French muslim – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 19:11:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://imos-journal.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon.png French muslim – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ 32 32 Six French Muslim women fined for swimming in a burkini – 5Pillars https://imos-journal.net/six-french-muslim-women-fined-for-swimming-in-a-burkini-5pillars/ Mon, 26 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/six-french-muslim-women-fined-for-swimming-in-a-burkini-5pillars/ pool Six French Muslim women were fined and temporarily banned from swimming for wearing burkinis in a municipal swimming pool. The incident occurred Wednesday at the municipal swimming pool in Grenoble where Burkinis are prohibited. The women spent about 20 minutes in the water before being taken away by police who fined them. They were […]]]>

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Six French Muslim women were fined and temporarily banned from swimming for wearing burkinis in a municipal swimming pool.

The incident occurred Wednesday at the municipal swimming pool in Grenoble where Burkinis are prohibited.

The women spent about 20 minutes in the water before being taken away by police who fined them. They were also banned from swimming for two months.

The Alliance Citoyenne de Grenoble organized the pro-Burkini action. “It was 20 minutes of happiness. People applauded us as we entered the water with our swimsuits covered, ”said Naïma, an activist, who said she“ was able to swim in a public pool for the first time in ten years. “.

There is no general ban on Burkinis in France, but around twenty cities have chosen to ban them. Many people in the country regard the burkini as a symbol of political Islam and incompatible with secularism.

Annabelle Bretton, Deputy Mayor of Grenoble, said: “We told them that we would always act this way with every such action, because we follow the house rules. They want us to change it, but right now it’s not on the agenda. We have already received them three times.

But the former mayor Alain Carignon was indignant: “The Grenoblois are deprived of their swimming pools. Two are already closed. There are also gangs that come to clash there. Grenoble is the only city where you have to register three days before on the internet to be able to swim. And now there is political Islamism which tries to impose the burkini in the swimming pools.

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French Muslim Council’s political appeal for Jerusalem goes against its own rules https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-councils-political-appeal-for-jerusalem-goes-against-its-own-rules/ Sun, 23 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-councils-political-appeal-for-jerusalem-goes-against-its-own-rules/ In possible violation of a ban on political discussions in mosques, President of the French Council for Muslim Worship Mohammed Moussaoui called on his followers to take action on the Arab-Israeli conflict and recognize the importance of the al-Aqsa mosque and Jerusalem in the Muslim religion. , in a statement released Friday amid rising Israeli-Palestinian […]]]>
In possible violation of a ban on political discussions in mosques, President of the French Council for Muslim Worship Mohammed Moussaoui called on his followers to take action on the Arab-Israeli conflict and recognize the importance of the al-Aqsa mosque and Jerusalem in the Muslim religion. , in a statement released Friday amid rising Israeli-Palestinian tensions.

The president of the CFCM adopted in January a charter of “republican values” for Islam in France, which he presented to French President Emmanuel Macron in order to show that “the principles of Muslim worship are completely compatible with the principles of the Republic”. The charter included a ban on all political discussion in mosques, recognizing the problem “that places of worship are used to broadcast political speeches or to import conflicts that take place in other countries of the world.”

Friday’s statement was posted on Twitter, and also said French Muslims should “organize fundraisers for humanitarian NGOs operating in the Palestinian territories,” and “launch a major sponsorship campaign among mosques in France. and Palestinian mosques, in order to provide the latter with aid.

The Simon Wiesenthal Center warned in a press release on Sunday that the CFCM’s political prescriptions could unintentionally lead to further violence against Jews in France.

The director of international relations, Dr Shimon Samuels, argued that Moussaoui’s statement exceeded the limits of the organization.

“The CFCM seems to go beyond its religious competence by addressing political issues,” he said. “This could be, even unintentionally, interpreted by French Islamists – already heavily influenced by the Palestinian narrative supporting Hamas – to mobilize jihadist attacks against the community.”

