French hijab – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ Tue, 24 May 2022 17:43:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://imos-journal.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon.png French hijab – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ 32 32 French restaurant in Saudi Arabia refuses entry to women wearing hijab and men in traditional dress https://imos-journal.net/french-restaurant-in-saudi-arabia-refuses-entry-to-women-wearing-hijab-and-men-in-traditional-dress/ Mon, 23 May 2022 10:07:07 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/french-restaurant-in-saudi-arabia-refuses-entry-to-women-wearing-hijab-and-men-in-traditional-dress/ Many visitors to the restaurant expressed their anger over the shocking decision. Taking to social media, countless netizens tagged Saudi authorities, urging them to take action against the restaurant. The restaurant has also been accused of disrespecting Islam in the House of Islam. Commenting on the restaurant’s Facebook page, a social media user called Ameera […]]]>

Many visitors to the restaurant expressed their anger over the shocking decision.

Taking to social media, countless netizens tagged Saudi authorities, urging them to take action against the restaurant.

The restaurant has also been accused of disrespecting Islam in the House of Islam. Commenting on the restaurant’s Facebook page, a social media user called Ameera Al Qahtani said, “This restaurant deserves no stars. Because he refuses to allow women [wearing] the hijab, and refuses the Saudi dress for men. They must be expelled from Jeddah. They don’t respect our religion, and that makes me very angry.

Another user, Tariq El Eblesch, said: “They (the restaurant) need to be kicked out of Jeddah. They do not respect our religion and our traditions.

There was no immediate response or comment from the restaurant or Saudi authorities.

This is not the first time a restaurant has refused entry to hijabi women in the Gulf region. Two months ago, a famous Indian restaurant in Bahrain was closed after a woman wearing a hijab was reportedly banned from entering the establishment.

The Bahrain Tourism and Exhibitions Authority (BTEA) said it had opened an investigation into the incident, which came to light after a video showed one of the staff preventing a veiled woman from entering the establishment went viral on social media platforms, where users expressed their anger. to this behavior.

In the video, the girl is heard saying that she went with her friend to the restaurant but was surprised that her friend was not allowed in because she was wearing the hijab.

The ministry has asked all tourist outlets to comply with regulations and avoid enforcing policies that violate Kingdom laws.

“We reject all actions that discriminate against people, especially with regard to their national identity,” the ministry said.

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College administration reportedly refuses to give free tablets to Muslim students wearing hijab https://imos-journal.net/college-administration-reportedly-refuses-to-give-free-tablets-to-muslim-students-wearing-hijab/ Fri, 06 May 2022 08:47:07 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/college-administration-reportedly-refuses-to-give-free-tablets-to-muslim-students-wearing-hijab/ Muslim students demonstrate in front of the college. Photo: Times Now Ghaziabad: In a new stir to the Hijab controversy, the management of a college has allegedly refused to provide free tablets to Muslim students who wear the Hijab. The alleged incident allegedly took place on Monday in the Ginni Devi College located in Modinagar […]]]>

Muslim students demonstrate in front of the college.

Photo: Times Now

Ghaziabad: In a new stir to the Hijab controversy, the management of a college has allegedly refused to provide free tablets to Muslim students who wear the Hijab. The alleged incident allegedly took place on Monday in the Ginni Devi College located in Modinagar district of Ghaziabad.

The girls attempted to block the road near campus and created a ruckus by allegedly shouting slogans against the college administration.

However, the administration claimed that the students were not given the tablets because they did not follow the dress code.

Meanwhile, the college principal denied all allegations and said the students were not in uniform and therefore were not allowed to enter the college premises.

A second-year BA student alleged that the college authorities told them to remove their hijab when they went to the principal to inquire about the free tablets. The girl also alleged that the college authorities spoke to them in a “rude” manner, but when the police arrived they started speaking politely.

The student also said the college administration would look into the matter after Eid.

Speaking to reporters, the college principal said that they were distributing tablets to students and some students were not in uniform and therefore were not allowed to enter the college. She also said that our motive was nothing but to make sure the students wore the proper uniform.

