French hijab – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 22:33:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://imos-journal.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon.png French hijab – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ 32 32 ‘Women. Life. Freedom’: Thousands of people march in Paris to support the demonstration against the hijab in Iran | world news https://imos-journal.net/women-life-freedom-thousands-of-people-march-in-paris-to-support-the-demonstration-against-the-hijab-in-iran-world-news/ Sun, 02 Oct 2022 22:23:35 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/women-life-freedom-thousands-of-people-march-in-paris-to-support-the-demonstration-against-the-hijab-in-iran-world-news/ Thousands of people marched through Paris on Sunday to condemn Iran’s Islamic leaders in a massive show of solidarity with protests that erupted there following the death in custody of youngster Mahsa Amini. Following large rallies in major diaspora cities, including Los Angeles and Toronto, over the weekend, a large flow of people marched from […]]]>

Thousands of people marched through Paris on Sunday to condemn Iran’s Islamic leaders in a massive show of solidarity with protests that erupted there following the death in custody of youngster Mahsa Amini.

Following large rallies in major diaspora cities, including Los Angeles and Toronto, over the weekend, a large flow of people marched from the French capital’s traditional protest hub, Place de la République, instead of the nation.

“Join the first feminist revolution!” and “Mahsa Amini — your name has shaken the tyranny of the ayatollahs!” were among the slogans carried by protesters as they sometimes braved driving rain.

They chanted “Death to the Islamic Republic!”, “Death to the dictator”, as well as “Woman. Life. Freedom”, the three words which have become the main slogan of the demonstrations in Iran.

Read more: Past protests wanted reforms, this…: Iranian official’s warning amid hijab unrest

They also sang “Baraye” (“For”) which Iranian songwriter Shervin Hajipour composed using Twitter posts about the protests.

The song became a huge viral hit on Instagram, moving many to tears, but Hajipour has now been arrested as a symbol of the vehemence of the crackdown on protests in Iran.

Despite this crackdown, which the Iran Human Rights group (IHR) says has left 92 people dead and severe internet shutdowns, protests continue daily in Iran.

Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi on Sunday again accused Iran’s ‘enemies’ of ‘conspiring’ against the state and said their attempts had ‘failed’ as the country’s biggest anti-government protests since 2019 showed no sign of slowing down.

The wave of popular unrest began after Amini, a 22-year-old Iranian Kurd arrested by vice police for violating Iran’s strict dress code for women, was pronounced dead in custody on September 16.

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Iran says it arrested nine foreigners over anti-hijab protests https://imos-journal.net/iran-says-it-arrested-nine-foreigners-over-anti-hijab-protests/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 17:18:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/iran-says-it-arrested-nine-foreigners-over-anti-hijab-protests/ Iran’s Intelligence Ministry said it arrested nine foreigners during recent anti-hijab protests that swept the country. In a statement released by the official IRNA news agency, the ministry said on Friday that those arrested include German, Polish, Italian, French, Dutch and Swedish citizens. The death in police custody of Mahsa Amini, detained for allegedly […]]]>

Iran’s Intelligence Ministry said it arrested nine foreigners during recent anti-hijab protests that swept the country.

In a statement released by the official IRNA news agency, the ministry said on Friday that those arrested include German, Polish, Italian, French, Dutch and Swedish citizens.

The death in police custody of Mahsa Amini, detained for allegedly wearing the compulsory Islamic headscarf too loosely, has sparked a wave of anger against Iran’s ruling clerics.

Her family say they were told she had been beaten to death in custody. Police say Amini, 22, died of a heart attack and deny abusing her, and Iranian officials say her death is being investigated.

Iran has claimed that the daily protests that have swept the country for the past two weeks were started by foreigners. Protesters have denied the allegations, describing their actions as a spontaneous uprising against the country’s strict dress code, including compulsory hijab for women in public.

Iran has detained foreigners in the past, often on the pretext that they were spies without providing evidence.

Critics have denounced the practice as an attempt by Iran to use detained foreigners as bargaining chips to extract concessions from the international community.

Earlier in June, Iran arrested two French citizens, Cécile Kohler, 37, and Chuck Paris, 69, for meeting protesting teachers and participating in an anti-government rally.

A number of Europeans have been detained in Iran in recent months, including a Swedish tourist, two French citizens, a Polish scientist and others.

The arrests come as leaked government documents show Iran has ordered its security forces to come down hard on anti-government protests that erupted earlier this month, Amnesty International said on Friday.

The London-based rights group said security forces had killed at least 52 people since protests over Amini’s death began nearly two weeks ago, including firing live ammunition into crowds and beating protesters with batons.

It says security forces have also beaten and groped women protesters who remove their headscarves to protest Iran’s theocracy’s treatment of women.

The state-run IRNA news agency reported renewed violence in the town of Zahedan, near the borders with Pakistan and Afghanistan. He said gunmen opened fire and threw firebombs at a police station, sparking a battle with police.

He said police and bystanders were injured, without giving further details, and did not say whether the violence was linked to anti-government protests. The region has already seen attacks on security forces claimed by militant and separatist groups.

Videos circulating on social media showed gunfire and a burning police vehicle. Others showed crowds chanting against the government. Videos from elsewhere in Iran showed protests in Ahvaz, in the southwest, and Ardabil, in the northwest.

