French muslim – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 14:12:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://imos-journal.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon.png French muslim – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ 32 32 French Muslim arrested for killing Jewish roommate https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-arrested-for-killing-jewish-roommate/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 13:07:30 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-arrested-for-killing-jewish-roommate/ A Muslim man was arrested for allegedly killing his roommate, Eyal Haddad, on August 20. The Times of Israel (TOI) reported that the alleged attacker, Mohamed Dridi, confessed to killing Haddad, 34, because Haddad owed him 100 euros and because Haddad was Jewish. An ax to the head shattered Haddad’s skull and his body was […]]]>

A Muslim man was arrested for allegedly killing his roommate, Eyal Haddad, on August 20.

The Times of Israel (TOI) reported that the alleged attacker, Mohamed Dridi, confessed to killing Haddad, 34, because Haddad owed him 100 euros and because Haddad was Jewish. An ax to the head shattered Haddad’s skull and his body was later set on fire and buried. Dridi finally surrendered to the police. Haddad was originally from Tunisia and his family currently resides in Beersheba, Israel.

Various Jewish groups are calling on authorities to examine all possible motives for the murder, including anti-Semitism. An official of an unidentified Jewish organization told The Jerusalem Post that the murder appeared to be the result of a feud between friends rather than the result of anti-Semitism. “It has been three months since three Jews were killed in strange situations in France, so we need to understand if there is a reason behind these terrible situations,” the official said.

The Simon Wiesenthal Center tweeted: “Why is it that when a Jew is murdered in #France there is always a struggle to get all the facts from the authorities?”

Aviva Klompas, a former speechwriter at the Israeli Mission to the United Nations, tweeted that the “ensuing silence” over Haddad’s death “is an outrage”. “Where are the media? Where are the French authorities? Where is the EU? she asked. “Make your voice heard and demand action.”

Former Miss Iraq Sarah Idan has slammed French President Emmanuel Macron for failing to speak out against Haddad’s murder. “Islamists succeed when our leaders do not condemn their crimes, they are emboldened when our mainstream media turn a blind eye to their threat, they are strengthened when people are afraid to criticize their ideology for fear of being labeled Islamophobic” , she said. wrote.

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French Muslim women lift the veil on Islamophobia in France https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-women-lift-the-veil-on-islamophobia-in-france/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 11:56:35 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-women-lift-the-veil-on-islamophobia-in-france/ As evidenced by the country’s latest election cycle, public opinion and political rhetoric agree with their general distrust of French Muslims. This antagonistic environment has left Muslims feeling isolated, fearful and scared. France has been home to Europe’s largest Muslim population for many decades, but it remains a hostile environment for them. In particular, Franco-Muslim […]]]>

As evidenced by the country’s latest election cycle, public opinion and political rhetoric agree with their general distrust of French Muslims. This antagonistic environment has left Muslims feeling isolated, fearful and scared.

France has been home to Europe’s largest Muslim population for many decades, but it remains a hostile environment for them.

In particular, Franco-Muslim women who wear the headscarf or the hijab are immediately vulnerable to Islamophobia.

Anissa is a 28-year-old Franco-Tunisian teacher based in Tremblay-en-France. When she went on holiday with her husband to Picardy in northern France, she immediately felt uneasy. “Every time we went out and even to the supermarket, people kept looking at me.”

Eventually, she and her husband decided to leave, cutting their vacation short to just one night. “I decided to go back to my city, where there are a lot of Muslims and people of color, and I felt a lot more comfortable,” she said. The New Arab.

“How do you prove you were discriminated against because of your hijab… You just can’t”

Anissa is not alone in her experience. French Muslim women want to be seen and heard, but negative perceptions of French society make this an impossible dream.

Assia is a Franco-Algerian writer living in Bordeaux. She explains that her hijab poses the biggest challenge during job interviews, where she often faces discrimination. “I show up in my hijab at the job interview, and even though I have the best qualifications, I don’t understand.”

Her biggest frustration is that she can’t make any claims of Islamophobia. “How can you prove that you were discriminated against because of your hijab?” she asks. “You just can’t.”

A woman holds a sign reading ‘Enough Islamophobia’ as protesters demonstrate against the anti-separatism bill in Paris [Getty Images]

Ironically, Picardy is the birthplace of French President Emmanuel Macron, who many recognize as fostering endemic Islamophobia in the country. In 2020, Islamophobic attacks in France increased by 53% and some see this as the result of his inflammatory comments towards Muslims and his anti-Islamic policies.

