pulled (it was precisely this innovation that led the International Football Association Board to lift its own hijab ban in 2012).

Beyond the dubious claim of athlete safety, this bill is grounded in the French parliament’s distortion of secular and feminist values ​​that can be traced back through more than 200 years of French history.

One of the distinctive features of the French Revolution was the violent separation of Church and State. As a result, the newly formed Republic adopted a strict secularism policy, which roughly translates to secularism. In 1905, the secularism of the state was enshrined in law, relegating religion to the private sphere while placing French citizenship and values ​​at the forefront of public life.

The large group of Maghrebi immigrants who arrived in France in the 1960s and 1970s – who have become a large part of today’s Franco-Muslim population – encountered secularism in the form of state-sanctioned assimilation policies. At the turn of the century, these policies extended to some restrictions on Islamic dress, including a 2004 ban on visible religious symbols in public schools, such as niqābs, yarmulkes, large crosses, and burqas. The attack on Muslim women’s dress culminated in 2010 with the passage of a parliamentary law stating that “no one shall, in any public space, wear clothing designed to conceal the face”. The act was justified by the protection of women’s rights and confirmed by the European Court of Human Rights in the name of living together (“living together”) in a democratic society. In this sense, secularism goes far beyond the American model of freedom of religion; it represents a kind of civil religion that seeks to shape the identity of citizens, as well as certain physical aspects of the public sphere.

Proponents of the bill also buttress their arguments by invoking feminism. It is common for French parliamentarians to refer to hijabi women as “prisoners”, “locked up”, “forced” and “victims” in debates. And while it is conceivable that a subset of Muslim women are forced to cover their heads, perceiving the hijab as a monolith of misogyny, French politicians ignore the many women who freely choose to wear a head covering. For some, wearing the hijab is simply a form of religious expression; for others, the hijab is seen as a protest against Western hegemony. So viewing the hijab as merely a symbol of “religious defiance,” in the words of Columbia law professor Seyla Benhabib, only “re-imprisons (Muslim women) within the walls of the patriarchal meaning they try to escape from.” ‘escape’.

Is the exclusion of Muslim women from sports competitions really the antidote to the French government’s concerns about sexism and secularism? The answer is a definite no.

The weak case for an ever-expanding ban on the hijab and the clear harm done to Muslim women have led critics to question the motives behind such legislation. Just a year ago, French MPs passed an “anti-separatism” bill that also hoped to root out radical Islamists and protect secular French values ​​by stepping up surveillance of mosques, sports clubs and schools. This bill, like the hijab ban, is cleverly disguised as neutral, but in practice openly targets a Franco-Muslim community of 5.7 million people. Two months before the French presidential election, French President Emmanuel Macron’s centrist party, La République En Marche!, has a clear interest in satisfying the burgeoning right with anti-immigrant and nationalist legislation.

With the 2024 Paris Olympics on the horizon, there has never been a more crucial time to stand up to the French government and demand the repeal of this amendment. All athletes, professional or otherwise, should be able to train and compete without discrimination of any kind.

Alex Fasseas ’23 can be reached at alexander_fasseas@brown.edu. Please send responses to this notice to letters@browndailyherald.com and editorials to opinions@browndailyherald.com.

]]>
We asked Muslim women why they wear the hijab while playing sports. Here’s what they told us https://imos-journal.net/we-asked-muslim-women-why-they-wear-the-hijab-while-playing-sports-heres-what-they-told-us/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 07:33:45 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/we-asked-muslim-women-why-they-wear-the-hijab-while-playing-sports-heres-what-they-told-us/ Jhe French Senate recently voted in favor of a bill to ban the wearing of the headscarf in sports competitions. Proponents of the legislation say the headscarf, or hijab, symbolizes Islamic radicalism, patriarchy and lack of female empowerment. Muslim female athletes and women’s rights activists condemned the bill, with one commentator calling it “gender Islamophobia”. […]]]>

Jhe French Senate recently voted in favor of a bill to ban the wearing of the headscarf in sports competitions. Proponents of the legislation say the headscarf, or hijab, symbolizes Islamic radicalism, patriarchy and lack of female empowerment.