Amnesty said it obtained a leaked copy of an official document stating that the Armed Forces Headquarters had ordered commanders on September 21 to sternly confront troublemakers and anti-revolutionaries. The rights group says the use of lethal force escalated later that evening, with at least 34 people killed that night alone.

He said another leaked document shows that two days later, the Mazandran province commander ordered the security forces to confront without mercy, going so far as to cause deaths, disturbances by rioters and anti-revolutionaries,” referring to those who oppose the 1979 Islamic revolution in Iran. , who brought the clerics to power.

The Iranian authorities have knowingly decided to harm or kill people who have taken to the streets to express their anger at decades of repression and injustice,” said Agnès Callamard, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

Amid an epidemic of systemic impunity that has long plagued Iran, dozens of men, women and children have been unlawfully killed in the latest round of bloodshed.

Amnesty did not say how it acquired the documents. There was no immediate comment from Iranian authorities.

Iranian state television reported that at least 41 protesters and police have been killed since the protests began on September 17. An Associated Press tally of official statements by authorities put at least 14 people dead, with more than 1,500 protesters arrested.

The New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists said Thursday that at least 28 journalists had been arrested.

Iranian authorities have severely restricted internet access and blocked access to Instagram and WhatsApp, popular social media apps that are also used by protesters to organize and share information.

It is therefore difficult to assess the scale of the protests, especially outside the capital, Tehran. Iranian media only sporadically covered the protests.

Iranians have long used virtual private networks and proxies to circumvent government-imposed internet restrictions.

Shervin Hajipour, an Iranian amateur singer, recently posted a song on Instagram based on tweets about Amini which received over 40 million views in less than 48 hours before it was taken down.

The Iranian non-governmental human rights organization said Hajipour was reportedly arrested.

(Only the title and image of this report may have been edited by Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Iran and the hijab – Journal https://imos-journal.net/iran-and-the-hijab-journal/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 02:30:31 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/iran-and-the-hijab-journal/ SHE was a Kurdish woman who had visited relatives in Tehran, the Iranian capital. Mahsa Amini (also known as Jina) was walking around town when she was arrested by the vice squad for not wearing the hijab in accordance with Iranian law. No one knows what happened when she was brought to the center where […]]]>

SHE was a Kurdish woman who had visited relatives in Tehran, the Iranian capital. Mahsa Amini (also known as Jina) was walking around town when she was arrested by the vice squad for not wearing the hijab in accordance with Iranian law. No one knows what happened when she was brought to the center where the authorities are providing ‘education’ on proper hijab. The next time Amini’s family saw her, she was dead.

Photo circulating online showed 22-year-old before internment; another showed her hooked up to various tubes, blood dripping from her ear. His body looks lifeless even in the photo. Reportedly, a woman who had also been detained said that Amini had complained about being beaten by the police. The state released a short CCTV clip that allegedly shows Amini collapsing.

Meanwhile, a wave of protests broke out in Iran.

The protests that started in Tehran have spread to towns and villages in most Iranian provinces. Led largely by young people, they included a wide variety of social classes and ethnicities. There are a number of issues that have caused latent discontent in Iran – notably the appalling state of the Iranian economy, which has faced international sanctions for years, and corruption in the bureaucracy.

The examples that show how some Iranian leaders indulge their nepotistic tendencies are also unnerving to many.

It is all these factors that form the bubbling background of the current protests. At its heart is the struggle over the hijab – for which Mahsa Amini was arrested and likely killed in custody. The ruling clergy in Iran considers the hijab a requirement for all Muslim women.

It’s a convenient belief because at a time when politics, from the United States to everywhere else, has become primarily about performance, imposing the hijab also makes for great political theater. Much like the reintegrated Afghan Taliban in Kabul, Iran’s conservative circles can look around at the women in their country’s public spaces and gain instant power over their own power.

Similarly, power-hungry Islamophobic politicians from parties such as Marine le Pen’s National Rally in France and Narendra Modi’s BJP in India want to ban headscarves and appeal to an ignorant and self-serving version of secularism or of the supremacy of Hindutva.

No state, whether Iranian or Saudi, French or Indian, has the right to tell women what to wear.

The truth is much simpler: no state, whether Iranian or Saudi, French or Indian, or any other, has the right to tell women what to wear.

Editorial: Protests against the hijab in Iran

At its heart, the hijab struggle shows just how eager male-dominated state apparatuses are to use their power to force women to do one thing or another. In some countries power is signaled by forcing women to wear the hijab, in others by forcing them to take it off. In both cases, the idea is that women can be ordered to do this or that.

That is why it is so encouraging to see Iranian women leading these protests. Many have cut their hair or burned their headscarves even as Iranian authorities use lethal force to suppress their summons. Having borne the brunt of the denigration of the Iranian state and treated as sub-humans, dragged in vans and detained by an increasingly repressive morality police at the slightest “provocation”, they have had enough. So they walked, even though the danger to their lives and the overall cost are enormous.

The state had recently announced that at least 41 protesters and police had been killed, but the number is likely much higher as Iran has pledged to “deal decisively” with protesters.

Here in Pakistan, women know a few things about repression and patriarchal control. Video from the streets of Tehran shows a bearded middle-aged man on a motorbike almost pushing his face through the window of an adjacent car as he shouts and yells at women inside for their inappropriate hijab. Raining abuse on them and trying to intimidate them, he only stops when the traffic around them forces him to move. Any Pakistani woman who can drive or who has spent time on the streets would not be surprised by a similar gesture.