This includes the closure of 22 mosques across France over the past 18 months and a proposed ban on the wearing of the hijab by minors.

Macron justifies his actions by maintaining secular values ​​in France. He spoke openly about the threat of “Islamist radicalism” in France, adding that Islam is “in crisis” all over the world.

Furthermore, the recent presidential election in April clearly demonstrated how Macron’s views have contributed to the country’s hostile stance towards minorities.

Macron faced far-right candidate Marine Le Pen, leader of the National Ally, formerly known as the National Front. She achieved an unprecedented 41.5% vote share, a significant increase from their previous presidential run-off.

These figures not only indicate the growing popularity of Le Pen and the extent to which the far right has grown in France.

Assia says, “I was recently called an Islamophobic slur in my neighborhood, which had never happened to me before.

She adds that it didn’t seem like a coincidence and that the example is “part and parcel of a growing normalization of openness and voice against hatred toward Muslims.”

It is therefore not surprising that many Muslims feel disillusioned with Macron and fear for their future in France.

For Bint, a 22-year-old student from Marseille, voting in the presidential election was choosing between “the lesser of two evils”, the experience leaving her hopeless.

“Since Macron’s presidency, I have lost interest in politics because I don’t think he is interested in us. It focuses mainly on the economic part of running the country, not on the day-to-day concerns of its people.

Anissa shares the same point of view: “The recent elections have revealed the extent to which French society considers us Muslims to be a threat. It shows how much people think we are the main threat in France.

But many, like Anissa, are resigned to the fact that the perception of Muslims will always be negative. “We have to step back and look outside ourselves. We have to understand that we cannot be the defenders of Islam because people have already decided they don’t trust us,” she explains. .

“When there was a shortage of sunflower oil, many said it was because during Ramadan we used too much oil to fry the sheep. Anyway, it seems that the first target of concern in France is Islam.

Nevertheless, the French Muslim community has one saving grace in mind: Jean-Luc Mélenchon, a far-left candidate who came third in the presidential race.

Mélenchon has always expressed his support for the Muslim community. In 2020, he denounced the secularist policy of the state saying “there is hatred towards Muslims under the guise of secularism in this country”.

“The Muslim community wanted Mélenchon to win the presidency. He’s a trusted figure who can connect with everyday people like us,” Bint said.

Although he did not reach the last lap of the presidential race, his efforts are a beacon of hope for French Muslims who yearn for a president who truly sees and understands them. But for now, all they can do is hope.

Kushie Amin is a freelance writer. Her work has been published in Metro, Glamor (UK), Refinery29 and The Independent.

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French Muslim women slam Vogue’s offensive message https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-women-slam-vogues-offensive-message/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 07:29:51 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-women-slam-vogues-offensive-message/ TEHRAN (IQNA) — Vogue France has come under fire after posting a social media post that many users said was offensive to Muslim women amid increasingly public Islamophobia in France. Sharing a photo on Instagram on Friday of actress and model Julia Fox wearing a piece of fabric wrapped around her head, the outlet captioned […]]]>

TEHRAN (IQNA) — Vogue France has come under fire after posting a social media post that many users said was offensive to Muslim women amid increasingly public Islamophobia in France.

Sharing a photo on Instagram on Friday of actress and model Julia Fox wearing a piece of fabric wrapped around her head, the outlet captioned it “yes to the headscarf.”

The caption has since been edited to remove that line, but Vogue France did not acknowledge the change.

The photo was released as part of a montage featuring Fox and her boyfriend, rapper Kanye West, during Haute Couture Fashion Week in Paris. Two of the photos showed West wearing a balaclava through which only his eyes were visible.

“Yes to the headscarf – those few words were so simple,” French-Moroccan model and activist Hanan Houachmi told CNN via video call. “Yet we have begged, waited and fantasized about the day we will hear them, for us as hijabi women.”

Houachmi said the hijab had been “reduced to a mere accessory”, with Fox, who is white and non-Muslim, able to wear a headscarf as part of a “trend”, while the hijab, according to Houachmi, is seen by the French government as “the uniform of terrorists”.

In 2011, France became the first country in Europe to ban all face-covering clothing in public spaces, including balaclavas, masks, burqas and niqabs. Several other countries, including Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Denmark, followed with their own bans, partial bans and local bans on face coverings.

