Paris city hall toughens the rules on tourist rentals

An aerial view shows the Eiffel Tower, the Seine and the skyline of Paris, France, July 14, 2019. REUTERS / Philippe Wojazer / File Photo

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PARIS, December 16 (Reuters) – The Paris city council has voted to tighten the rules on the transformation of commercial spaces into tourist rentals in order to limit the influence of colocation sites in the French capital.

It comes as officials in the world’s major tourist cities have blamed home-sharing sites such as Airbnb (ABNB.O) for the worsening housing shortage, with landlords favoring lucrative short-term rentals, pushing back low income residents.

In Paris, which has the largest number of Airbnb listings among cities in the world, much of the convenience store has disappeared in certain areas of the capital as single-storey businesses are transformed into accommodation for tourists from around the world. passage booking their stay on sites like Airbnb, Expedia and Booking.com, according to city officials.

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In the past six years, Paris has lost 59,000 square meters of retail space to short-stay housing while 900 businesses have disappeared in four years, the city said in a document outlining the plans in the news. rules.

Asked about the new rules, Airbnb said the “overwhelming majority” of hosts in Paris are locals renting out their homes for extra income, and don’t expect the new rules targeting “professionals and investors.” have “a significant impact on our activity in the city”.

Last year, more than 95% of the homes rented on the site were rented for less than the 120-day cap, as required by local regulations, the site added.

Under the new rules, permission to transform commercial premises into short-term accommodation will not be granted if it is considered to disturb the balance of local employment, housing and commerce.

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Reporting by Mimosa Spencer; edited by David Evans

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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