In a letter to Home and Religious Affairs Minister Gerald Darmanin, Samuels suggested that “the CFCM statement may have negated French policy, which is to ensure that Islam in France follows the set. values ​​of the Republic … and could, even reluctantly, incite even more hatred and violence against the Jews of France. “



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French Muslim coordination body splits after extremist groups refuse to sign Macron’s anti-separatism charter https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-coordination-body-splits-after-extremist-groups-refuse-to-sign-macrons-anti-separatism-charter/ Wed, 24 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-coordination-body-splits-after-extremist-groups-refuse-to-sign-macrons-anti-separatism-charter/ Head of the Great Mosque of Paris Chems-Eddine Hafiz. (Photo by Ludovic Marin / AFP via Getty Images) Paris (CNSNews.com) – Nearly two decades after French authorities pushed Europe’s largest Muslim community to establish a coordinating body with the government, the French Council for Muslim Worship (CFCM) is falling apart, as four of its nine […]]]>

Head of the Great Mosque of Paris Chems-Eddine Hafiz. (Photo by Ludovic Marin / AFP via Getty Images)

Paris (CNSNews.com) – Nearly two decades after French authorities pushed Europe’s largest Muslim community to establish a coordinating body with the government, the French Council for Muslim Worship (CFCM) is falling apart, as four of its nine member federations are looking to create a rival organization, unhappy that other CFCM members refuse to sign a government charter intended to fight “separatism” in France.

The four federations said in a joint statement this week that they plan to create a new body to better serve the interests of French Muslims.

“The new representative body will embody the essential values ​​of an authentic and open Islam, in dignity and fairness, in perfect harmony with the values ​​and principles of the Republic,” he declared.

The four are the Federation of the Great Mosque of Paris, the Rassemblement des Musulmans de France, the Muslims of France and the French Federation of Islamic Associations of Africa, the Comoros and the Antilles.

Since 2003, the government has relied on the CFCM as its main interface with the State and regulator of religious activities. If the four federations succeed in launching their own association, the government could find itself facing competing Muslim interlocutors.

In a related controversy, Strasbourg city council this week voted to award $ 2.9 million in grants for the construction of what would become Europe’s largest mosque. The Eyyub Sultan Mosque is to be built by the Turkish Islamist group Milli Görüs (“National Vision”), a CFCM member federation which is supported by the Turkish government and operates mosques for the Turkish diaspora across Europe.

The government of President Emmanuel Macron launched a charter of the principles of Islam last year, aimed at regulating French Islam and ensuring that all Muslims respect the principles of secularism of the republic.

Among other things, the Charter called for the creation of a National Council of Imams (CNI), to oversee the training of Muslim religious leaders and their placement in mosques in France.

All CFCM federations were expected to sign the charter, but three of them – including Milli Görüs – refused to do so.

The head of the Great Mosque of Paris, Chems-Eddine Hafiz, affirms that the Islamists – “linked to foreign regimes hostile to France” – are trying to influence the formation of the CNI, and he therefore distances himself from the ‘initiative.

Franck Frégosi, expert in Islam and director of research at the National Center for Scientific Research in Paris, felt that the split of the CFCM was not really surprising, following the refusal of three federations to sign the charter.

He said there were also likely rivalries between two key figures – Hafiz, who is associated with Algeria, and CFCM president Mohammed Moussaoui, who is from Morocco.

(Tensions between the two North African countries have recently increased. Algeria supports a government-in-exile of rebels fighting for an independent Western Sahara, three-quarters controlled by Morocco. Former President Trump admitted in December last of Morocco’s claims to Western Sahara, as part of Morocco’s agreement to normalize relations with Israel.)

In a statement this week, Moussaoui accused the four dissident federations of trying to stop the work of the council. He said the CFCM would soon begin consultations with various Muslim associations, “to find a way to create a new governing body to replace the current one.”

Meanwhile in Strasbourg, an uproar ensued after the council voted 42-7 in favor of grants to help build the massive mosque, which will include a library and research center – a project estimated at some 37 millions of dollars.

Critics have come from both right and left of the political spectrum, with many fearing that the federation involved, Milli Görüs, has refused to sign the government’s charter.

Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin said the project was too closely associated with the Turkish government and insufficiently independent.

The French and Turkish governments have been at odds in recent months. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has led criticism against Macron after the French president last fall defended the right to display caricatures of Muhammad in officially secular France.

The vote in Strasbourg came shortly before Macron, in a TV interview, spoke of tensions between France and Turkey and warned of any interference from Ankara in France’s presidential election of the year next. Macron, however, did not close the door to improving relations with Turkey.