Last week, the French Senate also voted to ban the hijab for female athletes, although the measure now has to be voted on in France’s lower house. President Emmanuel Macron and his party oppose the ban. And last year a decision to ban anyone under the age of 18 from wearing the hijab in public was rejected by members of the National Assembly.

Many users cited Vogue’s choice of words under these circumstances as particularly insensitive for the French edition, given politicians’ efforts to crack down on the hijab, niqab and burqa.

CNN contacted Vogue France for comment but did not immediately receive a response.

“It’s almost funny, to be honest, because they make fun of us, insult us and reduce us to objects,” 18-year-old Chaïma Benaicha, who lives in northeastern France, told CNN via Twitter messages. “But when it’s a white woman doing it and not a Muslim, it’s trendy and something new in fashion even if wearing the hijab is not something you do to please people.”

Benaicha, who started wearing the hijab at the age of 14, said she received racist and Islamophobic comments at first, and told CNN she found it strange that wearing the niqab was “frowned upon” then that wearing a balaclava is “stylish” and “aesthetically pleasing to people.”

“People have tried to take my hijab off in the street many times. I find it inhumane,” Sarah, an 18-year-old French Muslim who wouldn’t give her last name, told CNN via messages. Twitter.

Sarah, a convert to Islam who lives in the commune of Évian-les-Bains in southeastern France and started wearing the hijab four months ago, said the Vogue caption France was “racist” and “shameful”, adding: “there is no other word for it.”

The furor that accompanied France’s proposed hijab ban for minors last year – as well as for mothers accompanying children on school trips – has also led to international awareness of anti-Muslim sentiment in France.

“I think it’s very indicative of the general type of thinking in France when it comes to the headscarf and Islam,” British writer and journalist Aisha Rimi said in a video call, adding that she was irritated by the lack of “tone recognition” by Vogue France. deafness of the post.”

Citing the example of Kim Kardashian’s Met Gala outfit, which covered her entire face and was head-to-toe black, Rimi said the reality star was “praised” for her innovative look while “women Muslim women who wear burkas are constantly vilified and dehumanized”. .”

“I can think of other hijab-wearing Muslim women who are also models that they could have used the same caption for, but that would never have been the case,” Rimi told CNN of Vogue’s remarks. France.

Houachmi – who is one such model, having previously appeared on the cover of Grazia Arabia wearing a hijab – said she found it encouraging that many of those who spoke about the legend did not wear a hijab and were often not Muslim, but that Vogue France still had “a long way to go” in terms of representing women wearing the hijab.

“When you turn the pages of a Vogue France, it doesn’t reflect the France of today,” she said. “That’s my problem with that.”

Source: CNN

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Review: “I was a French Muslim” by Mokhtar Mokhtefi offers a unique story https://imos-journal.net/review-i-was-a-french-muslim-by-mokhtar-mokhtefi-offers-a-unique-story/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 07:21:47 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/review-i-was-a-french-muslim-by-mokhtar-mokhtefi-offers-a-unique-story/ Eight films screened in the “Arab Spectacular” section of the Red Sea International Film Festival DUBAI: The inaugural edition of the Red Sea International Film Festival in Saudi Arabia, which runs from December 6 to 15, will showcase some of the best Arab and international films. With just over a month to go before the […]]]>


Eight films screened in the “Arab Spectacular” section of the Red Sea International Film Festival

DUBAI: The inaugural edition of the Red Sea International Film Festival in Saudi Arabia, which runs from December 6 to 15, will showcase some of the best Arab and international films. With just over a month to go before the event kicks off in Jeddah, the RSFF unveiled the first eight films that will make up the “Arab Spectacular” section of the festival, which aims to highlight the latest new works. more exciting in preview. across the Arab world.

In a statement, Edouard Waintrop, artistic director of RSFF, said: “To be able to present the variety of filmmakers and Arab stories told, and to amplify them on an international stage is the primary objective of the Festival. We know that the Arab world is not a monolith, and to see such diversity in the types of stories told through these films is unique. “

As opening night approaches, read on for eight Arab films that are expected to wow audiences in December.

“Recovery”


Famous Palestinian director Rashid Masharawi, known for his directorial work on “Laila’s Wedding” and “Ticket to Jerusalem”, will take viewers on a special journey in his latest film through photographs dating from the 1930s-1948s in the historic town of Jaffa, where his father lived before he was forced to emigrate in 1948.