Over the past decade, drivers, motorcyclists, grocery vendors, restaurant owners, really anyone in the public domain, have also become experts on how Pakistani women should and should not not be dressed. In these cases, it is always the women who have to be on the defensive because angry men have every right in Pakistan. “Mera jism meri marzi” is at the center of the women’s movement in Pakistan and is reflected in Iran.

This is why Pakistani women have an important role to play as allies in the struggle of Iranian women against state control of their bodies.

Even as Western feminists in white-majority countries are eager to jump in, Iranian women rightly reject these offers because they taint what is a grassroots, grassroots struggle in a country where half the population has just enough. of the repressive status quo. When white and Western feminists get involved, it is not about struggle but about rescue, and how Iranian, Pakistani or Somali women are “saved” by the “real” feminists who are also the white feminists.

Even though the internet has been blocked in many parts of Iran, many tweets, images and slogans continue to emerge through those with VPN servers. Pakistani feminists must make it their business to amplify the voices of Iranian women who are fighting and protesting and showing the world what true feminist courage really means.

The author is a lawyer who teaches constitutional law and political philosophy.

rafia.zakaria@gmail.com

Posted in Dawn, September 28, 2022

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Hijab and freedom | eKathimerini.com https://imos-journal.net/hijab-and-freedom-ekathimerini-com/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 20:02:47 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/hijab-and-freedom-ekathimerini-com/ A newspaper with a front-page photo of Mahsa Amini, a woman who died after being arrested by Iranian morality police, is seen in Tehran, Iran, September 18. [Majid Asgaripour/WANA via Reuters] Last weekend, I watched the latest episode of “Tehran”, produced by Apple TV. It’s an excellent spy series with action, tension and many twists […]]]>

A newspaper with a front-page photo of Mahsa Amini, a woman who died after being arrested by Iranian morality police, is seen in Tehran, Iran, September 18. [Majid Asgaripour/WANA via Reuters]

Last weekend, I watched the latest episode of “Tehran”, produced by Apple TV. It’s an excellent spy series with action, tension and many twists which, despite its title, was not shot in Tehran, but in Athens: in Kolonaki, Kypseli and on Kifissias avenues and Akadimias, we watch Iranian Security agents chase down Israeli Mossad agents, we see young women rebelling by throwing their headscarves into hidden spaces, but tremble at the sight of the Revolutionary Guards.

The guardians of the Iranian theocratic regime and the guarantors of stability and order are powerful and very influential in Iranian society. The series is quite convincing about the daily life of Iranian women, who are told that they should not provoke with their dress and behavior and who are forced to wear the hijab at work, on outings, at the gym, on the street, everywhere – and they have to wear it properly, hiding their hair.

This is something Mahsa Amini, 22, an ethnic Kurd from western Iran, has not done diligently. She hadn’t carefully covered her hair. She was arrested by the vice squad for wearing an inappropriate hijab and died in custody. Her father claimed he was not allowed to take her body for an autopsy. Authorities have said they will conduct a full investigation into the cause of death, but we can only imagine exactly how that investigation will unfold and how deep it will be.

The aftermath of Amini’s death is now playing out in major cities across Iran. Thousands of demonstrators took to the streets, men and women without headscarves or hijabs, demanding more rights, more freedoms.

It’s been a decade since then, but most of us remember the waves of protest in Europe when France banned women from walking the streets in burqas, hijabs or niqabs, and also banned the burkini – a swimsuit full bathing suit that leaves only the face exposed. Many European women, including in Greece, have passionately supported the right to the headscarf, arguing that no one can dictate to French Muslim women what to wear and what not to wear.

One of the slogans was “freedom is in the hijab”. Yes, if you live in Europe, you might as well shout it at a free speech rally, where of course we put all our rights and freedoms in the same blender. If you are a 22-year-old woman in Iran, you obviously have the opposite opinion. And you might even pay for it with your life.

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Countries that dictate what women should wear https://imos-journal.net/countries-that-dictate-what-women-should-wear/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 09:47:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/countries-that-dictate-what-women-should-wear/ “Don’t touch my clothes” was the resistance hashtag adopted by Afghan women after the Taliban made the hijab compulsory for female students in 2021. The women shared their photos on social media dressed in colorful and vibrant traditional Afghan outfits to protest the Taliban decree. In a similar act of defiance, female protesters are opposing […]]]>

“Don’t touch my clothes” was the resistance hashtag adopted by Afghan women after the Taliban made the hijab compulsory for female students in 2021.

The women shared their photos on social media dressed in colorful and vibrant traditional Afghan outfits to protest the Taliban decree.

In a similar act of defiance, female protesters are opposing Iran’s compulsory hijab law by removing their headscarves in public and cutting their hair.

The protests follow the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini, who was arrested for wearing tight pants and a loose headscarf (hijab) by Iranian vice police in Tehran. She later fell into a coma and died last week in police custody.

His death sparked worldwide protests and worldwide condemnation. It also highlighted the ways many states control what their citizens, especially women, can or cannot wear.

Besides Iran, here are other countries that restrict women and dictate their clothing choices.