Muslim female athletes and women’s rights activists condemned the bill, with one commentator calling it “gender Islamophobia”. Others pointed out how such laws have the potential to limit the inclusion of Muslim women in sport.

As researchers who study the inclusion of diversity in sport, we have conducted several studies looking at the sports participation of Muslim women over a three-year period. Our recent study, published in 2021, shows that many Muslim women want to wear a hijab when exercising, and they list many reasons for doing so.

Muslim women and sport

Muslim women’s participation in sports has remained historically lower than that of many other marginalized groups, such as indigenous groups and other racial minorities. This is particularly evident in socially conservative countries such as Saudi Arabia and Pakistan, where only a few women have competed in the Summer Olympics.

In recent years, however, more Muslim women have started playing sports, especially in Western countries. In general, there has been a boom in the sale of modest Islamic fashion wear and the hijab as fashion accessories.

In 2018, the global market for Muslim fashion wear was estimated at US$283 billion, with Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and Indonesia being the largest. This market is expected to reach $402 billion by 2024.

Various sports brands have introduced the hijab for sports to tap into this market. For example, Nike introduced a “Pro Hijab” in 2017. Several other companies, such as Ahida, LiaWear, and Asiya Sport, produced the sports hijab before Nike.

We wanted to explore what Muslim women said about wearing the hijab when participating in sports.

What the research shows

We used a three-study approach to collect the data. This means that we collected data through open-ended questions from 23 Muslim women living in the United States in the first study. Based on these results, we developed an online survey questionnaire and conducted a preliminary test with 282 women from 11 countries. We then revised our materials and conducted the final study with a sample of 347 Muslim women from 34 countries.

The women in our study were already wearing the hijab, so we asked them why they wanted to wear the hijab during sports. Among the reasons they listed were that the hijab allows them to adhere to their religious beliefs, is comfortable and gives them a sense of empowerment. One of the participants said: “The idea of ​​hijab is linked to the concept of freedom and human rights. For me, a hijab is a personal belief and ideology, and everyone has the right to follow it or not.

The influence of other people in their lives was also an important factor. For example, several participants reported that men or women in their family could influence their choice to wear the hijab.

We also found that the opinions of other Muslim women often influenced their decisions. For example, women were enthusiastic about shopping for sportswear when their friends had also done so.

However, some Muslim women have expressed fear of being harassed in Western countries when wearing the hijab in sports. For example, one participant said, “Sometimes other members of the community don’t accept a pro-sport hijab and treat the woman with a hijab differently. This can bring negative feelings to this woman, such as the fear of being judged and mistreated in society.

We argue that this fear of harassment resulting from wearing the hijab in sport in Western countries could be a major impediment to improving sport participation for Muslim women.

Other researchers have already found that for Muslim women, wearing the hijab during sporting activities can be empowering. Researchers have also argued that Muslim women view the hijab as part of their unique identity in various Western contexts. It should be noted that not all Muslim women wear the hijab.

Researchers have also previously reported that Muslim women’s modest sportswear buying behavior depends on social norms and cultural values. For example, the hijab was never worn in the Indian subcontinent. Therefore, many Muslim women in Pakistan and India practice sports without wearing hijab.

Advocates for banning or opposing the hijab in France should listen to the opinions of Muslim women who wish to wear the hijab in sport. If the voices of hijabi are not heard, it will further exclude Muslim women from sports participation.

Umer Hussain, Postdoctoral Research Associate, ADVANCE, Texas A&M University

George B. Cunningham, Professor of Sports Management, Texas A&M University

This article was republished from The Conversation. Read the original article here.