“Heliopolis”


The Algerian drama is directed by Djaffar Gacem and is based on the actual events of May 8, 1945, when French colonial forces attacked thousands of Algerians in the city of Guelma (called Heliopolis in antiquity.)

“Their heads are green and their hands are blue”
For his third feature film, Emmy nominated Jay Bulger and Moroccan producer Karim Debbagh retraced American composer Paul Bowles’ 1959 expedition through Morocco in which he set out to record the various tribes of the country and their music.

“Casablanca Beats”


Moroccan director Nabil Ayouch’s film, which premiered in July, is based on the director’s childhood experience and was the first all-Moroccan film to compete for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival. It was also selected as Morocco’s candidacy for Best International Feature Film at the 94th Academy Awards.

“The exam”


Directed by Iraqi filmmaker Shawkwat Amin Korki, the review tells the story of a young Kurdish woman named Rojan who faces a forced marriage. Aided by her sister, Shilan, who herself is in an unhappy marriage, Rojan struggles to pass a college entrance exam and gain some control over her life.

“Take me to the movies”


This documentary directed by Albaqer Jaafar was one of 14 films selected by the Red Sea Fund to receive production and post-production funding. The feature film follows the journey of former soldier Nassif, who fled the war in Iraq by fleeing to the cinema.

“Memory box”


A co-production uniting Lebanon, France and Canada, this film by Beirut-born director duo Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige tells the story of a single mother from Montreal confronted with memories of her teenage past during the Lebanese Civil War. .

“Ghodwa”
This film marks the debut feature of Tunisian star Dhafer L’Abidine. The film, also written by and performed by L’Abidine, depicts an unlikely father-son relationship, where the roles are reversed. As Habib’s health deteriorates, it brings him closer to his son Ahmed, 15, from a previous marriage.


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Freedom for Afghan women but not for French Muslim women https://imos-journal.net/freedom-for-afghan-women-but-not-for-french-muslim-women/ Thu, 19 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/freedom-for-afghan-women-but-not-for-french-muslim-women/ France’s commitment to Afghan women exists while Muslim women are prohibited from wearing headscarves. French President Emmanuel Macron’s attempt to speak out for Afghan women has been branded hypocritical online given the country’s treatment of its own Muslim women. In a televised speech earlier this week, Emmanuel Macron said “Afghan women have the right to […]]]>


France’s commitment to Afghan women exists while Muslim women are prohibited from wearing headscarves.

French President Emmanuel Macron’s attempt to speak out for Afghan women has been branded hypocritical online given the country’s treatment of its own Muslim women.

In a televised speech earlier this week, Emmanuel Macron said “Afghan women have the right to live in freedom and dignity”.

The austere and extreme interpretation of Islam by the Taliban has resulted in it often forcing women to wear the hijab and full veil.

However, some people have argued that France has its own policy against Muslim women, especially those who choose to wear the veil, which in turn diminishes its voice in denouncing the practices of the Taliban.

“This place where women are ordered to wear and if they don’t comply, they cannot study or work and can even be arrested… is called France,” one user said in a comment widely shared in line.

Another Internet user also reacted to the double standard perceived in France’s concern for Afghan women. “The West is worried about the dress of women in Afghanistan. Meanwhile, Macron and France can force Muslim women not to choose to wear longer skirts or headwear. “

France has banned young girls from wearing headscarves in schools since 2005. There have also been attempts to ban women wearing headscarves in France from attending school trips with their children.

“Muslim women do not even have the right to live in peace and dignity in France. #Macron should be the last person to lecture #Afghanistan on women’s rights, “said an Internet user after the French president’s remarks on Afghan women.

While the treatment of women by the Taliban in the past still does not compare to the ability of many Muslims to study and work in France, discrimination in the country has resulted in many women being excluded from opportunities.

Recently, the EU’s highest court ruled that Muslim women can be fired from their jobs for refusing to take off the headscarf. In addition, the court ruled that companies can ban the wearing of headscarves if it protects the image of the company.

France has also banned the wearing of the full veil for Muslim women in public spaces who consider it part of their religious belief. Muslim women in France can face fines and even jail if they choose to wear the veil in public.