Afghanistan

The restriction of women’s freedom has been the most visible change in Afghanistan since the Taliban took power on August 15, 2021.

In May this year, Taliban-mandated women wear the burqa (a loose garment that covers the whole body and reveals only the eyes) when venturing out of the house. Women were also told not to leave their homes unless necessary.

The Taliban force women to wear the burqa in public. Photo from AFP file

The Taliban government has also banned women from traveling long distances without a male chaperone.

Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia requires women to dress “modestly”, and therefore tight clothing, sleeveless shirts, short dresses and sheer fabrics are not permitted.

Heavy makeup is also frowned upon, note The week.

The traditional abaya (a long, loose garment with a black headscarf or niqab) is worn by women in public.

However, this law was relaxed in 2018 and women could choose not to wear an abaya.

Mandatory hijab in Iran burqa banned in France Countries that dictate what women should wear

Saudi Arabia requires women to dress “modestly”, and therefore tight clothing is not permitted. Photo from AFP file

There is no such dictate for the dress of Saudi men, who typically wear a thobe (an ankle-length tunic that covers their arms). Men can choose their clothes as long as they hide their torsos and knees.

Dress code enforcement in Saudi Arabia was eased in 2016 when Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman “stripped the religious police of their powers of arrest, removing those responsible for enforcing the Saudi dress code”, reports The Wall Street Journal.

Mandatory hijab in Iran burqa banned in France Countries that dictate what women should wear

France, Iran, Saudi Arabia and North Korea are among the nations that dictate women’s clothing. Graphic: Pranay Bhardwaj

North Korea

Among North Korea’s many bizarre rules, such as a ban on watching foreign movies, its citizens’ clothing choices are also regulated.

To curb any form of Western influence, North Korea bans piercings, skinny jeans, and several hairstyles.

Women wearing skirts should ensure their knees are covered. According Initiatedthe country has stepped up its crackdown on tight jeans, dyed hair and other styles, which primarily target women.

The country’s Patriotic Socialist Youth League stops people on the roads, takes them to their office and only releases them after someone brings “acceptable” clothing, a source said. Radio Libre Asia.

“Youth league patrols are cracking down on young people who wear waist-length hair and those who dye their hair brown, as well as people who wear clothes with large foreign letters and women who wear tight pants,” the source said. quoted as saying by the US media nonprofit.

North Korea allows a list of hairstyles for its citizens – 18 for women and 10 for men, reports times now.

France

France prohibits Muslim women from wearing the full Islamic veil (burqa and niqab) in several public places, including streets, shops and hospitals.

The hijab is not allowed in public schools, middle schools and high schools. A law was passed in 2004 in France banning the wearing of religious symbols considered “visible” in schools, reports CNN.

The French football federation does not allow women wearing the hijab to compete in the sport. The ban sparked a backlash from many Muslim players.

Mandatory hijab in Iran burqa banned in France Countries that dictate what women should wear

The French football federation does not allow women wearing the hijab to compete in the sport. Photo from AFP file

“What we want is to be accepted as we are, to implement these great slogans of diversity, of inclusion,” said Founé Diawara, president of Hijabeuses, a group of young female footballers wearing the hijab.

“Our only desire is to play football,” Diawara said as quoted by The New York Times.

Other European nations

Other European countries, including the Netherlands, Denmark, Austria and Belgium, have banned the wearing of the full veil by Muslim women.

In the Netherlands, the ban also applies to full-face helmets and balaclavas, in addition to burqas, Deutsche Welle reports.

Bulgaria imposed a burqa ban in 2016.

Sorrento in Italy

In July this year, Italy’s famous tourist destination Sorrento banned bikinis, citing locals feeling “uncomfortable and uneasy”.

Although bikinis are allowed in pool or beach clubs, people are fined if seen walking around in swimsuits in other places like stores or restaurants, reports Mirror.

Some countries that have imposed rigid dress codes

Uganda had repealed its controversial anti-pornography law in 2021 under which mini-skirts were banned.

In 2019, Sudan repealed its “public order” law, which dictated how women dress and act in public.

The law allowed security forces to arrest women for ‘the most insignificant reasons’, such as wearing pants, not wearing the hijab in public or mingling with men, reports Egyptian streets.

With contributions from agencies

Read all Recent news, New trends, Cricket News, bollywood news,
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Rage against the hijab after the death of a woman arrested by the morality police https://imos-journal.net/rage-against-the-hijab-after-the-death-of-a-woman-arrested-by-the-morality-police/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 16:29:43 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/rage-against-the-hijab-after-the-death-of-a-woman-arrested-by-the-morality-police/ NOTE TO READERS: This week’s bulletin is released a day early to report on the strong reaction across Iran to the death of Mahsa Amini. Welcome back to the Farda Briefing, an RFE/RL newsletter that follows the main issues in Iran and explains why they matter. I am RFE/RL correspondent Golnaz Esfandiari. Here’s what I’ve […]]]>

NOTE TO READERS: This week’s bulletin is released a day early to report on the strong reaction across Iran to the death of Mahsa Amini.

Welcome back to the Farda Briefing, an RFE/RL newsletter that follows the main issues in Iran and explains why they matter.

I am RFE/RL correspondent Golnaz Esfandiari. Here’s what I’ve been tracking over the past week and what I’m watching for in the days ahead.