Read also : Muslim women must see that the burqa is like the chastity belt of the dark ages, writes Taslima Nasreen


]]>
The hijab row is back – when will we stop controlling women’s choices? https://imos-journal.net/the-hijab-row-is-back-when-will-we-stop-controlling-womens-choices/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/the-hijab-row-is-back-when-will-we-stop-controlling-womens-choices/ It’s midnight and instead of sleeping I find myself obsessed with news about the hijab row in India – here’s a debate there on whether Muslim girls can wear hijab in schools and colleges , and wearing it has even been banned in some schools in southern India. I’ve also read about celebrities like Bella […]]]>


It’s midnight and instead of sleeping I find myself obsessed with news about the hijab row in India – here’s a debate there on whether Muslim girls can wear hijab in schools and colleges , and wearing it has even been banned in some schools in southern India. I’ve also read about celebrities like Bella Hadid who have stood up for women’s right to wear the hijab without being persecuted, and about the French Senate’s vote to ban the hijab in sports competitions last month. Hijab news goes on and on.

I got emotional; it seems that no matter what we do as women, there will always be people trying to dictate our choices. It’s time people stopped watching what we wear and let us do it. I often find myself thinking about why I wear the hijab, its purpose, and why I have such a deep connection to it.

When I first wore the hijab, it was in eighth grade high school. Brimming with excitement to share this new chapter in my life with my classmates, I entered the classroom. But suddenly I could feel the curious eyes piercing me. That’s when someone approached me and said, “Oh wow, are you wearing a scarf now Faiza? Ah, you were so much better off without it.” I froze completely, responding with an anxious “OK.”

It wasn’t exactly what a teenager struggling with his looks wanted to hear. At the height of puberty, I had acne and knew I wasn’t the prettiest, so this comment hit hard. After putting on the hijab, I felt the pressures of society weigh on me; would I now be stereotyped and put in a box? I knew I looked different, but I didn’t realize those differences were something I needed to learn to love and embrace.

I would always have the same conversation with myself. “Why didn’t you put it on before high school, Faiza?” Now that I had put on the hijab, I felt like I was considered less beautiful than before wearing it because of society’s beauty standards. Back then, there were no cover girls wearing hijabs, no role models to look up to, and few Muslim voices were positively amplified in the media.

But that only motivated me to continue wearing the hijab and accepting it as it is. The hijab has become my light in the darkest days. It was time to rewrite the way the media saw me, to paint a picture of peace and not let a minority of people define what Islam or hijab stands for.

I struggled for the first few months of wearing the hijab and wasn’t sure if I should keep wearing it. It took me a while to realize that deep inside I felt a sense of emptiness without it. I found my love for the hijab through my mother. I was inspired by her resilience and courage. She’s an Afghan immigrant who makes her way through a country so far from home, but she hasn’t taken off her hijab despite society’s judgments, racism or ignorance.

The hijab gave her a peaceful connection to her faith, and I wanted to be a part of that too. My mother’s endless resistance encouraged me to wear the hijab with pride, reminding me to accept my differences and seek solace in the beauty of the hijab.

Eventually I found my peace wearing it. High school just got a whole lot easier, aside from some silly remarks that I’m sure a lot of women must have encountered. A boy came up to me in class and asked me how long my hair was long, while another asked me if I shower in it. Besides the obvious curiosity, I don’t let remarks bother me anymore. The hijab was and is, in a way, a relief experience for which I am truly grateful.

No one can dictate the choices I make. We will not tolerate racism or let it stop us from standing our ground. Now that the hijab row is back on, it’s time people stopped monitoring how women choose to dress. The hijab is my home and I won’t let anyone take it away from me.

