French council – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 09:51:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://imos-journal.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon.png French council – IMOS Journal http://imos-journal.net/ 32 32 Azerbaijan rejects Armenia’s baseless accusations in UN Security Council – French media https://imos-journal.net/azerbaijan-rejects-armenias-baseless-accusations-in-un-security-council-french-media/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 07:15:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/azerbaijan-rejects-armenias-baseless-accusations-in-un-security-council-french-media/ By trend French online newspaper Lagazetteaz.fr published an article titled “Azerbaijan rejects Armenia’s baseless accusations before the UN Security Council, convened by France,” Trend reports. The article states that Azerbaijan resolutely denied the baseless allegations made by the Armenian representative during the September 16 session, stating that these accusations testified to Armenia’s unwillingness to fulfill […]]]>

By trend

French online newspaper Lagazetteaz.fr published an article titled “Azerbaijan rejects Armenia’s baseless accusations before the UN Security Council, convened by France,” Trend reports.

The article states that Azerbaijan resolutely denied the baseless allegations made by the Armenian representative during the September 16 session, stating that these accusations testified to Armenia’s unwillingness to fulfill its international obligations for peace, stability and cooperation in the region.

“It is ironic to see Armenia, which has occupied the territories of Azerbaijan for 30 years and practiced ethnic cleansing, now claiming principles which it continues to violate and appealing to the Security Council, whose country refuses to implement the resolutions, hoping that its impunity will last forever,” the article quoted Azerbaijan’s permanent representative to the UN, Yashar Aliyev.

By resorting to political and military provocations on the border, Armenia tries to evade the application of the agreements signed between the two countries, to hinder the normalization of interstate relations, to involve third parties in the settlement of problems bilateral, to expand the area of ​​tension to support its territory claims and ideas of revenge.

“Azerbaijan is a supporter of regional peace, stability and development. Building neighborly relations between Armenia and Azerbaijan is the key to creating a secure, sustainable and prosperous future in the Caucasus. South through full-fledged normalization of relations,” the article said. .

The article also covered that the delimitation and demarcation of borders, as well as the opening of transport communication through the activities of a bilateral commission, are two directions in the process of interstate normalization.

In addition, the article pointed out that it was Azerbaijan that initiated the process of normalization of interstate relations with Armenia, based on mutual recognition and respect for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Armenia. each other within internationally recognized borders, as well as the signing of a peace treaty based on these principles.

Follow us on twitter @AzerNewsAz

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Refugee Council’s Enver Solomon: ‘Leadership is something you are constantly trying to improve’ https://imos-journal.net/refugee-councils-enver-solomon-leadership-is-something-you-are-constantly-trying-to-improve/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 04:01:54 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/refugee-councils-enver-solomon-leadership-is-something-you-are-constantly-trying-to-improve/ Since Enver Solomon became chief executive of the Refugee Council in December 2020, Kabul has fallen to the Taliban and Russia has invaded Ukraine, both causing a flood of refugees. Twenty-seven people, including three children, drowned when their boat capsized while crossing from France to England last November. The UK Parliament passed the Nationality and […]]]>

Since Enver Solomon became chief executive of the Refugee Council in December 2020, Kabul has fallen to the Taliban and Russia has invaded Ukraine, both causing a flood of refugees. Twenty-seven people, including three children, drowned when their boat capsized while crossing from France to England last November. The UK Parliament passed the Nationality and Borders Act, which penalizes asylum seekers who do not come to Britain directly from their home country. And the British government has launched its plan to deport migrants to Rwanda – although this is currently being challenged in the High Court.

“It’s been an amazing time,” Solomon said. He had been warned that the work of the British refugees would be intense. “But it hasn’t been like other periods lately.”

We talk in his North London home kitchen. The primary school class photo and the multiplication charts taped to the walls speak of a domestic normality far removed from the terror of those who risk their lives to reach British shores.

Channel crossings – more than 28,000 people have made the crossing in small boats so far this year – have given much of the impetus to recent actions by the UK government. But while Solomon describes the Nationality and Borders Act as “one of the most important pieces of asylum, refugee and immigration legislation for many, many years” and the Rwandan plan as “a watershed moment “, the effective outsourcing of an important government role to another country, he says it would be wrong to ignore people’s concerns about increased Channel crossings.

“It’s not right to go on the radio and say the number of people trying to come to the UK is not a problem. Because then people won’t immediately engage with you if they think it’s a problem. So you have to think very carefully about how you communicate.

The Refugee Council – an independent charity established in 1951 – provided support, employment assistance and English and vocational training to 15,000 refugees last year. He also campaigns for a more humane approach to those who have fled their country. Solomon thinks that 25-30% of the British population is pro-refugee. A similar number oppose it implacably. His goal is to reach out to the middle 40-50%, the people he calls “persuasive,” who worry about numbers but often support refugees in their own communities.