The big problem

The death of a young woman following her arrest by Tehran vice police has sparked widespread outrage among Iranians while sparking several days of protests.

Mahsa Amini, 22, was arrested in Tehran on September 13 while visiting the capital with her family. She died three days later in a hospital after slipping into a coma while in the custody of police, who claimed she had suffered a heart attack while denying claims by activists that she had beaten as she was taken to the police station for “education.

Her family said Amini had no previous health issues. Her father, Amjad Amini, told an Iranian news site that witnesses saw her being pushed into a police car.

The government has ordered an investigation amid the social media furor, as well as several days of angry protests in his hometown of Saghez and a dozen other cities in Kurdistan of Iran as well as Tehran and Rasht, according to amateur videos posted online. Demonstrations also took place at several universities in the Iranian capital, Isfahan and Tabriz.

Why is this important: Amini’s death comes amid a tightening crackdown on hijab in Iran and increased pressure on women who flout the rules. Whether or not Amini was beaten, her tragic death brought to light decades of state harassment of women who do not fully adhere to hijab restrictions.

Many Iranians have in recent days called for the abolition of the morality police and an end to the hijab rule that became compulsory in 1981, two years after the Islamic revolution. In recent days, women protesting Amini’s death have taken off their headscarves in public and waved them defiantly, while some set them on fire to show their anger and opposition to forced hijab.

Justice, freedom and optional hijab“, as well as “Death to the dictator” were some of the chants of the demonstrators in the Iranian capital, where an iconic photo also shows a young woman burning her hijab and showing the victory sign while standing on a car.

And after: The institution used Obligate and internet disruption in an effort to end protests over Amini’s death, leading to calls for an end to the Islamic republic. State repression will only heighten anti-establishment sentiment, as well as growing public opposition to the morality police and hijab rule.

Calls for the truth about Amini’s death and for an independent investigation should also continue.

Stories you might have missed

• Iran’s Vice President for Women and Family Affairs, Ensieh Khazali, has been a strong supporter of increased online censorship and a crackdown on the use of virtual private networks (VPNs). But Khazali drew criticism after revealing that his son emigrated to Canada and started a business that sells VPNs. The revelation sparked calls for the resignation of the vice president.

• Iranian rights activist Melika Karagozlu was sentenced to three years and eight months in prison for protesting mandatory hijab rules, her lawyer said. Mohammad Ali Kamfiruzi, Qaragozlu’s lawyer, wrote on Twitter on September 19 that the Islamic Revolutionary Court in Tehran had recently sentenced his client for posting a few seconds of video of herself without a headscarf on social media. .

what we watch

Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi is in New York to attend the United Nations General Assembly. It is the first time Raisi has attended the annual event, where he has previously met French President Emmanuel Macron and is likely to hold talks with other world leaders. It will also be met with protests from opposition groups and Iranian expats angry at human rights abuses in the country and Amini’s death.

A Foreign Ministry spokesman said Sept. 19 that he cannot rule out the possibility that the Iranian delegation, which includes Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdolahian and chief nuclear negotiator Ali Bagheri Kani, have a meeting on reviving the 2015 nuclear deal on the sidelines of the UN meeting.

“We have not left the talks,” the Foreign Ministry spokesman said.

Why is this important: The UN meeting could provide a venue for diplomatic exchanges between Iran, the United States and EU countries on the renewal of the nuclear agreement. It comes amid an impasse in nuclear talks following Tehran’s latest response, which has been described by the US State Department as a “step backwards”.

That’s all about me for now. Don’t forget to send me your questions, comments or advice.

Until next time,

Golnaz Esfandiari

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Can you practice religion at school? What SC said about secularism https://imos-journal.net/can-you-practice-religion-at-school-what-sc-said-about-secularism/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 11:58:36 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/can-you-practice-religion-at-school-what-sc-said-about-secularism/ Does the right to practice one’s religion extend to school uniforms? That’s the question India’s Supreme Court asked when hearing a handful of petitions challenging the Karnataka High Court’s verdict refusing to lift the hijab ban in educational institutions in the state, “You may have a religious right to practice whatever you want to practice. […]]]>

Does the right to practice one’s religion extend to school uniforms? That’s the question India’s Supreme Court asked when hearing a handful of petitions challenging the Karnataka High Court’s verdict refusing to lift the hijab ban in educational institutions in the state,

“You may have a religious right to practice whatever you want to practice. But can you practice and enforce that right in a school that has a uniform as part of the attire you must wear? That will be the question,” said declared a bench. Judges Hemant Gupta and Sudhanshu Dhulia.

The Supreme Court observed that schools have a prescribed uniform and while everyone in India has the right to practice their religion, the question remains whether such practice included changes in the prescribed uniform.

The question brought back a familiar debate regarding the separation of religion and state and the extent to which the right to practice religion can be used by individuals.

Hijab ban in Karnataka

On February 5, 2022, the government of Karnataka ordered a ban on “wearing clothes that disturb equality, integrity and public order in schools and colleges”. The ban sparked community outrage and a series of protests from the Mulsim girls, some of whom even challenged the ban in the High Court.

In March, the Kerala High Court upheld the ban. The case has since gone to the Supreme Court. Critics of the ban argue that banning the hijab in schools not only contradicts every Indian’s constitutionally guaranteed right to religious freedom, but is also detrimental to the future of education for Muslim girls.