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‘It’s brutal’ – how the hijab ban in French football affects Muslim women | sport https://imos-journal.net/its-brutal-how-the-hijab-ban-in-french-football-affects-muslim-women-sport/ Wed, 04 May 2022 11:13:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/its-brutal-how-the-hijab-ban-in-french-football-affects-muslim-women-sport/ Welcome to Moving the Goalposts, the new (and free) women’s football newsletter from The Guardian. Here is an excerpt from this week’s edition. To receive the full version once a week, simply insert your email below. Women’s football is built on a foundation of hard work, sweat and tears all over the world to get […]]]>

Welcome to Moving the Goalposts, the new (and free) women’s football newsletter from The Guardian. Here is an excerpt from this week’s edition. To receive the full version once a week, simply insert your email below.

Women’s football is built on a foundation of hard work, sweat and tears all over the world to get us to where we are now – record ratings, professionalism and steadily growing interest. However, there are still a lot of obstacles to overcome and one of them is the ban on Muslim women wearing the hijab in football in France. It’s not just about France, however, it affects how the world views Muslim female players – professional and amateur.

“I stopped playing football when I was 20 because I started wearing the hijab,” says Shireen Ahmed, Canadian sports journalist and activist. “Living without football was not going to be possible for me, but it’s really hard to find a point of return when you feel like this.”

For her, in addition to hampering Muslim girls’ chances of becoming footballers, the decision excludes them from being part of the growth of the game at all levels. “It’s not just about playing,” she says of the situation in France. “They can’t coach, they can’t referee. They are literally excluded from all space. It’s brutal. There is definitely a “we hate Muslim women” vibe.

This week, Muslims around the world celebrated Eid al-Fitr, a holiday that marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan. But in France, as Lyon prepare for their 10th Women’s Champions League final, the French Football Federation is still excluding women from the game due to a ban on “ostentatious” religious symbols (including the Jewish yarmulke). “It’s part of a system of white supremacy, xenophobia, Islamophobia and anti-Muslim sentiment,” Ahmed says. “Banning Muslim women wearing the headscarf from playing sports is extremely problematic.”

Les Hijabeuses is a French collective fighting against the ban on the FFF to promote a more inclusive society in France. The senate and parliament recently succeeded in overturning a recent bill that included an amendment to apply it to all sports in France. Now the next step is to get the FFF to change its decision.

Marion Ogier, lawyer for the Hijabeuses, says: “The French parliament decided not to prohibit the wearing of religious symbols during sports competitions, but this decision did not lead the FFF to review its rules. The state Council [the highest court in France for administrative matters] is currently examining an appeal against the federation. Ogier stresses that the government is not responsible for the current ban – the FFF is. The Hijabeuses expect a decision on the matter by the end of the year.

Ogier believes that the FFF “subjects participants in football competitions to a principle of neutrality” and this seems to show that decision-makers do not know the needs, choices and desires of those they want to “save”.

The question goes beyond the right to play football and whether or not to wear a hijab. It also goes beyond the Muslim communities of France. Ahmed says: “The compartmentalization of Muslim women is a problem. We have the same fight. They are my sisters, whether they wear a bikini, a burkini or a burqa. I will advocate for their inclusion in football. Women should have a place and they should have the possibility and the right to participate.

Banning the hijab means there is no real sense of belonging for Muslim women. “Football is truly a global language and it’s a vehicle for inclusion for so many people,” says Ahmed. “So why the hell would we exclude certain people?” She says a diverse setup when decisions are made is essential moving forward. “Muslim women are not all monolithic, we are not all the same. I think the most important thing is to really include Muslim women in the discussion.

Talking points

Road down: We are getting closer and closer to knowing the 32 teams that will be battling for the World Cup in Australia and New Zealand next year. Four teams from the 2022 Women’s Africa Cup of Nations in Morocco, which will take place in July, will get their tickets and now we know the groups. Hosts Morocco are joined by Burkina Faso, Senegal and Uganda in Group A; Cameroon, Zambia, Tunisia and Togo are in Group B; and eleven-time champions Nigeria join South Africa, Burundi and Botswana in Group C.