]]>
The hijab ban | Opinions https://imos-journal.net/the-hijab-ban-opinions/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 16:03:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/the-hijab-ban-opinions/ Over the past two weeks, many have seen the recent videos circulating on social media regarding India’s hijab ban, and all the controversial talk that has come with it. The viral video sparked a global debate, showing a student wearing her hijab at a local school in Mandya district. She was followed by a crowd […]]]>

Over the past two weeks, many have seen the recent videos circulating on social media regarding India’s hijab ban, and all the controversial talk that has come with it. The viral video sparked a global debate, showing a student wearing her hijab at a local school in Mandya district. She was followed by a crowd of guys trying to harass her as she stood and shouted ‘Allah Akbar’ (God is great) at them. As the video shows, university guards quickly intervened and escorted her away from the crowd and into the school buildings. The thirty-second video has sparked a public debate in India and around the world about how Islamophobia takes its extreme forms in the secular government of Narendra Modi.

The BBC has published a research article online into the situation and revealed why, how and where it all started. The article states that it all started at a high school in Udupi district, Karnataka, where they banned the wearing of hijab only inside class. The college commented on the issue saying it allowed students to wear the hijab on campus and only asked them to take it off inside the classroom. In addition, adds the director of the college, “the measures were necessary so that the teacher could see the face of the student and the uniform made it possible to ensure that there was no discrimination between the students” (1).

Ironically, the controversy over banning the hijab is not new, as it dates back to 2005, when France banned the wearing of religious symbols in schools and government buildings in a heavily backed bill passed by 494 votes. against 36 votes. After that, other countries followed the path taken by France to restrict religious symbols, mainly in Europe. Examples of these were Kosovo, Denmark, Belgium, Austria and many others.

This restriction violates many fundamental rights that we have as human beings. It also violates fundamental international laws and conventions such as the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. According to Article 18, “Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion. The right includes the freedom to have or adopt a religion or belief of one’s choice and the freedom, either individually or in community with others, in public or in private, to manifest one’s religion or belief by worship, observation, practice and teaching”.

Unfortunately, the ban on religious symbols has been going on for some time. But in India, it’s even worse. The minority Muslim population has been targeted in recent times by various institutional organizations. Starting with the crimes in Kashmir, although it can be argued that the conflict has a long history. It should also be noted that it intensified with the Hindu nationalist regime of Modi. The Citizenship Act passed in 2019 grants a path to Indian citizenship for many different minorities in South Asia such as Hindus, Sikhs and Jains, but bars Muslims from doing the same. Lately, the vicious attack on Muslim women’s choice of when and where to wear the hijab, and finally, India’s ruling party posted a hateful photo on an official twitter account of hanged Muslims and said : “No mercy for the perpetrators of terrorism”. The cartoon image was so gruesome that Twitter management quickly deleted the photo posted by the Bharatiya Janata Party.

One can easily conclude that the recent attacks on Muslims are unjustifiable, not acceptable, and that the Hindu nationalist regime has gone far in expanding hate speech in India. There must be a firm objection to the BJP’s push for Islamophobia, as these ongoing assaults must be condemned and those responsible must be punished.

1. Qureshi, Imran. “Karnataka Hijab Row: Judge Refers Issue to Wider Bench.” BBC News, BBC, February 9, 2022, https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-60312864.

2. French MPs support the headscarf ban. BBC News, BBC, February 10, 2004, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3474673.stm.

3. International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, December 19, 1966, 999 UNTS 171, Can TS 1976 No 47 (entered into force March 23, 1976) [ICCPR]

]]>
Western fashion and the connection with the hijab https://imos-journal.net/western-fashion-and-the-connection-with-the-hijab/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/western-fashion-and-the-connection-with-the-hijab/ Western designers have been marketing symbols of religious identity as well as Muslim designs for years in the name of breaking down barriers. Hijabs have been everywhere on catwalks, photo shoots and magazine covers, but the designers themselves don’t call them that yet. Moreover, most of the women who wear them are not Muslim, or […]]]>

Western designers have been marketing symbols of religious identity as well as Muslim designs for years in the name of breaking down barriers. Hijabs have been everywhere on catwalks, photo shoots and magazine covers, but the designers themselves don’t call them that yet. Moreover, most of the women who wear them are not Muslim, or the designers don’t even respect its religious value, thus alienating a large population of Muslim women through cultural appropriation and turning religious headwear into a fashion trend.