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French Muslim leader denounces refusal to sign a charter on republican principles https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-leader-denounces-refusal-to-sign-a-charter-on-republican-principles/ Fri, 22 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-leader-denounces-refusal-to-sign-a-charter-on-republican-principles/ Published on: 01/22/2021 – 19:05 The president of the Muslim umbrella association of France, the French Council of Muslim Worship (CFCM), criticized three Islamic groups for their refusal to sign a charter intended to demonstrate that Islam complies with the principles and laws of France . The Coordinating Committee of Turkish Muslims in France (CCMTF), […]]]>

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The president of the Muslim umbrella association of France, the French Council of Muslim Worship (CFCM), criticized three Islamic groups for their refusal to sign a charter intended to demonstrate that Islam complies with the principles and laws of France .

The Coordinating Committee of Turkish Muslims in France (CCMTF), the Islamic Confederation of Milli Gorus – both of which welcome Muslims of Turkish origin – as well as the Faith and Practice Movement, announced on Wednesday that they would not sign the charter. republican.

The president of the CFCM Mohammed Moussoui deplored their refusal, considering that it was “not likely to reassure (…) on the state of the representative bodies of the Muslim religion”.

The three groups criticized the charter in a statement, insisting that “certain statements are prejudicial to the honor of Muslims, with an accusing and marginalizing tone.”

Of the nine groups that make up the CFCM, five have already signed the charter.

The refusal to sign by certain members highlights the lack of agreement within the CFCM on the position of the faith and its faithful in France.

What is the charter for?

The document was approved on Sunday after weeks of sometimes acrimonious debate among Muslim leaders.

It was written at the instigation of President Macron, in a climate of fear and anger in France over the involvement of a mosque in the campaign which led to the beheading of the teacher Samuel Paty.

The intention was for Muslim leaders to agree on a text that would dispel the confusion over what Islam allows or prohibits, and assert that the faith conforms to the principles of the French Republic.

The charter aims to pave the way for the creation by the CFCM of a National Council of Imams to certify which imams are authorized to practice in France.

On Thursday, a government source suggested that the refusal to sign exposed the resistance of some groups to French Republican values, commenting that “their real faces were showing” and that “important clarification was made”.

Marine Le Pen, of the far-right RN party, called for a ban on any group refusing to sign.

What does the charter say?

The charter contains ten articles confirming the compatibility of Islam with French law. He rejects “extremist currents” within Islam.

The preamble declares that the religious principles of Islam cannot supplant the principles underlying the constitution and French laws.

Apostasy, discrimination, political Islam

In a key development, the text recognizes the right of a Muslim to change his religion or to reject any religion – which would have been the subject of considerable disagreement in attempts to reject the document, according to what Le Figaro newspaper described as anonymous sources.

Referring to the October murder of Samuel Paty, who used cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in a lesson on free speech, the charter also recognizes the “essential role of the teacher in our society” and states that any disagreement with teaching staff should be resolved through dialogue or, as a last resort, in court.

The charter affirms that the equality of women and men is a fundamental principle “also attested in the Koranic text” and affirms that “certain so-called Muslim practices have no basis in Islam”.

The document rejects “any discrimination based on religion, sex, sexual orientation, ethnic origin, state of health or disability”.

On the question of so-called political Islam or Islamism, the charter undertakes to “fight against the appropriation of Islam for political purposes, to create confrontations and divisions within society”.

The three groups refusing to sign are said to be particularly concerned about the definition of political Islam.

The statement states that religious buildings such as mosques will not be used for controversial speeches or for speeches about political conflicts taking place elsewhere in the world.

Foreign financial influence

Many federations within the CFCM are linked to the different Muslim communities in France, including Moroccan, Algerian and Turkish traditions. We are concerned about the influence of foreign countries which finance mosques in France. The charter stipulates that such buildings should not be used to promote “nationalist narratives” in favor of countries hostile to “our country, France”.

Alluding to anti-Muslim acts, the charter affirms that they are “the work of an extremist minority which should not be confused with either the French state or the French people”.

“Denunciations of so-called ‘state racism’ are akin to defamation and exacerbate both anti-Muslim hatred and hatred of France,” says the text.

“We call on our members not to distribute books, videos, blogs, etc. promoting violence, hatred, terrorism or racism, ”adds the charter.