South Africa’s Linda Motlhalo in action against the Netherlands last month. Photography: Hollandse Hoogte/Shutterstock

Supporters for the women’s game: The Football Supporters’ Association has launched its Women’s Game Strategy to give fans a say in the development of women’s football. Its mission is to develop women’s football while ensuring that supporters participate in decision-making processes and push for positive change. The document – ​​which you can read here – details strategies for improving supporter engagement across four pillars: diversity, sustainability, education and development.

More inclusive football: Brockwell United, a popular South London team also known as the Swans, are continuing their efforts to make football more inclusive of women and non-binary players. This week they released their new kits designed by illustrator Donatella Esposito (her), with styling that reminds us of classic kits from the 1990s. BUFC President Ellie Levitt (her) said: “While we see that interest in women’s football at national and local level continues to grow, we hope that times like the Women’s Euros tournament will inspire the next generation of women and non-binary people to see this as a sport for them – we’ll be waiting with open arms. Take a look at the kits on the Instagram page.

Have a question for our editors or want to suggest a topic to cover? Contact us by emailing moving.goalposts@theguardian.com

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SC agrees to consider hearing pleas against Karnataka HC verdict https://imos-journal.net/sc-agrees-to-consider-hearing-pleas-against-karnataka-hc-verdict/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/sc-agrees-to-consider-hearing-pleas-against-karnataka-hc-verdict/ New Delhi: The Supreme Court on Tuesday agreed to consider the list of pleas challenging the verdict of the Karnataka High Court which rejected petitions seeking permission to wear the hijab inside the classroom. A bench consisting of Chief Justice NV Ramana and Justices Krishna Murari and Hima Kohli took note of submissions by lead […]]]>

New Delhi: The Supreme Court on Tuesday agreed to consider the list of pleas challenging the verdict of the Karnataka High Court which rejected petitions seeking permission to wear the hijab inside the classroom.

A bench consisting of Chief Justice NV Ramana and Justices Krishna Murari and Hima Kohli took note of submissions by lead counsel Meenakshi Arora, representing one of the petitioners, that the plea needed an urgent hearing.

“I’ll list it. Wait two days,” the CJI said.

Several petitions have been filed in the Supreme Court against the verdict of the Karnataka High Court that wearing the hijab is not part of the core religious practice which can be protected under Section 25 of the Constitution.

The high court had rejected petitions filed by a section of Muslim female students at the Government Pre-University Girls College, Udupi, asking for permission to wear the hijab inside the classroom.

The school uniform requirement is only a reasonable, constitutionally acceptable restriction which students cannot object to, the High Court has said.

In one of the pleas to the Supreme Court, the petitioner said the High Court “erred in creating a dichotomy between freedom of religion and freedom of conscience in which the court inferred that those who follow a religion cannot have the right to conscience. “”

“The High Court did not note that the right to wear the hijab falls within the right to privacy under Article 21 of the Constitution of India. It is argued that freedom of conscience is part of the right privacy,” it said.

The plea stated that the petitioner had applied to the High Court for redress for the alleged breach of his fundamental rights against the State Government Order of 5th February 2022, issued under Sections 7 and 133 of the Karnataka Education Act 1983.

The High Court had held that the government had the power to issue a contested order dated February 5, 2022, and no case is made for its invalidation.

By the said order, the Karnataka government had banned the wearing of clothes that disturb equality, integrity and public order in schools and colleges, which the Muslim girls had challenged in the High Court.

Challenging the February 5 government order, the claimants had argued before the High Court that wearing the Islamic headscarf was an innocent practice of faith and an Essential Religious Practice (ERP) and not a mere manifestation of religious chauvinism.

The petitioners had also argued that the restriction violated freedom of expression under Article 19(1)(A) and Article 21 dealing with personal liberty.

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HIJAB: A choice, a universal right or empowerment | By Zahra Khalid Haq https://imos-journal.net/hijab-a-choice-a-universal-right-or-empowerment-by-zahra-khalid-haq/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 18:59:50 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/hijab-a-choice-a-universal-right-or-empowerment-by-zahra-khalid-haq/ HIJAB: a choice, a universal right or empowerment Modesty and intimacy in the hijab, in addition to being an Islamic concept, are particularly expressed in multi-ethnic and multi-religious countries; as, in Eastern Orthodoxy or Catholicism, women wear mitres a distinctive headdress of bishops. A nun wears her headdress as a symbol of purity, a sign […]]]>

HIJAB: a choice, a universal right or empowerment

Modesty and intimacy in the hijab, in addition to being an Islamic concept, are particularly expressed in multi-ethnic and multi-religious countries; as, in Eastern Orthodoxy or Catholicism, women wear mitres a distinctive headdress of bishops.