Source: TRT World



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French Muslim women felt violated by new law banning hijab https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-women-felt-violated-by-new-law-banning-hijab/ Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-women-felt-violated-by-new-law-banning-hijab/ A new law restricting the use of the hijab in public that has begun to be implemented in France fears spreading Islamophobia. According to the French government, the controversial new bill was made to overcome the danger of Islamic separatism as the bill passed the National Assembly, the lower house of the French parliament, on […]]]>

A new law restricting the use of the hijab in public that has begun to be implemented in France fears spreading Islamophobia.

According to the French government, the controversial new bill was made to overcome the danger of Islamic separatism as the bill passed the National Assembly, the lower house of the French parliament, on Friday.

Although it aims to protect republican values, some critics, including Amnesty International, argue that it can limit freedom of association and expression, increase discrimination and even affect the construction of mosques.

Earlier this month, the EU court legally allowed EU companies to ban Muslim employees from wearing the hijab and niqab in the workplace under certain conditions.

Here are 3 French Muslim women, whose first names have been changed, who talk about their fear of Islamophobia.

Aisha, a mother of five who lives on the outskirts of Paris, said there was a ban on ostentatious religious symbols at school when she was 14.

She remembers how she was summoned to the disciplinary committee after refusing to remove her headscarf. Then they accused her of being part of the FIS (Algerian resistance movement), even though she is Moroccan. She said she felt violated by the request to strip.

Noura, a mother-of-three and university researcher who lives in Paris, told how she was asked to leave her son’s school trip in 2019 because she was wearing a headscarf. Even the police called to the scene told him to leave, saying that France is a secular country. She felt so humiliated and cried that day, adding that she no longer sees a future there.

Hiba Latreche, 22, general secretary and vice-president of Femyso, the Forum of European Muslim Youth and Student Organisations, and a law student, said that as a hijab Muslim woman she often faces Islamophobia. She is disappointed that lawmakers are making it legal and institutionally strengthening it, making it more systemic instead of protecting them from this hate crime.

Hiba and several other Muslim women launched the “Don’t Touch My Hijab” campaign, which went viral and even received support from high-profile Muslim women such as Olympic athlete Ibtihaj Muhammad and Somali-born model. Rawdah Mohammad.

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Six French Muslim women fined for swimming in a burkini – 5Pillars https://imos-journal.net/six-french-muslim-women-fined-for-swimming-in-a-burkini-5pillars/ Mon, 26 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/six-french-muslim-women-fined-for-swimming-in-a-burkini-5pillars/ pool Six French Muslim women were fined and temporarily banned from swimming for wearing burkinis in a municipal swimming pool. The incident occurred Wednesday at the municipal swimming pool in Grenoble where Burkinis are prohibited. The women spent about 20 minutes in the water before being taken away by police who fined them. They were […]]]>


pool

Six French Muslim women were fined and temporarily banned from swimming for wearing burkinis in a municipal swimming pool.

The incident occurred Wednesday at the municipal swimming pool in Grenoble where Burkinis are prohibited.

The women spent about 20 minutes in the water before being taken away by police who fined them. They were also banned from swimming for two months.

The Alliance Citoyenne de Grenoble organized the pro-Burkini action. “It was 20 minutes of happiness. People applauded us as we entered the water with our swimsuits covered, ”said Naïma, an activist, who said she“ was able to swim in a public pool for the first time in ten years. “.

There is no general ban on Burkinis in France, but around twenty cities have chosen to ban them. Many people in the country regard the burkini as a symbol of political Islam and incompatible with secularism.

Annabelle Bretton, Deputy Mayor of Grenoble, said: “We told them that we would always act this way with every such action, because we follow the house rules. They want us to change it, but right now it’s not on the agenda. We have already received them three times.

But the former mayor Alain Carignon was indignant: “The Grenoblois are deprived of their swimming pools. Two are already closed. There are also gangs that come to clash there. Grenoble is the only city where you have to register three days before on the internet to be able to swim. And now there is political Islamism which tries to impose the burkini in the swimming pools.

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French Muslim women who are not afraid to wear the headscarf https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-women-who-are-not-afraid-to-wear-the-headscarf/ Mon, 28 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-women-who-are-not-afraid-to-wear-the-headscarf/ IIt was, for many observers, a simple campaign poster. Two women and two men, dressed casually, were smiling in front of what looked like a park. Above their heads, in bold but cheerful letters, read the words “Different, but united for you!” ” in French. But leftist candidate Sara Zemmahi wore a headscarf – a […]]]>


IIt was, for many observers, a simple campaign poster. Two women and two men, dressed casually, were smiling in front of what looked like a park. Above their heads, in bold but cheerful letters, read the words “Different, but united for you!” ” in French.