What is the rationale for a hijab ban?

Karnataka’s hijab ban ordinance specifically mentions “garments which disturb equality, integrity and public order in schools and colleges”.

Hearing the pleas challenging the ban, the SC made an important observation: “Can students wear whatever they want to school and shouldn’t religious practice be set aside?”

Students from several communities across India wear sports and multiple elements of religious symbolism and faith. The ‘kada’ and headdress (pagdi) worn by Sikh children, the tilak or shaved head worn by Hindus, the hijab or other forms of face covering by Muslim girls, crosses worn on chains by Christian students. Mustaches are also often worn by upper caste students in colleges as a sign of caste pride.

As the SC noted on Tuesday, “the state was careful not to prescribe a uniform but left the possibility for each institution to prescribe a uniform.” Would such a ban on hijab in public schools and colleges in Karnataka (as an expression of faith) also mean a ban on these other elements of religious faith? And how far will it extend? What about government institutions and offices?

The ban further raises the question whether wearing the hijab is an essential practice under Article 25 of the Constitution. While evading the question, the SC bench observed, “What we are saying is whether in a government institution you can insist on conducting your religious practice. Because the preamble says that ours is a secular country.

While advocating for the ban, Supplementary Solicitor General (ASG) KM Nataraj said: “Someone under the guise of their religious practice or their religious right cannot say that I have the right to do so, I want to violate the discipline of the school” Advocate General of Karnataka Prabhuling Navadg also noted that “this government order does not prohibit any of the rights of students.”

Religion, state and secularism

India is a secular nation with no state religion and hence any citizen residing in Indian Territory has the right to follow any religion. Separation between religion and state was seen as essential for the maintenance of secularism in the country.

However, India’s secularism does not completely separate religion and state. The Constitution authorized broad state interference in religious affairs, such as the constitutional abolition of untouchability, the opening of all Hindu temples to people of “lower caste”, etc. The degree of separation between state and religion has varied according to several courts and executive decrees in place since the birth of the Republic.

In education, public educational institutions are prohibited from providing religious instruction and article 27 of the constitution prohibits the use of taxpayers’ money for the promotion of any religion. Nevertheless, the state even promotes and funds the educational institutions of religious groups in India.

Although religion is not actively taught in public schools, religious practices such as prayers, the singing of Hindu shlokas and surya namaskar during morning assemblies, or the singing of Christmas carols and Christian hymns in Music lessons are common practice in public and private schools in Indian states, but critics say some religions are favored more than others.

Religion at school: secularism in France

The question of whether one can carry one’s religious freedom in places of education or work has arisen in countries like France where the state practices a fierce separation of religion and state. Since 2004, the French law on secularism and conspicuous religious symbols at school has prohibited the wearing of such objects in French public schools.

The law has come under heavy criticism in America, where public school students are allowed to wear religious symbols, including headscarves, Jewish skullcaps, Christian crosses, and more.

While the American vision is that of the port. religious articles in public schools can be allowed without violating the principles of religious freedom, but France does not think so. Proponents of banning the hijab in France had argued at the time of the ban’s implementation that such a law was consistent with the socio-political and cultural contexts of France at the time. France’s attachment to secularism has often made it the target of religious extremism. The attack on Charlie Hebdo in 2015 in response to a cartoon about the Prophet Muhammad, for example, led many French people to redouble their efforts on the need to maintain total secularism. However, critics have accused France of using sexuality as a veil to disguise xenophobia.

(With PTI entries)

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Iranian Hijab protester Rashno released on bail after being detained for more than two months https://imos-journal.net/iranian-hijab-protester-rashno-released-on-bail-after-being-detained-for-more-than-two-months/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 13:56:55 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/iranian-hijab-protester-rashno-released-on-bail-after-being-detained-for-more-than-two-months/ PRAGUE — Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba has called on the European Union to ban all Russians except political dissidents from traveling to the bloc, on the grounds that the unprovoked invasion of Moscow enjoys wide support in the country. Speaking to RFE/RL’s Ukrainian service on the sidelines of an informal meeting of EU foreign […]]]>

PRAGUE — Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba has called on the European Union to ban all Russians except political dissidents from traveling to the bloc, on the grounds that the unprovoked invasion of Moscow enjoys wide support in the country.

Speaking to RFE/RL’s Ukrainian service on the sidelines of an informal meeting of EU foreign ministers in Prague on August 30, Kuleba said Europe was deluding itself if it thought only the president Russian Vladimir Putin was responsible for the ongoing war, and not for large swathes of it. of Russian society.

“When asked on the streets, most Russians support Putin’s policies…so to call this war ‘Putin’s problem’ and not a problem of Russian society which primarily supports its president is an illusion,” Kuleba said.

WATCH: Ukraine’s foreign minister insists EU drop ‘illusions’ about welcoming Russian tourists

EU foreign and defense ministers are in the Czech capital to discuss additional sanctions against Russia, including a possible blanket ban on Russian travel to the bloc, as well as ways to help Ukraine to defend themselves six months after the start of the full-scale war.

Push for a visa ban has grown in recent weeks, particularly among central and eastern European countries, but has been pushed back by some heavyweight members. The measure must be approved by the 27 member states.