A nun wears her headdress as a symbol of purity, a sign of her belonging to the church, of her submission to God, of her modesty and, to a certain extent, of her separation from the rest of society.

Among Hindus, head coverings are worn by most women and keep “the sari pallu” on the head. In Judaism, the sheitel is a special wig, scarf, kippah used by women.

But apparently the biggest challenge for Muslim women is to wear the hijab which covers most of the body in public, which also affects their working life and lifestyle.

Layering a specific faith, several veiled singers, veiled sportswomen, female reporters, have trolled on social media and made headlines in the recent past and been targeted for choosing to wear hijab.

Recently, a deluge of questions and comments were launched about this Pakistani rapper Eva B wearing the hijab while hailing a music broadcast.

She calls by name as an up-and-coming “niqab-chic” rapper. Similarly, a backlash has been contested in the neighboring country where the daughter of Oscar-winning musician AR Rehman has been targeted and objectified as the rarest burqa singer.

Both defended themselves with the slogans “It’s not your problem” and “It’s my choice”.

The roar of Muskan Khan standing up against the hijab as Indian Muslims captured the ‘brave moment’ to link it to a religious movement.

A Muslim female journalist in American media seeks to inspire Hijab as ‘Representation Matters’ while encountering bigoted and negative labels as a Hijabi reporting team.

Women in France are barred from a soccer field and seek to end up humiliated over the hijab in a ‘sports’ campaign using the hashtag ‘Les Hijabeuses’ in the interest of religious neutrality.

In Algeria, Hijabi is presented for the first time on public television. Conversely, a woman from the Middle East raised her voice against atrocities against women in the form of sharia forcing women to wear the hijab with irrational fear and launched the slogan “Let’s Talk”.

The feminine form – desirable, seductive and sensual in sociability outside the intimacy of the marital home – must be made to appear in the public space.

On my recent trip to a staunchly secular nation, First Lady Erdogan called it building solidarity, empowering, promoting peace in a headscarf.

Her headscarf was more like a smooth headband in appearance, which covered both the hair and the neck, giving women a neat and formal look.

Secularism is about avoiding the Western style of dressing by embracing headscarves, family values, makeup, and contemporary social activities for “the true way” following Islamic teachings.

In most South Asian countries like Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and India, the headscarf does not have a very modern life and academic in the field of linguistics.

Criticism forces women to think about her dress, constantly pushing her to feel slightly embarrassed and learn about Islam and its culture to fully embrace a religious life. Rather early [1965]I like the way [American actress] Audrey Hepburn covered her hair.

Recently, the rising tide of Islamophobia has been heard by the UN designating March 15 as the International Islamophobia Shooting Day as a way forward that presents itself as a step in the right direction of “patience” , “balance” and “tolerance”.

—The author is IKDAR’s regional manager for South Asia and Europe. A writer and researcher for advocacy and communication in a leading SDPI Pakistan think tank.

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Facing criticism, Le Pen allies temper rhetoric on hijab ban – The Organization for World Peace https://imos-journal.net/facing-criticism-le-pen-allies-temper-rhetoric-on-hijab-ban-the-organization-for-world-peace/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 17:20:20 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/facing-criticism-le-pen-allies-temper-rhetoric-on-hijab-ban-the-organization-for-world-peace/ On Sunday, French voters will choose between incumbent President Emmanuel Macron and far-right leader Marine Le Pen in the second round of the presidential election. Macron remains the frontrunner, with some apparent momentum behind him from Le Pen. However, Le Pen, who is running for the third time, seems to be closer than before to […]]]>

On Sunday, French voters will choose between incumbent President Emmanuel Macron and far-right leader Marine Le Pen in the second round of the presidential election. Macron remains the frontrunner, with some apparent momentum behind him from Le Pen. However, Le Pen, who is running for the third time, seems to be closer than before to obtaining favorable political results for his campaign. If Le Pen is elected, a French hijab ban would be gradually implemented.