But leftist candidate Sara Zemmahi wore a headscarf – a decision that has become decidedly unusual in French politics.

Zemmahi, a 26-year-old Muslim woman and laboratory technician, ran for local elections in Montpellier on Sunday with the support of the party of French President Emmanuel Macron, République en Marche. The party withdrew its support for the poster in May; its secretary general, Stanislas Guerini, said his values ​​were “not compatible” with “the wearing of ostentatious religious symbols” on a campaign document.

Sara Zemmahi, 26, is a candidate for the local Montpellier office.

Zemmahi’s scarf does not prevent him from being free

(The Washington Post)

“It’s part of my personality. It’s part of me, but that doesn’t prevent me from being a French citizen, from working in my neighborhood, from participating. I am free, I work, I have a diploma. It’s part of me, but it doesn’t stop me from doing anything.

“For me, with or without a veil, I continue to work in my neighborhood, and that’s it.

The controversy was the last to bring the headscarf issue back into the conversation in France, whose secularism has for years placed restrictions on where and when Muslim women can wear headgear and face coverings. In April, the French Senate voted to ban girls under the age of 18 from wearing headscarves in public – a move that is unlikely to become law because it lacks political support in the lower house of the Legislative Assembly and is widely regarded as unconstitutional. Another amendment would prevent mothers who wear the hijab from accompanying their children on school trips.

In 2010, the government passed a law banning full face coverings, including the burqa and niqab, in public, citing concerns about security and inequalities. In 2004, France passed a law banning overt religious symbols – such as headgear – in public schools.

“This is nothing new,” said Rim-Sarah Alouane, a French lawyer and expert on religious freedom. “It is interesting that more and more Muslims are constantly accused of not assimilating, of not participating in society. This is not true. The more they participate in society and democratic life, the more of a problem it becomes.

Zemmahi and the three candidates on his ticket present themselves as independents. “We are not giving up,” she told Reuters. “This is my neighborhood, I was born here. The scarf was not a problem for the four of us.

It is a clear voice but rare in the debate. Analysts have noted that when the issue emerges in French politics, the voices of Muslim women are generally conspicuously absent from the conversation.

While Zemmahi’s story has captured national attention, Muslim women across France – teachers, writers, entrepreneurs, mothers – face challenges around their headscarves every day.



In 2021, we have to choose between staying at home or removing the veil to make a career

Nine of them said The Washington Post their stories. Although many in France may see it as a symbol of submission, for these women, the hijab is a symbol of strength and commitment to their culture and religion.

(The translations have been edited for clarity and brevity.)

Nawel Boumedhdi, 33, lives in Nice.

“We are diverse in our complexities and our unity”

(The Washington Post)

“People think that all veiled women are the same, whether the one in Saudi Arabia is the same as the one in the United States or the one in France. But we are all different, with different values, different histories and different heritages. We are diverse in our complexities and our unity.

“I am Nawel Boumedhdi. There is only one. I have my hobbies, my passions, my jobs. I want to be defined by my actions, my ambitions, my projects, my values. And not by what I wear.

Saliha Koussa, 57, is a writer who lives in Cannes.

In April, the French Senate voted to ban girls under 18 from wearing headscarves in public

(The Washington Post)

“Once again we see powerful men deciding what women should wear. “

“[They say:] “We give them the veil, they have to wear it. We don’t give them the veil, they can’t wear it. Women should stay at home. They can’t supervise school trips, they can’t swim, they can’t play sports. We must be invisible.

Amira Zeiter, 31, is a caregiver living in Saint Jeannet.

The ban on the veil creates “Islamophobia in our daily life”

(The Washington Post)

“The more we talk about Islam, the veil or separatism, the more we are singled out in the street … This creates state Islamophobia, as well as Islamophobia in our daily lives.

“Although I am allowed to wear the veil in a private area, I chose to take it off at work because I wanted to avoid silly criticism from my colleagues. But they found out that I wore the veil outside of work … and I had to take days off because I was sick of hearing them say, ‘Oh, Amira is going to drop a bomb!’ All because I was wearing the veil.

Nathalie Bendjilali, 44, is a housewife of seven children and lives in Marseille.