For the West, modest fashion is primarily a way to capitalize on a hitherto unexplored market. The for-profit business model has little to do with empowerment or inclusivity, as it continually tries to bring the hijab – one of the most visible Islamic symbols of modesty – to market. general public without making any effort to raise awareness of the value of headgear. According to a report published in 2017 in Seduceit’s like a bandwagon effect: Nike unveiled the Nike Pro Hijab, H&M chose their very first hijabi model, Mariah Idrissi, in their campaign, American Eagle debuted the denim hijab with Halima Aden, haute couture brand Dolce & Gabbana launched a collection that included hijabs and abayas, and the list goes on.

Forbes called it “the smartest move in years,” alongside the boom in the $8.7 billion Middle East luxury market. A few years later, it seems like now everyone is jumping on the lucrative bandwagon without thinking too much.

Michael Halpern

More recently, photos of Bella Hadid surfaced in which she dons a hoodie design during Proenza Schouler’s show at New York Fashion Week. And a few days later, there are collections from Michael Halpern and Richard Quinn at London Fashion Week. The two designers experimented with hooded hoodies and came up with a garment that looks like an inspired version of a hijab and burka. While international publications highlight them with titles like: Being a neckless freak is the coolest trend and Balaclavas are getting a makeover at Halpern and Richard Quinn, it is evident that once again head covering is being glamorized by the fashion industry as hijabi women in places like France and India are still denied the right to cover their hair.

hijab

Richard Quinn

hijab

Richard Quinn

Richard Quinn

Richard Quinn

February was a miserable month for hijabi women in Europe and South Asia. In France, a new law prohibiting the wearing of “religious symbols”, including the hijab, during sports competitions, was approved by the French Senate in January. In Karnataka, India, six teenage girls have been banned from wearing the hijab in the classroom of their government-run university.

Earlier, Kim Kardashian wore a head-to-toe black look at the Met Gala, with uncanny similarities to a burqa. Her outfit was deemed “iconic” or “unique”, but no critics called it “oppressive” as they say to cover heads. Kanye West also wore a full-face mask in Paris in violation of the country’s niqab ban, and who can forget how? VogueFrance praised Julia Fox’s headscarf but remained silent when the country’s senate voted to ban the hijab for women under 18.

So the question arises of the use of symbols of religious identity in fashion, when it is not directly by, on or for Muslim women, an intrinsically cultural appropriation? Is it really a nod to a faith, religious practice or just another Deaf activity or does it actually increase the visibility of underrepresented groups?

Read: Muslim model Halima Aden quits fashion shows because of her religious beliefs

Halima Aden, the pioneering modest Somali-American model who quit in 2020, said in an interview that she feels like one of the “biggest chips” in the fashion industry. She spoke of the “internal conflict” she felt during the last two years of her career. “My hijab kept shrinking and getting smaller and smaller with each shoot,” she told the BBC. Aden detailed where she felt the religious cover hijab had been respected – for example in a campaign for Rihanna’s Fenty beauty line – and where it had gone astray, showing an example where her head had been wrapped in jeans .

hijab

There is no doubt that Western media has the power to introduce new ideas and raise awareness of the values ​​of inclusion. Example: A Muslim hijabi student in Spiderman: Far From Home, played by an Anglo-Pakistani Muslim woman Zoha Rahman. However, it is very unlikely to propel a movement or talk about an identity without having any knowledge of it. Like television, movies, and other industries that progressively try to be inclusive, and sometimes fail miserably, the fashion industry will also take decades to stop using the hijab or Muslim women in the name of commercialism. traditional.