What does it say to those who are truly perplexed by the thought of people making life-threatening journeys to the UK from France, a safe and democratic country? Many of those risking the crossing have family or friends in the UK, he says. France has nearly twice as many asylum seekers as the UK; Germany three times. We must also remember that most refugees do not make it to France or the UK. The greatest number are found in neighboring countries: Ukrainians in Poland, Afghans in Pakistan, Syrians in Lebanon.

How would he manage the Channel crossings? This requires painstaking and patient work, he says: easing restrictions on family reunifications, providing humanitarian visas and working with French authorities against smuggling gangs. “But there is no single magic silver bullet. And that’s the problem: the government gets restless and it’s over-promising and ultimately under-delivering.

Solomon’s journey to leadership began when, after a decade as a BBC journalist, he decided to become more involved in the causes he had created programs about. He did a series of jobs in prison reform and children’s charities, some in team leadership positions. In 2018, he became Managing Director of Just for Kids Law, which provides legal support and advocacy to young people.

He had been preparing for this first role as general manager for some time, working with an executive coach. “I am a big fan [of coaching] because I think leadership is something you’re constantly trying to improve,” he says. “It’s something you never master. You are always trying to learn, to absorb, to think about it differently. It gives you incredible insight into yourself as a person.

Three questions to Enver Solomon

Who is your leadership hero?

Pep Guardiola. I used to go watch Manchester City when I was a kid and we always lost. I thought about what can be learned from Guardiola’s leadership style. When Man City lose or do poorly, the first thing they say is how brilliant their players are. He will never, never openly criticize them. And he’s always trying to think about how they can be better. He’s one of the best of his generation, but he’s quite modest about it.

What was the first leadership lesson you learned?

When I worked with Martin Nary when he was General Manager of Barnardo’s, I learned that leadership is about being brilliant with people. Martin has always been interested in building relationships, giving people time, and being nice. And he was always interested in thinking about how he communicated as a leader, internally and externally. In the voluntary sector, I don’t think we think enough about the importance of being both an external communicator and an internal communicator. If we want to advance our cause, we really need to think about how we talk about it publicly.

If you weren’t CEO, what would you be?

I would probably still be a journalist. Many people in the voluntary sector see journalists as the opposition. When I worked in prison reform and criminal justice, there were people in the industry who hated the media, who thought they all believed in locking everyone up. We know we should engage with politicians, policy makers and funders. We should consider journalists and publishers of national newspapers as equally important.

To be a great leader, he believes the biggest challenge is “you have to think about who you are as a person. And it can take you to places you might not have explored before.”

He says, for example, that leadership is “relational.” “It’s about how you react to other people. So how you might react to conflict, or how you might react to difficult situations, is a reflection of who you are as a person. It comes from childhood experiences, how you parented, your own relationships,” he says. If you respond to someone who challenges your leadership defensively, it may be because of how things have gone in your own family.

He says that when he started leading teams, he was less open to understanding who he was as a person and less open to understanding how to react to people. “It really got me thinking about how I deal with challenges and how you can’t just push your point of view,” he adds. “You have to try to listen to people, you have to understand where they come from.”

Where Solomon is from is one of the reasons he applied to lead the Refugee Council. His father’s family consisted of Jewish refugees who arrived in Merseyside from Eastern Europe around the turn of the 20th century. His maternal grandmother, an Indian Muslim from Gujarat, was sent to South Africa for an arranged marriage. The family there were anti-apartheid activists. Solomon’s mother, born in Johannesburg, worked as a social worker with Winnie Mandela in Soweto before emigrating to the UK, where she met her father, also a social worker and later lecturer.

Growing up mixed race in Manchester, Solomon says he was teased at school. Today, his surname attracts anti-Semitic comments on Twitter. As a journalist, he downplayed his Métis heritage. “When I was at the BBC, I was determined not to be the community affairs reporter reporting on race and race relations.” But when he arrived at the Refugee Council, he felt it was important to identify himself as its first ethnic minority chief executive.

“I haven’t been through the asylum system, but I have refugee blood, if you will, or the history of it in my family. It is important that you are not white in this sector, because race is an issue. The racialized nature of our approach to asylum, refugees and immigration in this country is very important. So suddenly I found myself in a role where it matters and I should be proud of it and talk about it.

As for how he speaks to this middle group of “persuaders,” he adds that they care about fairness and efficiency. “People think it’s absolutely right that people be treated fairly and given a fair hearing. People are also very attached to the idea that there should be order,” he says.

That there are more than 100,000 people waiting for a decision, that tens of thousands are waiting more than six months and thousands are waiting two, three years or even up to five years, it is, he says , chaotic. “And people want a system that’s efficient and orderly and works well – just like they do with any utility.”