Bendjilali says wearing a headscarf should be a “personal choice”

(The Washington Post)

“This latest legislation goes against the values ​​of the republic. We are one community: the French community. It is not because we are visibly Muslim that we cannot be an integral part of the French Republic.

“We are in France, we all have a choice. Most women in France choose to wear it. If tomorrow I want to take it off and start wearing short skirts, that’s my personal choice, and no one can help me.

Lili, 40, is a writer and mother of three children in Nice. She agreed to speak on the condition that The Washington Post withhold their last name to protect their privacy.

It is not only Muslim politicians who are discriminated against, it is also ordinary people

(The Washington Post)

“During school trips, a veiled mother will not ask if the children believe in God. They are there to make sure that nothing happens to the children.

“Children have an innocent view of the world. When they see a mom, they say, “This is her mom. They don’t see the veil. What we do is impose a stereotype on children that they did not see before; the stereotype of the stupid veiled woman who speaks nothing, who does not master the language of Molière, who has no opinion.

Hager Barkous, 27, is a student from Nice. She said she was fired from her job in 2018 because her employer felt she did not follow the company dress code.

“We have to justify why we wear the veil”

(The Washington Post)

“Being able to wear the veil is a right guaranteed by the constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. But in France, that’s not how we live it. Each time, we have to justify why we wear the veil. When you go to a job interview, we don’t ask you about your skills, we ask you about the veil.

“In 2021, we have to choose between staying at home or removing the veil for a career. We are told that a veiled woman is submissive, but it is today’s society and laws that make her submissive.

Najla Marzouki, 34, is an entrepreneur with a master’s degree in risk management living in Nice.

The hijab is a symbol of strength for many Muslim women

(The Washington Post)

“People are looking at us strangely. When the media talk about “separatism”, it creates a false equivalence. I can see it in people’s eyes.

“We wear the veil, but we have a brain under it. It is a brain that allows me to communicate, to speak, to love. We are human beings with or without a veil.

Ines Lachhab, 46, has seven children and lives in Nice. She applied for citizenship twice and was refused twice – once because of her headscarf, she said.

“The veil does not harm anyone”

(The Washington Post)

“French society is so focused on the veil, but the veil doesn’t hurt anyone. Most people think that a veiled woman is a submissive woman, that she is oppressed.

“But my husband doesn’t even practice Islam. I’m free. It’s my choice. It’s my life.”

Nora Belmahi, 43, is a life coach and lives in Nice.

Belmahi says she will “keep fighting”

(The Washington Post)

“There is a minority of extremists in Islam, but people put everyone in the same basket. During this time, most Muslims live in peace.

“What I want to say to veiled women is to keep fighting. Those with degrees: Start your own business. Be confident. We have to show our competence, our potential. We have to be motivated. We must be proud of our religion, of our veil.

© The Washington Post


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French Muslim Council’s political appeal for Jerusalem goes against its own rules https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-councils-political-appeal-for-jerusalem-goes-against-its-own-rules/ Sun, 23 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-muslim-councils-political-appeal-for-jerusalem-goes-against-its-own-rules/ In possible violation of a ban on political discussions in mosques, President of the French Council for Muslim Worship Mohammed Moussaoui called on his followers to take action on the Arab-Israeli conflict and recognize the importance of the al-Aqsa mosque and Jerusalem in the Muslim religion. , in a statement released Friday amid rising Israeli-Palestinian […]]]>


In possible violation of a ban on political discussions in mosques, President of the French Council for Muslim Worship Mohammed Moussaoui called on his followers to take action on the Arab-Israeli conflict and recognize the importance of the al-Aqsa mosque and Jerusalem in the Muslim religion. , in a statement released Friday amid rising Israeli-Palestinian tensions.

The president of the CFCM adopted in January a charter of “republican values” for Islam in France, which he presented to French President Emmanuel Macron in order to show that “the principles of Muslim worship are completely compatible with the principles of the Republic”. The charter included a ban on all political discussion in mosques, recognizing the problem “that places of worship are used to broadcast political speeches or to import conflicts that take place in other countries of the world.”

Friday’s statement was posted on Twitter, and also said French Muslims should “organize fundraisers for humanitarian NGOs operating in the Palestinian territories,” and “launch a major sponsorship campaign among mosques in France. and Palestinian mosques, in order to provide the latter with aid.