Le Pen’s program has come under scrutiny as Election Day approaches. According to the National Post, in an interview with France Inter radio, Louis Aliot, the far-right mayor of Perpignan and former life friend of Le Pen, said the hijab ban was one of many political measures to fight “Islamism,” but that its implementation should be done “gradually.” He believes that the ban should start with state-run services and then be gradually expanded. said that “there will be a debate in parliament and then a decision will be made”.

The French Republic is founded on a rigorous separation of Church and State to promote the equality of all private beliefs rather than to stigmatize any particular religion. In this political system, people should have the right to practice their religion and express their faith. Therefore, an environment of mutual respect regarding religions should be fostered to allow everyone to practice and believe as they please without interference. A hijab ban is an attack on the agency of Muslim women that would disrupt their autonomy in practicing their faith.

In a country that has seen a succession of horrific terrorist attacks in recent years, issues related to France’s Muslim population, one of the largest in Europe, have become a burning political concern. Given France’s colonial history, the state’s rationale for banning the hijab, aimed at liberating and empowering young women, is highly controversial. Constantly referring to Muslim women as oppressed not only victimizes them and undermines their autonomy, but also perpetuates colonial moral justifications. The French hijab ban establishes a specific image of citizenship by openly excluding Muslim women who cover their faces and heads.

The criticism Le Pen received from the public over the hijab ban prompted his campaign approach to soften his stance and frame the ban in a way that would appeal to the interest of French voters.

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Macron warns Le Pen’s hijab ban could spark civil war in France https://imos-journal.net/macron-warns-le-pens-hijab-ban-could-spark-civil-war-in-france/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/macron-warns-le-pens-hijab-ban-could-spark-civil-war-in-france/ French President Emmanuel Macron warned his far-right rival Marine Le Pen on Wednesday that if she introduced a ban on the Islamic headscarf, or hijab, it would cause “a civil war” in France. “With me, there will be no ban on headscarves, yarmulkes and religious signs,” Macron said in a widely televised debate that was […]]]>

French President Emmanuel Macron warned his far-right rival Marine Le Pen on Wednesday that if she introduced a ban on the Islamic headscarf, or hijab, it would cause “a civil war” in France.

“With me, there will be no ban on headscarves, yarmulkes and religious signs,” Macron said in a widely televised debate that was a watershed moment for the finalists to win over millions of voters. to vote for them in the second and final round of elections on April 24.

The far-right rhetoric that dominated the campaign also prevailed during the debate.

Le Pen said she intended to free Muslim women from the uniform imposed by “the Islamists” by banning the veil in public spaces. Macron opposes the proposed ban, saying it is unconstitutional and will create a “civil war”. He said the 1905 Secularism Act was not intended to “combat any religion”.

Le Pen in turn attacked Macron for creating disunity and dividing French society during his five years in power. She insisted her plan is to ‘put French people first in their own country’, which she aimed to achieve by introducing a citizens’ initiative referendum and other reforms to improve people’s daily lives. . She spoke of the establishment of a public referendum on the subject of immigration to solve the problem of “lawlessness and mass immigration” and the creation of a European Google for data privacy.

For Macron, this election is crucial, not only because it is a battle of ideologies, but as a “referendum on what the French are deeply for or against”. He saw it as a vote on whether to stay or leave the European Union, France’s relations with Germany, environmental issues, fraternity and secularism.

Divisions over Europe

Le Pen, candidate for the National Rally, opened the debate, ensuring that harmony between all French people was restored and attacked Macron on his economic failures during the five-year term, emphasizing purchasing power, unemployment, the rise in the fuel tax that has spurred Yellow Vest protests and run up 600 million euros ($651 million) in debt from the business recovery plan during the coronavirus pandemic.

“I’ve only seen French people tell me that they can’t take it anymore, that they can’t make ends meet anymore,” she said, calling Macron “the Mozart of finance who has a very bad economic record”.

In return, Macron counterattacked Le Pen’s weak positions – Russia and the European Union – and accused her of depending on Russia and President Vladimir Putin to fund her party with a multi-million loan. euros from a Czech-Russian bank in 2017.