The document is a historic first step towards the creation of a so-called Islam of France – an idea that has already been attempted by many French governments.

Such statements describing the relationship between a religion and French law are not new in French history.

Historians regularly cite Napoleon’s decision to address the relationship between Judaism and France in 1806. The process included a questionnaire addressed to Jewish religious leaders which became the basis of statements establishing the compatibility of Judaism with French law.


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3 French Muslim groups reject the Islamic charter https://imos-journal.net/3-french-muslim-groups-reject-the-islamic-charter/ Thu, 21 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/3-french-muslim-groups-reject-the-islamic-charter/ PARIS Three organizations of the French Council of Muslim Worship (CFCM) unilaterally denounced the “charter of principles” of Islam which reaffirms the compatibility of the faith with France. They disagreed with the text because it risks “weakening the bonds of trust” as well as “harming the honor of Muslims”. The Coordination Committee of Turkish Muslims […]]]>

PARIS

Three organizations of the French Council of Muslim Worship (CFCM) unilaterally denounced the “charter of principles” of Islam which reaffirms the compatibility of the faith with France.

They disagreed with the text because it risks “weakening the bonds of trust” as well as “harming the honor of Muslims”.

The Coordination Committee of Turkish Muslims in France (CCMTF) and the Islamic Confederation of Milli Gorus (CMIG) as well as the Faith and Practice movement, announced on January 20 that they had not signed the charter which was approved and presented to President Emmanuel Macron.

They called for amendments to the text of the 10-point charter that Macron described as “the founding text of relations between the state, Islam and France”.

“We obviously agree with the requirement of non-interference by States, non-instrumentalization of religions and respect for the Constitution and the principles of the Republic,” said a joint statement. “However, we believe that certain passages and formulations of the submitted text are likely to weaken the bonds of trust between the Muslims of France and the Nation. In addition, certain statements undermine the honor of Muslims, with an accusatory character and marginalizing. “

The rejection of the charter comes as France is embroiled in a bitter feud with Islamic countries, including Turkey, over offensive caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad.

All three groups said the charter was approved without obtaining full consensus from other integral components of the CFCM, including regional and departmental councils, imams who will be affected by the decision. She cited the Great Mosque of Saint Denis de la Réunion, which is one of the founding components of the CFCM, refused to sign this charter.

After weeks of internal disagreements, the CFCM, a national body of nine associations, declared that it had reached an agreement on the text of the charter “rejecting foreign interference, political Islam and certain customary practices and on respect for the gender equality “. The agreement would pave the way for the formation of the National Council of Imams which will have the power to authorize the practice of imams.

The council will restrict the entry of imams from Turkey, Tunisia, Morocco and Algeria, and 300 imams could be expelled, according to a report released by France 24.

The three organizations said that although they believe the imam’s advice is beneficial, it should derive its legitimacy from the Muslim population.

He stressed the need for “broad, democratic and participatory consultation” instead of usually signing the text that “the community cannot calmly accept”.

The Anadolu Agency website contains only a portion of the stories offered to subscribers in the AA News Distribution System (HAS), and in summary form. Please contact us for subscription options.


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French Muslim groups strike blow at Macron’s anti-extremism charter https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-groups-strike-blow-at-macrons-anti-extremism-charter/ Wed, 20 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-groups-strike-blow-at-macrons-anti-extremism-charter/ Published on: 01/20/2021 – 9:42 PMAmended: 01/20/2021 – 9:40 PM Paris (AFP) Three Muslim groups on Wednesday refused to support an anti-extremism charter pushed by French officials following a series of jihadist-inspired attacks, dealing a blow to a flagship initiative of the government of President Emmanuel Macron. The charter rejects the “instrumentalization” of Islam for […]]]>

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Paris (AFP)

Three Muslim groups on Wednesday refused to support an anti-extremism charter pushed by French officials following a series of jihadist-inspired attacks, dealing a blow to a flagship initiative of the government of President Emmanuel Macron.

The charter rejects the “instrumentalization” of Islam for political ends and affirms equality between men and women, while denouncing practices such as female circumcisions, forced marriages or “certificates of virginity” for the newlyweds.

The French Council of Muslim Worship (CFCM), a body created almost 20 years ago to allow dialogue between the government and the Muslim community, widely welcomed the charter and five of its eight federations signed on Sunday.