Fashion houses or designers should note that they cannot play around with a religious identity, giving it different names (be it Muslim hijab or Sikh turban) just to standardize it for fashion, and not accepting it in the real world where it counts as part of someone’s existence. What is happening in Western fashion right now is not representation, but exploitation. The fine line should not be muddled if the goal is to showcase diversity and positive representation.



Post views:
8

]]>
On the issue of Hijab, listen to the missing voices https://imos-journal.net/on-the-issue-of-hijab-listen-to-the-missing-voices/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 00:37:48 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/on-the-issue-of-hijab-listen-to-the-missing-voices/ The lingering dispute over wearing the hijab in Karnataka’s classrooms has rekindled age-old debates around the veil, patriarchy and the status of Muslim women. However, amid the cacophony of familiar arguments and counter-arguments, one vital voice seems to be missing: that of Muslim women, especially young women, who have chosen to pursue an education in […]]]>

The lingering dispute over wearing the hijab in Karnataka’s classrooms has rekindled age-old debates around the veil, patriarchy and the status of Muslim women. However, amid the cacophony of familiar arguments and counter-arguments, one vital voice seems to be missing: that of Muslim women, especially young women, who have chosen to pursue an education in addition to their faith.

The singular narrative of Muslim women as isolated and brainwashed victims of a perceived male oppression peddled globally by imperialist powers has also found favor with majority forces at home. Often this narrative is peddled by various factions of society to ‘liberate’ Muslim women from the clutches of the Muslim man, the quintessential ‘mullah’. It’s easy to believe this singular story given its prevalence in the visual and literary depictions of Muslims around the world. The sheer number of films, pulp fiction, and talk shows based on this theme sets the discourse with which Muslims should engage. This obsession with the plight of Muslim women continues to authorize and legitimize a moral crusade to “save” Muslim women.

The harrowing images of Muslim teachers and students being forced to remove their headscarves and burkas at school gates in Karnataka recall the well-choreographed ceremonies held by French colonial rulers to publicly unveil Muslim women in Algeria. The United States’ “war on terror” was justified by the goal of “saving” Afghan Muslim women by carpet bombing Afghanistan. Anti-triple talaq legislation criminalized Muslim men to “save” Indian Muslim women. In this process, Muslim spaces are invaded, their practices criminalized and the voice of Muslim women appropriated.

The spokespersons of the hijab line in the media such as Arif Mohammad Khan, Taslima Nasreen, Javed Anand and Javed Akhtar do not represent the modern Muslim woman wearing the hijab. The lines between the right, liberals and progressives are blurred by their mutual pity for Muslim women. These voices claim to think for us and define the choices we have to make, just like the colonizers do. Muslim women prioritizing their commitments to the values ​​of their faith are not seen as a valid choice they should make. Muslim hijabi women, in the streets to defend their choice of dress, remain stubbornly ignored by those who preach the virtues of freedom. There is an obsession with defining the rights of Muslim women solely by the values ​​of choice and freedom, which are supposed not to exist within the community.

Such a framing of the oppression of Muslim women limits the other concerns that torment them. Whether it is the online “auction” of Muslim women’s bodies or the fetishization of Muslim women in Kashmir after the removal of Section 370, there is a growing trend of targeting Muslim women. Perhaps the worst of this sexualization occurs during communal riots, when the bodies of Muslim women are hunted down as prized possessions. This discourse on the liberation of Indian Muslim women is silent on their liberation from these daily acts of violence and Islamophobia.

The dynamics that shape the lives of Muslim women in India are varied and must be understood before reducing them to a single narrative. Political and historical explanations behind women’s oppression are often ignored instead of religious and cultural explanations alone, with little or no nuance. Many of the sufferings of women in general, and Muslim women in particular, can be attributed to reasons such as poverty, poor health, low level of education, limited access to public facilities and political violence inflicted to them and their families. But fears of being denied access to education and employment are not acceptable, unless there are religious reasons attached to them. The uproar over the hijab dispute shows the selective sensationalism of their concerns.