He said he wanted to make sure the war in Ukraine did not spread and that this was only achievable through a “strong Europe” that could bring “Russia to its senses”, noting “we are not the vassals of anyone”.

Le Pen challenged Macron’s speech to strengthen Europe and claimed that France was unable to defend its interests by being part of the policies of the European Union. While Le Pen hinted that he would leave some EU treaties and give preference to French laws, Macron promised to work alongside the EU.

The two candidates also clashed over the retirement age. Macron wants to extend it from 62 to 65 to fund social security and health care measures for the elderly.

On renewable energies, Le Pen wants to dismantle all wind turbines.

The event was organized by the TF1 and France 2 channels. The latest Ipsos poll predicted a lead for Macron with 56% against 44% for Le Pen.

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Le Pen allies temper hijab rhetoric https://imos-journal.net/le-pen-allies-temper-hijab-rhetoric/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/le-pen-allies-temper-hijab-rhetoric/ A planned hijab ban if French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen is elected would come “little by little” and be determined by lawmakers, her allies said of a decision that critics and allies have said is difficult to come by. enforce. The remarks, on one of the main controversial issues in French politics in recent […]]]>

A planned hijab ban if French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen is elected would come “little by little” and be determined by lawmakers, her allies said of a decision that critics and allies have said is difficult to come by. enforce.

The remarks, on one of the main controversial issues in French politics in recent years, marked a change in tone as the far-right core of Le Pen’s program comes under greater scrutiny less a week before the final presidential vote, Reuters reported. Monday.

Louis Aliot, the far-right mayor of Perpignan and former life partner of Le Pen, said in an interview with France Inter radio that the hijab ban was one of many political tools to fight “the Islamism”, but that its implementation should come “gradually”.

The ban should first target public services, he said, before being broadened “little by little”. “There will be a debate in parliament and then the choice will be made,” he said.

Another Le Pen ally, David Rachline, the mayor of the Mediterranean town of Fréjus, also appeared to soften his stance on Monday. “We don’t want to attack people…all these women wearing the hijab are not Islamists,” he said.

Le Pen previously said the hijab could not be seen as a sign of a person’s religious belief, but was an “Islamist uniform” that should be banned from French public space.

She has in recent years softened her image, shifting the focus from identity issues to purchasing power, the number one priority for French voters, but she hasn’t dropped far-right politics from her platform. .

Issues with France’s Muslim population, one of Europe’s largest, have become a hot topic in a country that has seen a series of deadly extremist attacks in recent years.

Lawyers in France have said banning the hijab would be targeted discrimination against Muslim women and violate the French constitution.

Le Pen’s rival, President Emmanuel Macron, last week met a woman on the campaign trail who told him she wore the headscarf on her own and considered herself a “feminist”, to which Macron replied: “It is the best answer to all nonsense. .”

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Hijab-wearing women to sue for beatings by French police – Middle East Monitor https://imos-journal.net/hijab-wearing-women-to-sue-for-beatings-by-french-police-middle-east-monitor/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 13:46:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/hijab-wearing-women-to-sue-for-beatings-by-french-police-middle-east-monitor/ Two Muslim women wearing headscarves, or hijabs, who were beaten by French police last Thursday on the Clichy bridge will file a complaint against the officers, their lawyer announced on Twitter, and Anadolu News Agency reports. Nabil Boudi said his clients who suffered police brutality still cannot recover from the shock of the incident, but […]]]>

Two Muslim women wearing headscarves, or hijabs, who were beaten by French police last Thursday on the Clichy bridge will file a complaint against the officers, their lawyer announced on Twitter, and Anadolu News Agency reports.

Nabil Boudi said his clients who suffered police brutality still cannot recover from the shock of the incident, but are determined to see justice done.

The complaint will be filed directly with the General Inspectorate of the National Police (IGPN) for intentional violence by public officials.

Video footage of the attack showed police beating two women wearing headscarves for minutes in the middle of the road, punching one and attempting to throw the other into the floor.

LILY: French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen ridiculed for comments on hijab

In other video footage taken by a bystander, police continued to attack the women, despite warnings from those present at the scene that they had the power to beat them.

After the video footage went viral, many users on social media said French police were Islamophobic.