However, the other three groups said on Wednesday that they could not join their colleagues.

“We believe that certain passages and formulations of the submitted text are likely to weaken the bonds of trust between Muslims in France and the nation,” the three groups said in a statement.

“In addition, some statements are prejudicial to the honor of Muslims, with an accusing and marginalizing tone.

Macron spoke out against the promotion of “political Islam” in France in November last year after a teacher was beheaded outside his school.

He had shown the students caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad as part of a free speech lesson.

The attack sparked a crackdown on extremist mosques and Islamist associations, as well as a vigorous defense of French secularism.

Macron said this week that the charter offered “a clarification of how the Muslim community is organized.”

It will also provide a framework for a new National Council of Imams which will be responsible for monitoring imams practicing in the country.

The future of the charter is now uncertain.

The three groups – two of which are Franco-Turkish organizations and the other which describes itself as an educational and cultural group – said they would only be ready to register after a “broad, democratic and participatory consultation” .

“To adopt this charter, we must recognize ourselves in its content. It would not be useful to sign a text that our community cannot calmly accept”, they wrote.


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Macron welcomes the charter of the French Muslim council to fight extremism https://imos-journal.net/macron-welcomes-the-charter-of-the-french-muslim-council-to-fight-extremism/ Mon, 18 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/macron-welcomes-the-charter-of-the-french-muslim-council-to-fight-extremism/ Published on: 01/18/2021 – 11:02Amended: 01/18/2021 – 11:04 President Emmanuel Macron on Monday greeted French Muslim leaders after they agreed on a “charter of principles” aimed at combating sectarianism and radicalized teachings accused of an upsurge in jihadist attacks in France in recent years years. The charter offers “a clarification of the organization of the […]]]>

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President Emmanuel Macron on Monday greeted French Muslim leaders after they agreed on a “charter of principles” aimed at combating sectarianism and radicalized teachings accused of an upsurge in jihadist attacks in France in recent years years.

The charter offers “a clarification of the organization of the Muslim community,” Macron said after a meeting with representatives of the French Council for Muslim Worship (CFCM), his office said.

It will also provide a framework for a new National Council of Imams which will be responsible for monitoring imams practicing in the country.

“It is about a clear, decisive and precise commitment in favor of the republic”, declared Macron, welcoming “a text truly founding of the relations between the State and Islam in France”.

Macron had urged the council to act against “political Islam” in November after the murder of Samuel Paty, a teacher who was beheaded outside his school after showing controversial cartoons of the Prophet Mohamed as part of a freedom class expression.

The attack sparked a crackdown on extremist mosques and Muslim associations, as well as a vigorous defense of French secularism which is seen as increasingly threatened by radicalized Islamic teachings.

“Defend foreign regimes”

The new 10-point charter “clearly states that the principles of the Muslim faith are perfectly compatible with the principles of the republic,” CFCM President Mohammed Moussaoui told reporters after the meeting.

The agreement was reached on Saturday during a meeting with the Minister of the Interior Gerald Darmanin after weeks of resistance from certain members of the CFCM who opposed a “restructuring” of Islam to make it compatible with the French law and values.

Moussaoui said that the eight federations of the CFCM, representing various currents of Islam, had approved the charter, but that three had not yet signed the agreement because “they need a little more time to explain this. that it means to their supporters, “said an Elysee official.

>> ‘Islam is hyper-politicized in France, but Muslims are not part of the debate’

The charter rejects the “instrumentalization” of Islam for political ends and affirms equality between men and women, while denouncing practices such as excision, forced marriages and “certificates of virginity” for the newlyweds.

“No religious conviction, whatever it is, can be invoked to evade the duties of citizens”, he specifies.

He also explicitly rejects racism and anti-Semitism, and warns that mosques “are not created for the propagation of nationalist rhetoric defending foreign regimes.”

Macron also said authorities plan to expel the 300 or so imams in France sent to teach from Turkey, Morocco and Algeria.

The agreement on the charter comes as a parliamentary committee on Monday began debate on a new law to combat “pernicious” Islamist radicalism with measures to ensure the strict separation of church and state in the public sphere.