Muslim women are not silent spectators of Indian political discourse. The resilience of the women of Shaheen Bagh, many of whom wear the hijab and burqa, should not be forgotten. These women shaped the resistance by preserving the changing nature of an increasingly majority India. In this process, they also paid a heavy price, with their brothers, husbands and fathers being arrested, abused and held in Indian prisons. Civil society guardians must recognize their contribution to the defense of Indian democracy when they are most vulnerable. Any genuine commitment to combating gender-based forms of discrimination and violence in any community cannot be superimposed on an authoritarian outlook and a fixation on freedom alone.

Muslim women’s voices are infantilized, rejected and forced to choose between false binaries such as education or hijab, Indianness or Muslimness. Such a representation constantly pushes us to justify our choices, for fear of being misunderstood. Our daily lives in classrooms, professional spaces are transformed into court presence – framing and reframing, constantly polishing and refining our justifications in fear of being judged on a literacy lag scale.

The language of debate should not deprive us of the dignity of existing as practicing Muslims. Undressing Muslim women in public spaces outside university gates is nothing less than auctioning them off online, because it both humiliates and intimidates us. Our voices may be missing from the media channels, but we are definitely on the streets, fighting for the right to exist on our terms.

The author is a PhD student at IIT-Bombay-Monash Academy. She also leads a collective of Muslim women called Muslim Women Study.

]]>
Melbourne joins growing list of anti-hijab protests around the world https://imos-journal.net/melbourne-joins-growing-list-of-anti-hijab-protests-around-the-world/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 04:15:50 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/melbourne-joins-growing-list-of-anti-hijab-protests-around-the-world/ Protesters stood outside the State Library of Victoria carrying signs saying ‘Save Women’s Rights in India’ and ‘Hijab – My Right, My Choice’. Several others carried posters that read “My life” and “The hijab is my right”. Hundreds of Indian Australians, many of whom are Muslim, staged a protest at the State Library of Victoria […]]]>

Protesters stood outside the State Library of Victoria carrying signs saying ‘Save Women’s Rights in India’ and ‘Hijab – My Right, My Choice’. Several others carried posters that read “My life” and “The hijab is my right”.

Hundreds of Indian Australians, many of whom are Muslim, staged a protest at the State Library of Victoria on Sunday against what they said was an unconstitutional ban on the right of Muslim students and teachers to wear the hijab .

This followed protests held Saturday in several US cities by several foreign organizations, including Native American civil rights groups and activists.

It all started in the southern Indian state of Karnataka, where Muslim female students were suddenly banned from entering their classroom wearing a hijab. Unfazed, six students continued their studies sitting outside their classrooms, which garnered the support of several international personalities.

Subsequently, a video of a group of Hindu men from Karnataka harassing a hijab-wearing Muslim student named Muskan, went viral on social media. It sparked protests from people around the world in support of the defiant girl who raised her fists and forced her way into college.

The program in Melbourne started with the recognition of the country followed by the Indian and Australian national anthems. Several female students from schools and universities were among those who addressed the rally.

University student Sara Fawadi called the ban “absolutely ridiculous, shameful and hypocritical because schools are meant to be a safe place of learning where generations are raised and they have been turned into a discriminatory environment where people are brainwashed into hating each other.”

Image: NRI Affairs

Gisella Ali, representing The Humanism Project, a secular Indian social justice group in Australia, said: “The Indian Constitution encourages plurality, protecting Indian citizens from any form of religious discrimination that we now see in action. Uniforms in schools are intended to minimize the differences between students of different and unequal economic classes. They are not intended to impose cultural uniformity on a plural country. This is why Sikhs are allowed to wear turbans not only in the classroom, but even in the police and the army. This is why Hindu students wear bindi/tilak/vibhuti with school and university uniforms without comment or controversy. Similarly, Muslim women should be able to wear the hijab with their uniform. »

“Women should be able to access education, employment and public spaces without being humiliated or punished for their clothes. We support every woman who is told she cannot enter her educational institution because she is wearing some form of clothing,” she added.