The Paris police headquarters, in a statement, said the two women prevented a police car from stopping a suspicious vehicle crossing the road.

Based on witness reports, it was stated, contrary to the French police statement, that the police had beaten the two young women, who were exercising their right of way, for Islamophobic motives, and that the statement was ” fabricated” to protect the police.

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Facing criticism, Le Pen allies temper rhetoric on hijab ban https://imos-journal.net/facing-criticism-le-pen-allies-temper-rhetoric-on-hijab-ban/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 18:28:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/facing-criticism-le-pen-allies-temper-rhetoric-on-hijab-ban/ Marine Le Pen, candidate of France’s far-right Rassemblement national (National Rally) party in the 2022 French presidential election, speaks during a campaign rally in Avignon, France, April 14, 2022. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann/File Photo Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register Critics say banning hijab would be unconstitutional Questions related to Islam, a hot topic […]]]>

Marine Le Pen, candidate of France’s far-right Rassemblement national (National Rally) party in the 2022 French presidential election, speaks during a campaign rally in Avignon, France, April 14, 2022. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann/File Photo

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

  • Critics say banning hijab would be unconstitutional
  • Questions related to Islam, a hot topic in France
  • Macron still presented as the likely winner in opinion polls

PARIS, April 18 (Reuters) – A planned ban on wearing the hijab if French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen is elected would come “little by little” and be determined by lawmakers, her allies said on Monday, marking a change of tone less than a week in advance. of the final presidential vote.

The far-right core of Le Pen’s agenda has come under greater scrutiny as the campaign enters its final days.

Louis Aliot, the far-right mayor of Perpignan and former life partner of Le Pen, said in an interview with France Inter radio that the hijab ban was one of many political tools to fight “the Islamism”, but that its implementation should come “gradually”.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

The ban should first target public services, he said, before being broadened “little by little”. “There will be a debate in parliament and then the choice will be made,” he said.

Another Le Pen ally, David Rachline, the mayor of the Mediterranean town of Fréjus, also appeared to soften his stance on Monday. “We don’t want to attack people…all these women wearing the hijab are not Islamists,” he said.

Le Pen previously said the hijab could not be considered a sign of a person’s religious belief, but was an “Islamist uniform” that should be banned from French public space.

With six days to go until the final vote in the eurozone’s second-largest economy, Le Pen has never been closer to the Elysée, but his dramatic rise in the opinion polls appeared to stagnate after the first round as Macron stepped up. his campaign.

Major polls still show Macron as the likely winner, albeit by a narrow margin.

An Ipsos poll for France Info radio and Le Parisien newspaper published on Monday showed Macron at 56%, up 0.5% from the previous day and 3% from the first round. An Ifop poll showed a similar trend, but with the rating unchanged from the previous day at 53.5%.

Both candidates face the challenge of reaching out to left-leaning voters after their nominees have been eliminated, while maintaining their political brands, a particularly difficult task for Le Pen when it comes to Islam and immigration.

Le Pen has in recent years softened her image, shifting her focus from identity issues to purchasing power, the number one priority for French voters, but she has not abandoned far-right politics. Read more

“People who are present on our territory, who respect our laws, who respect our values, who have sometimes worked in France, have nothing to fear from the policy I want to pursue,” Le Pen told France radio. Blue.

Issues with France’s Muslim population, one of the largest in Europe, have become a hot topic in a country that has seen a series of deadly extremist attacks. Read more

Lawyers in France have said banning the hijab would violate the French constitution.

On Friday, Le Pen looked sheepish when she was accosted by a hijab-wearing woman in front of the cameras, who told her to “leave the Muslims alone”, adding: “We are French, we love this country”.

The next day, Le Pen said she recognized the issue was complex, adding that parliament would have a say in the decision and any unwanted legislation could be repealed.

Emmanuel Macron, who last weekend pledged to step up his efforts against climate change as he spoke at an event in the far-left stronghold of Marseille, reiterated his warnings to progressive voters.

“I say to all those who are still hesitating: there will be a clear referendum on April 24 because the far-right candidate is against Europe and against (politics) climate,” he said on France 5. .

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Reporting by Tassilo Hummel; Editing by Jan Harvey and Barbara Lewis

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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