The legislation would tighten the rules on matters ranging from religious education to polygamy, although Macron insisted the goal is to protect all French citizens without stigmatizing the country’s four to five million Muslims, the largest number in Europe.

(AFP)


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French Muslim men protect local church after wave of terror attacks https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-men-protect-local-church-after-wave-of-terror-attacks/ Fri, 06 Nov 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-men-protect-local-church-after-wave-of-terror-attacks/ A group of young Muslim men born in France stood guard in front of their city’s cathedral, symbolically protecting it and showing solidarity with Catholics over the weekend of All Saints. Elyazid Benferhat said his stomach turned when he heard of the deadly attack by Islamic extremists on a church in Nice last week. The […]]]>

A group of young Muslim men born in France stood guard in front of their city’s cathedral, symbolically protecting it and showing solidarity with Catholics over the weekend of All Saints.

Elyazid Benferhat said his stomach turned when he heard of the deadly attack by Islamic extremists on a church in Nice last week.

The priest said he was touched by the gesture, and that he gave hope in a period of deep turmoil.

“Hollow in my belly”

Speaking to the Associated Press, Benferhat – who said he was “more French than anything,” added: “But I am also a Muslim… and we have seen Islamophobia in this country, and terrorism.

“In recent years, I have had a hungry stomach,” he said, saying French Muslims are facing a new stigma when “we have nothing to do with it”.

France has been rocked by a wave of terrorist attacks, coupled with a dramatic second wave of the coronavirus pandemic, in recent weeks.

Benferhat said the beheading of teacher Samuel Paty near Paris last month – because he showed his class caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad during a free speech debate – was an act of ” incredible and unprecedented cruelty ”.

“We will protect it ourselves”

When three people were stabbed to death in Nice’s Notre-Dame Basilica last week, Benerfat – who coaches at a local football club and works for French oil company Total – said he felt compelled to ‘act “to make everyone wake up”.

That day he spoke to a friend who had been from Nice. “We got this idea,” he told AP. “We had to do something beyond paying tribute to the victims. We said, we’ll protect the church ourselves.

They recruited volunteers and guarded the church that night and all weekend – in coordination with local police.

“It’s very good, these young people who are against violence,” the priest of the cathedral told AP. “People were happy to see it. “

Despite some hatred online from far-right trolls, Benferhat said the response has been “90% positive” and his response to extremism will always come “from the heart”.

Related: Irish Prime Minister Condemns Trump’s Election Lies As Johnson Keeps Silent



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French Muslim leaders call for unity after terror attacks for fear of stigma https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-leaders-call-for-unity-after-terror-attacks-for-fear-of-stigma/ Sat, 31 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-leaders-call-for-unity-after-terror-attacks-for-fear-of-stigma/ The massacre of three people in the Notre-Dame basilica in Nice on Thursday shook all of France, including the five million Muslims in this country. The people of Nice flocked to lay flowers and candles in front of the church where on Thursday a 21-year-old Tunisian, Brahim al-Aouissaoui, stabbed three people. President Emmanuel Macron called […]]]>

The massacre of three people in the Notre-Dame basilica in Nice on Thursday shook all of France, including the five million Muslims in this country.

The people of Nice flocked to lay flowers and candles in front of the church where on Thursday a 21-year-old Tunisian, Brahim al-Aouissaoui, stabbed three people.

President Emmanuel Macron called it an “Islamist terrorist attack”.

It happened just 13 days after history teacher Samuel Paty was beheaded outside his high school in northeast Paris.

Muslim leaders in France strongly condemned the killings.

Abdallah Zekri, secretary general of the French Council for Muslim Worship (CFCM) declared that the Muslim community was “stunned by these attacks” following the “cowardly murder of teacher Samuel Paty”.

“We feel hatred and anger against these criminals, these terrorists, who use the cartoons of Mohammed as a pretext to kill here in France,” he told RFI.

“I call on our fellow citizens to be vigilant in these difficult times, to question the motivations behind these ill-intentioned attacks which sow death and division in our society.

Thursday, shortly after the knife attack in Nice, Mohamed Moussaoui, CFCM boss, said:

“As a sign of mourning and solidarity with the victims and their loved ones, I call on all Muslims in France to cancel the Mawlid feast celebrations.” Mawlid marks the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad, celebrated next Thursday.