The Simon Wiesenthal Center warned in a press release on Sunday that the CFCM’s political prescriptions could unintentionally lead to further violence against Jews in France.

The director of international relations, Dr Shimon Samuels, argued that Moussaoui’s statement exceeded the limits of the organization.

“The CFCM seems to go beyond its religious competence by addressing political issues,” he said. “This could be, even unintentionally, interpreted by French Islamists – already heavily influenced by the Palestinian narrative supporting Hamas – to mobilize jihadist attacks against the community.”

In a letter to Home and Religious Affairs Minister Gerald Darmanin, Samuels suggested that “the CFCM statement may have negated French policy, which is to ensure that Islam in France follows the set. values ​​of the Republic … and could, even reluctantly, incite even more hatred and violence against the Jews of France. “



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Don’t touch my hijab! French Muslim women speak out against the proposed ban https://imos-journal.net/dont-touch-my-hijab-french-muslim-women-speak-out-against-the-proposed-ban/ Tue, 04 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/dont-touch-my-hijab-french-muslim-women-speak-out-against-the-proposed-ban/ 16-year-old Mariem Chourak is a devout Muslim who considers wearing the hijab an expression of her devotion to the Prophet Muhammad, but a proposal from French senators could soon deny her the freedom to do so in public spaces. The amendment to an “anti-separatism” bill intended to strengthen France’s secular values ​​and which applies to […]]]>


16-year-old Mariem Chourak is a devout Muslim who considers wearing the hijab an expression of her devotion to the Prophet Muhammad, but a proposal from French senators could soon deny her the freedom to do so in public spaces.

The amendment to an “anti-separatism” bill intended to strengthen France’s secular values ​​and which applies to girls under 18 sparked outrage and sparked an online protest under the hashtag #HandsOffMyHijab (#PasToucheAMonHijab) which has gone viral beyond French borders.

“It’s part of my identity. Forcing me to withdraw it would be humiliation, ”Chourak said. “I don’t understand why they would want to pass a discriminatory law. “

The place of religion and religious symbols worn in public has long been a subject of controversy in France, a decidedly secular country and home to the largest Muslim minority in Europe.

France banned the wearing of the Islamic headscarf in public schools in 2004. In 2010, it banned the niqab, the full Islamic veil, in public places such as streets, parks, public transport and administrative buildings.

The amendment affects all religious symbols, although opponents say it targets Muslims. Senator Christian Bilhac told lawmakers in April he would protect young people.

“Parents should not impose dogma on their children,” he told the upper house.

A group of young women are launching the #NotTouchAMonHijab campaign from the living rooms of their families’ apartments. They were originally just a few, but over 200 women joined a WhatsApp group to prepare for the launch within days.

“The reason why we decided to translate ‘Hands off my hijab’ into its French equivalent ‘Pas Touche a mon hijab’ was because it is important that it speaks to the French, to French institutions and to the French media”, explains Hiba. Latreche, 22, one of the first women involved. “Even if it resonates internationally, it was important that it do so with the French hashtag.

They had the support of social media influencers, an American lawmaker, and Ibtihaj Muhammad, the first American woman to wear a hijab when competing at the Olympics, among others. The hashtag has been shared tens of thousands of times on various social media platforms.

In France, the hashtag was shared by leading influencers in the Muslim community, such as Myriam Sefraoui, 21, who has 78,200 followers on Instagram and is known as “Myrabelleeee” on the social network. Her post featuring her with the English hashtag written on her palm was liked 32,400 times.

“(The politicians) want our emancipation, they want to save us from this imaginary oppression, but they are the ones who oppress us,” said medical student Mona el Mashouly, 25, in her hometown of Strasbourg.

President Emmanuel Macron warns that Islamism undermines the unity of the Republic.

His government’s anti-separatism bill cracked down on forced marriages and virginity testing, and included tighter oversight of religious associations. He initially made no mention of preventing minors from wearing the hijab in public.

The conservative-dominated Senate added the amendment, along with two more that would prevent mothers from wearing a hijab when accompanying children on school trips and ban full burkini swimsuits.

A joint committee from both chambers of parliament will debate the amendments and they could still be dropped from the bill.

But for Hiba Latreche the damage is done.

“(It is) symptomatic of the constant policing of the body, of the choices and beliefs of women that we have in France,” she said, “as well as of the instrumentalization of Muslim women.


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