Activist Tanvi Mor said that although the hijab is not part of her culture or religion, she understood respect, dignity and tolerance; and what it means for a woman to have access to education as a basic right. “We have reached a stage where a dress code has become a matter of religion and has been given greater importance than a girl’s right to education without discrimination,” adding that the majority of the population should not have her say on the issue of a Muslim woman’s right. right to wear a hijab.

“We have fought a century-long battle to fight for women’s rights, let’s not set them back or become an obstacle to their progress. For a country to progress, the empowerment of women is essential in all sections of society. It cannot be seen in isolation, but rather a collective effort,” she said.

More protests are planned in other Australian and New Zealand cities in the coming days.

Support for these girls came from all corners of the globe.

Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai tweeted: “Refusing to let girls go to school in their hijab is horrifying. The objectification of women persists – to wear less or more. Indian leaders must end the marginalization of Muslim women.

The Goodwill Ambassador for International Religious Freedom (IRF) tweeted Feb. 11 that “religious freedom includes being able to choose one’s religious attire.”

“The Indian state of Karnataka should not determine the admissibility of religious attire. Banning hijab in schools violates religious freedom and stigmatizes and marginalizes women and girls,” Rashad Hussain said in the tweet.

In Europe, students and scholars from Erasmus University Rotterdam in The Hague have also issued a statement of solidarity. A statement from them reads: “Students have been targeted, brutalized and subjected to threats of Hindu majority intimidation and state-sponsored violence.”

“We unconditionally support acts of resistance by Muslim students and endorse these students’ demands to be granted their constitutional rights – freedom of expression, practice of their faith and access to education,” the statement said.

Prominent voices in South Africa have spoken out against the harassment of these students in Karnataka.

Ashwin Trikamjee, leader of South Africa’s Hindu Maha Sabha, said: “All cultures, including cultural practices and beliefs, should be respected by all,” she told South African news site IOL. News.

Arthi Nanackchand Shanand, the president of Arya Samaj in South Africa, told IOL that if the Karnataka institution specifies a particular dress code, students must adhere to it. However, she believed that Hindu men had no right to prevent Muslim women from wearing the hijab in class. “It does not concern them. This is a matter between the school administration and the students. As a Hindu priest (of the Vedic Purohit Mandal), I can safely say that our scriptures do not support patriarchy, on the contrary, they support the dignity and respect of all women.

Human Rights Watch, an international non-governmental organization headquartered in New York, posted a Tweet on Twitter saying that wearing the hijab should be a personal choice. Government-imposed restrictions on wearing the hijab in schools and colleges violate India’s obligations under international human rights law.

Some well-known personalities have also joined in denouncing this policy of banning Muslim girls from attending classes.

American model Bella Hadid, in a few powerful Instagram posts, called on people to stop discriminating against Muslim women. She urged countries to rethink the decisions they have made or are trying to make in the future regarding a body that is not theirs.

Screenshot 2022 02 21 at 14.03.19

French soccer star and Manchester United midfielder Paul Pogba has shared a video clip of protests featuring burqa-clad girls being harassed by boys in saffron headscarves. The 28-year-old footballer shared the clip, on his Instagram story with the caption: “Hindu mobs continue to harass Muslim girls wearing hijab at university in India.”

Sonny Bill Williams, current heavyweight boxer and former member of the New Zealand rugby team who won the World Cup twice, tweeted in support. He said: “These thugs may tear your headscarf from your head, but they will never tear Islam or Allah from your hearts. So stay strong sisters, send love and duas to yourselves and your families.

Follow NRI cases on Facebook and Twitter for the latest updates. Support us on Patreon.

]]>