People pay tribute to the victims outside Notre-Dame Church in Nice, France on Friday, October 30, 2020. A new suspect is in police custody as part of the investigation into a horrific attack by a Tunisian who killed him. killed three people in a French church. France has stepped up its security alert amid religious and geopolitical tensions over cartoons mocking the Muslim prophet. AP – Daniel Cole

Pitting people against each other

Nice, on the French Riviera, has a large Muslim population, mostly from neighboring Tunisia.

Many live in the quiet, cosmopolitan neighborhood around Notre Dame Basilica.

Among a series of halal butchers and shops selling North African food, Tunisian-born Leila and her husband have run a bakery for 35 years.

“We get along with everyone: Catholics, Italians, Arabs,” they told RFI. “As long as we respect people, they respect us.”

Leila said Thursday’s knife attack looked like a betrayal of her religion.

“No one has the right to kill, to take the life of a mother,” she said, referring to Brazilian mother Simone Baretto Silvaone – one of the three victims of the attack. Shortly before she died of her injuries, she asked those who were helping her to “tell my children that I love them”.

The other victims were the father of two children, Vincent Loqués, who worked at the basilica welcoming the faithful, and a 60-year-old woman whose name we do not yet know.

Leila said she felt saddened for the families of the victims but also feared that the increase in such attacks would divide society and stigmatize Muslims.

“The last time I took the tram, people were looking at us strangely,” she says. “An old man sat next to me and a woman warned him, ‘Be careful, she’s going to cut your throat.’ I preferred to be silent and not to feed the fire, but people mix everything up, pit people against each other.

A woman lights a candle in front of Notre-Dame Church in Nice, France, Friday, October 30, 2020.
A woman lights a candle in front of Notre-Dame Church in Nice, France, Friday, October 30, 2020. AP – Daniel Cole

The enemy within ‘

The French government has promised to crack down on religious extremism and separatism, what Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin called “the enemy within”.

Authorities recently closed a mosque on the outskirts of Paris, Darmanin proposed to ban several Muslim groups, and even suggested a ban on the sale of halal and kosher food in supermarkets.

Some Muslims believe there is a risk that Islam in general, rather than the perpetrators of terrorist attacks, will be labeled an enemy.

“Like all French citizens, we are devastated by what happened,” an elderly man, leaving the Grand Mosque in Paris, told RFI.

“These people do not represent Islam at all. They say ‘Allahu Akbar’ but when they are before God they will be punished. How can they kill on our behalf? It is not possible.

“You know, the Quran says’ whoever takes a life – [unless as a punishment for murder or mischief in the land] – it will be as if they were killing all of humanity ”.

All the children of God

A young devotee said he feared people would increasingly confuse Islam with terror. Pointing to the people coming out of the mosque, he said, “You can see that there are a lot of good Muslims; terrorists can be Christians, Muslims, or whatever. Stupidity knows no religion or border.

“The people who carry out these attacks are not Muslims,” ​​insisted a young woman in a hijab. “A true Muslim has beliefs and fears Allah. “

“I am very shocked by people who cut the throats of other people,” an older woman told RFI, her voice trembling. “They hadn’t done anything wrong, they were just praying in church. Why such hatred? We are all children of God. It must stop.

French soldiers patrol near Notre-Dame Church in the aftermath of a deadly knife attack in Nice, France, October 30, 2020.
French soldiers patrol near Notre-Dame Church in the aftermath of a deadly knife attack in Nice, France, October 30, 2020. REUTERS – ÉRIC GAILLARD

The challenge of conquering evil

Heavily armed French soldiers are now mobilized to protect places of worship, in particular Catholic churches, before the religious holiday of All Saints on Sunday.

Several stood in front of the doors of a church in the old quarter of Nice where Father Michel Angela prayed Thursday evening to bring comfort to people traumatized by knife attacks.

“You cannot react when the emotion is too strong, you have to take a little time to react more calmly”, he explained to RFI, explaining why they had waited several hours before welcoming the parishioners.

“Evil is the challenge,” he said, quoting 20th century French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. “This is indeed the great challenge we are now facing.

Pascal was among the twenty or so faithful to the church. “We always think that a church is a sacred place, that it offers protection,” he said. “But history repeats itself, it’s always the same violence, men against men, opposing each other on completely absurd ideas”.