Hours before the meeting, France and Germany issued a joint document claiming that limiting visas for Russians would be counterproductive as the EU tries to win “the hearts and minds” of Russians who do not support not the invasion.

Kuleba said ‘true’ Russian opponents of Putin should be allowed to travel to the European Union as well as select others for ‘humanitarian’ reasons – a possible reference to those in need of medical care abroad – but dismissed the idea that going to the bloc would influence other Russians’ views on Putin or the war.

Kuleba argued that since the EU simplified visa requirements for Russians in 2007, Moscow has invaded Georgia and Ukraine, murdered political opponents in Europe and used its gas and oil as weapons against the bloc. .

“My question is, what is this transformative impact [of eased travel to the EU] practice? Maybe they should see what’s really going on and admit it’s just illusions,” he said.

Easy trips to Europe “didn’t help teach Russians to respect other people, other countries and other peoples”, he said.

The EU has since February tightened visa restrictions for Russians and banned Russian planes from its airspace, drastically reducing the number of visitors from the country entering the bloc.

Yet Russians, including some government officials and their relatives, are still arriving in EU states for holidays, and the number of Russians applying for visas to travel to the EU has increased.

Images of the regime’s elite like Liza Peskova, the daughter of Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov, who recently visited Greece, have fueled international resentment as Ukrainian losses and hardship mount.

Russians “have to choose,” Kuleba said: “If you support Putin, then stay in Russia and enjoy it; don’t use Europe to your advantage.”

He called the issue “a matter of self-respect” for Europeans, saying Putin had unleashed aggression not only against Ukraine but against the West more broadly.

“The only difference is that Putin attacks us with missiles and tanks. He attacks Europeans with energy prices, inflation, propaganda. But the goal is the same: to destroy the democratic world. “

During the 30-minute interview, Kuleba also touched on other major topics, including NATO membership, relations with Turkey and peace talks with Russia.

He said the administration of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy was working with the West to find a temporary solution to the country’s desire for a security guarantee.

Ukraine has been seeking to join NATO for years, but Washington and Brussels have repeatedly said Kyiv is not ready and years away in what experts say is the West’s attempt to postpone a decision and to avoid provoking Russia.

Kuleba said that after the invasion of Russia, it would be “indecent” if NATO again demanded that Ukraine go through “a long, endless process” before becoming a member of the alliance.

He said Kyiv welcomed Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s efforts to mediate, but said his call for talks between Zelenskiy and Putin was premature.

WATCH: ‘Tourism is not a fundamental right’: Romanian minister backs EU ban on Russian tourists

“We do not share the view that Russia is now ready for negotiations. All of Russia’s actions demonstrate that it believes in its war and seeks a military solution to the conflict.”

Kuleba reiterated that Ukraine would not compromise its territorial integrity to end the war and chastised foreigners for trying to pressure Kyiv to do so.

“I’m tired of their skepticism. These are all groups who never believed in Ukraine, who were in favor of semi-measures against Russia,” he said.

Kuleba described the victory as a three-step process: restoring Ukraine’s territorial integrity, prosecuting Russian war criminals and paying reparations, and publicly repenting Russia for its aggression against Israel. Ukraine, just as Germany had done after World War II.

“I continue to believe that the day will come when a Russian leader will come to Ukraine, kneel in front of the monument to the victims of Russian aggression and apologize to the Ukrainian people for all the harm that has been done to us. And when that happens, it will be the final victory of Ukraine.”

Nevertheless, he said, it may take generations for Ukraine to restore relations with Russia.

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Iranian rights activist allegedly assaulted by guard for wearing children’s hijab https://imos-journal.net/iranian-rights-activist-allegedly-assaulted-by-guard-for-wearing-childrens-hijab/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 15:00:07 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/iranian-rights-activist-allegedly-assaulted-by-guard-for-wearing-childrens-hijab/ NUR-SULTAN – Kazakhstan’s President Qasym-Zhomart Toqaev has called for a snap presidential election in the coming months in which he will seek a second term. In a September 1 annual address, Toqaev also proposed increasing the presidential term from five years to seven years while banning future presidents from running for more than one term. […]]]>

NUR-SULTAN – Kazakhstan’s President Qasym-Zhomart Toqaev has called for a snap presidential election in the coming months in which he will seek a second term.

In a September 1 annual address, Toqaev also proposed increasing the presidential term from five years to seven years while banning future presidents from running for more than one term.

“I propose that we hold snap presidential elections in the fall of 2022,” Toqaev told parliament, saying steps were needed to “strengthen our state” and “maintain the momentum of reforms.”

Toqaev also called for early parliamentary elections to be held in the first half of 2023. He said the elections would be held for both the Mazhilis, the lower house of parliament, and the maslikhats, the local councils at all levels.

A presidential vote was scheduled in Kazakhstan in 2024 and parliamentary elections in 2025. To call an election, parliament must approve such a proposal and then forward it to the Central Election Commission, which officially sets the date.

Toqaev’s statement comes as human rights groups and political activists in the Central Asian nation demand a full investigation into violent nationwide protests that rocked the country in early January. Some 238 people, including 19 law enforcement officers, were killed in the unrest.

Protesters burst into the mayor’s office in Almaty on January 5 and set fire to it and nearby vehicles amid unrest that has spread across Kazakhstan over rising prices fuel.