For Leah, Thursday’s attack brought back bitter memories of the July 14, 2016 terrorist attack when a Tunisian with ties to the Islamic State armed group drove a truck on the Promenade des Anglais in Nice, killing 86 people, including many Muslims.

“We have been particularly targeted here in Nice,” she said. “We try not to give in to fear, hatred or anguish, but to live in peace and with love. It is a challenge, given what is happening today in this context of global terrorism.

Yassin, brother of Nice attacker Brahim Issaoui, holds passport photo of his brother and says family find it hard to believe he was responsible for the brutal killings
Yassin, brother of Nice attacker Brahim Issaoui, holds passport photo of his brother and says family find it hard to believe he was responsible for the brutal killings AFP

Interfaith dialogue

Mohamed Colin, editor of the Muslim daily Saphirnews, said his publication was “deeply saddened” by what had happened and wished to show his deep solidarity with French Catholics.

“We know full well that Muslims in France have many links with Catholics. There is solidarity between these two communities, “he told RFI. World religions program.

“Interfaith dialogue is extremely rich both at national and local level. Many mosques organize debates with the support of priests. [the terrorists] precisely attempted to destroy this symbol and the initiatives that work so well.


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Persecuted French Muslim NGO leader seeks political asylum in Turkey – Middle East Monitor https://imos-journal.net/persecuted-french-muslim-ngo-leader-seeks-political-asylum-in-turkey-middle-east-monitor/ Thu, 29 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/persecuted-french-muslim-ngo-leader-seeks-political-asylum-in-turkey-middle-east-monitor/ The head of the French Muslim NGO BarakaCity publicly requested asylum in Turkey for himself and his organization, following the French government’s crackdown on its Muslim population and its dissolution of the NGO. Idriss Sihamedi, founder and director of BarakaCity, whose house was raided by the counterterrorism police two weeks ago for allegations of harassment […]]]>

The head of the French Muslim NGO BarakaCity publicly requested asylum in Turkey for himself and his organization, following the French government’s crackdown on its Muslim population and its dissolution of the NGO.

Idriss Sihamedi, founder and director of BarakaCity, whose house was raided by the counterterrorism police two weeks ago for allegations of harassment and extremism, announced on Twitter his request for asylum in Turkey yesterday.

In the tweet, in which he tagged Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Sihamedi said: “Following the lies of the [French] government… and the closure of the humanitarian and human rights NGO, I officially ask for political asylum for BarakaCity.

In response, the official account of the General Directorate of Migration Management of Turkey responded today, informing it that his “name, surname, identity information and asylum applications, including passport numbers … will be evaluated “once they are sent. He added that “Following your information, our Istanbul airport team will be informed of the situation.”

Sihamedi’s asylum claim in Turkey comes after BarakaCity, the NGO that distributes aid to two million people around the world, was closed and dissolved by the French government after two weeks of investigation into the links “Islamists”.

READ: France demands Arab countries prevent boycott of French companies for insults to the Prophet

In an interview with Middle East Monitor this week, Sihamedi denied the allegations and argued that the government raids against him and other organizations were carried out to send a message to the French Muslim community not to speak out or to hold opinions that contrast with those of the state and its secular values.

For many, his asylum request raises the question of an exodus of the French Muslim community and its businesses from the country, against a backdrop of government repression. Harsh measures were launched this month when French President Emmanuel Macron spoke out against “Islamist separatism” and shut down some Muslim organizations, businesses and even cafes in the country.

He also refused to condemn the disrespectful cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him), saying France will not give up on making cartoons based on free speech.

As a result, Erdogan said last week that Macron suffered from mental health issues and “needed treatment on a mental level”, asking: “What else can be said to a head of state who does not understand not freedom of belief and who behaves that way to millions of people living in his country who are members of a different faith? ” France withdrew its Turkish ambassador in response.

In retaliation for France’s repression and incendiary cartoons, calls to boycott French products, brands and companies have been launched in all Muslim-majority countries. While some have already started this boycott at a non-governmental level, such as in Kuwait and Qatar, while Erdogan officially called it in Turkey.

READ: The politicization of civilizations and ideologies: Macron, Charlie Hebdo and blasphemy in France

Calls to boycott French products – Caricature [Sabaaneh/MiddleEastMonitor]



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