Many people in Kazakhstan, including relatives of those killed during the unrest, have demanded an explanation from Toqaev about his decision to invite Russian-led troops from the Collective Security Treaty Organization to break up the protests, as well than on his audience “shoot to kill without warning”.

The unrest came after a peaceful protest in the western region of Manghystau on January 2 over a fuel price hike sparked deep resentment against the country’s leadership, leading to widespread anti-government protests.

Thousands of people were detained by officials during and after the protests, which Toqaev said were caused by “20,000 terrorists” from abroad, a claim for which authorities have provided no evidence.

Human rights groups have provided evidence that peaceful protesters and people who had nothing to do with the protests were among those killed by law enforcement and military personnel.

In his September 1 speech, Toqaev announced that all those arrested or convicted for participating in the January unrest, as well as law enforcement officers arrested for beating and torturing detained protesters, will be granted clemency.

“The amnesty will not affect the main suspects accused of organizing the unrest, as well as those accused of high treason and attempted seizure of power,” Toqaev said. He gave no other details such as the names of those suspects or the exact number of people arrested during and after the unrest.

The former head of Kazakhstan’s National Security Committee, Karim Masimov, who was a close associate of Toqaev’s predecessor, Nursultan Nazarbaev, and three of his ex-deputies were arrested after the unrest and charged with high treason.

Karimov’s fourth deputy, Samat Abish, who is a nephew of Nazarbaev, was questioned and identified as someone interested in the case.

Nazarbaev ruled Kazakhstan for nearly three decades before stepping down in March 2019 and choosing his longtime ally Toqaev as his successor.

Yet he retained sweeping powers as head of the Security Council, enjoying substantial powers with the title “elbasy” or head of the nation.

In June of the same year, Toqaev was declared the winner of a snap presidential election that was followed by protests in the country’s financial capital, Almaty, and other cities claiming the ballot was rigged.

Following the January unrest, Toqaev stripped Nazarbaev of his role on the Security Council, taking him on himself. Since then, several relatives and allies of Nazarbaev have been removed from their posts or resigned. Some have been arrested for corruption.

In June of that year, a referendum initiated by Toqaev removed Nazarbaev’s name from the constitution and nullified his status as an elbasy.

Kazakh critics say Toqaev’s moves were mostly cosmetic and would not change the nature of the autocratic system in a country plagued by years of rampant corruption and nepotism.

In his annual address, Toqaev said he would suspend until 2028 a program gradually raising the retirement age for women from 58 to that of men, which is 63.

The statement appears to be a response to numerous protests by feminist activists in several major cities in recent weeks demanding the cancellation of the program.

Upcoming elections, the date of which has not yet been set, should strengthen Toqaev’s mandate as an independent leader, if he wins.

Kazakhstan, an oil-rich and tightly controlled former Soviet republic of some 19 million people, has never held a presidential election deemed free and fair by Western observers.

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Hijab rules for visitors to Iran https://imos-journal.net/hijab-rules-for-visitors-to-iran/ Sat, 20 Aug 2022 09:59:28 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/hijab-rules-for-visitors-to-iran/ Question: I plan to visit Iran before the end of the summer and I don’t know what to wear? Answer: Dress codes for female visitors are specific and defined and there are certain guidelines which we will explain. A head scarf is required by law, while it is best to avoid showing arm skin on […]]]>

Question: I plan to visit Iran before the end of the summer and I don’t know what to wear?

Answer: Dress codes for female visitors are specific and defined and there are certain guidelines which we will explain. A head scarf is required by law, while it is best to avoid showing arm skin on legs when entering the airport, even if you are a foreigner.

After the 1979 revolution in Iran, new Islamic laws required women to wear the hijab outdoors. Since then, all women wear the hijab in public places. Additionally, international visitors are required to dress as Iranian residents. In recent years, coat fashion has shifted from tight-fitting coats to looser garments (better in the heat). There are several online stores to find styles like this before you hover.

How to cover yourself in Iran?

The coat. This word from French has become one of the most common forms of cover for women in Iran in recent years. The loose long coat (best in summer) effectively acts as a cover for your usual tops and pants.

You will see women dressed in full black capes called “tchador” literally meaning tent. As a visitor, you don’t have to cover up like this if you don’t want to, and it’s often reserved for the more pious women in Iranian society.

There are a few exceptions to this rule, notably in the cities of Qom and Mashhad and shrines, where it is advisable to wear a larger blanket such as a chador at shrines.

Sandals and flip flops (jandels for you Australians) without socks are acceptable for women and men and you don’t need to cover your toes.

Covering inside

In commercial places like malls, women are always expected to wear a headscarf and a coat, while inside houses, a blanket is less expected except in a religious household.

Hijab for female tourists in Iran

As stated above, visitors must abide by hijab laws. But most of the time they don’t have to wear it as strictly as Iranians. But remember, in holy places such as Imam Reza Holy Shrine, Fatima Masumeh Shrine or Jamkaran Mosque in Qom, wear a chador.

burka in iran

The use of the burqa is very unusual in Iran. There is a type of veil in the south of the country that is found in the province of Hormozgan, but if you visit cities and tourist areas of the country, you are unlikely to encounter this style. If you visit Hormozgan, you will find women wearing boregheh which is like a mask! Very exotic even for most Iranians.

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