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Agenda of the municipal council of 09/15/22 | Syndicated content https://imos-journal.net/agenda-of-the-municipal-council-of-09-15-22-syndicated-content/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 20:44:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/agenda-of-the-municipal-council-of-09-15-22-syndicated-content/ The Bloomfield City Council will meet at 7 p.m. on September 15 at the Bloomfield Public Library. The agenda includes a public hearing to approve an ordinance amending Chapter 122 of the city code by modifying licensing exemptions for transient merchants. The hearing will be followed by a vote of approval on first reading and […]]]>

The Bloomfield City Council will meet at 7 p.m. on September 15 at the Bloomfield Public Library. The agenda includes a public hearing to approve an ordinance amending Chapter 122 of the city code by modifying licensing exemptions for transient merchants. The hearing will be followed by a vote of approval on first reading and a vote of disapproval on second and third readings of the order. Other agenda items include updates from the Chief of Police, Chief of Fire, Main Street and DCDC; authorize the Mayor to sign the Scope of Commitment to the Fowler Development Agreement; authorize the mayor to sign an agreement for the retail frontage grant improvement project; discuss and decide on the addition of an additional police officer; Update on Chapter 75 or the ATV and ORV Ordinance by Don Walton and Zach Dunlavy; approve the updated quote for the repair of the bucket truck; endorse the Clean Energy Week Proclamation; discuss the PAYS program with Jeff Geerts of IEDA; approve the salary estimate of $78,275 for the work done on bioretention cell #2; approve tobacco/steam license for Family Dollar; discuss and decide on Dollar Tree’s invoice discount request; approve the additional closure of streets on September 24 for the unloading of pumpkins; approve the appointment of new volunteer firefighter John Miller; approve engineering services agreements with French-Reneker for the extension of the sanitary sewers on Arkansas, Davis, North and Columbia streets and for the replacement of the storm sewers on Walnut Street; approve the estimate of $8,725 for Cody’s Tree Service to cut down and clean up trees at four locations; discuss and decide whether to remove imprisonment as a penalty for violating a municipal ordinance; approve the French-Reneker invoice of $21,824.01 for engineering services for street improvements; reports from the City Administrator, DPW, Director of Community Development, Council updates and comments from the Mayor.

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The Paris City Council is considering an increase in the tax on the wealthiest tourists https://imos-journal.net/the-paris-city-council-is-considering-an-increase-in-the-tax-on-the-wealthiest-tourists/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 06:30:16 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/the-paris-city-council-is-considering-an-increase-in-the-tax-on-the-wealthiest-tourists/ The city of Paris is considering a tax on wealthy tourists. In a recent report, the city council recommended a higher tax on vacant homes and offices, and on wealthier visitors, which would require legislative intervention. While the city assesses the cost of the health crisis in France at 1.2 billion euros, between loss of […]]]>

The city of Paris is considering a tax on wealthy tourists. In a recent report, the city council recommended a higher tax on vacant homes and offices, and on wealthier visitors, which would require legislative intervention.

While the city assesses the cost of the health crisis in France at 1.2 billion euros, between loss of earnings and additional expenses, “the current system of taxation of local authorities is at the end of its tether, and must be reformed from urgently,” said Nicolas Bonnet-Oulaldj, CEO. of the Socialist Party, and Paul Simondon, deputy mayor of Paris in Anne Hidalgo’s finance department.

Among these, three are housing incentives: the launch of an additional tax on vacant offices, the increase in the tax on vacant housing (at least four times) or even the lifting of the ceiling on the tax increase. housing on second homes in tight areas. Others are aimed at the wealthiest tourists, with a removal of the ceiling on the tourist tax on luxury hotels and palaces.

The idea is to better tax the profits of multinationals based in Paris and to make the digital economy and the delivery sector contribute more.

Paul Simondon, Deputy Mayor of Paris

Meanwhile, the mayor of Cannes, David Lisanard openly invites businessmen to settle in the city in the south of France. He made the Paris tax project on large companies an opportunity to attract companies. “Come to Cannes,” Lisanard wrote on his Twitter account.

“Fiscal attractiveness and quality of life. Ideal for creating jobs and wealth, making profit, investing, innovating. The services of Cannes Lérins Agglomeration and the town hall of Cannes are at your disposal, in particular for the provision of land and real estate, ”writes Lisanard.

The administration of Anne Hidalgo in Paris criticizes the government for a lack of financial support since the health crisis. She advocates a “national reflection in order to better tax the profits of multinationals based in Paris” and to make the digital economy and the delivery profession contribute more through the creation of a tax on delivery fleets or delivered products. .

For Simondon, incentive tax tools can “be shared very widely by elected officials” of all stripes, including conservative mayors “in cities where the housing situation is very tight”. If the loss of fiscal autonomy is the subject of a unanimous observation of elected officials, whatever their political color in France, the capital has experienced an “amplified impact of the crisis” and there is a “Parisian specificity on taxes residence and secondary residences”. Bonnet-Oulaldj told the AFP news agency.

Deputy Mayor Simondon assures that some of the measures presented are “applicable from 2023” if a parliamentary majority is reached on the subject. “The tourist tax costs nothing to the State, nor to the working classes”, declared Bonnet-Oulaldj, for whom these are measures of social justice.

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National League back as National Police Chiefs Council issues statement on football https://imos-journal.net/national-league-back-as-national-police-chiefs-council-issues-statement-on-football/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 15:54:10 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/national-league-back-as-national-police-chiefs-council-issues-statement-on-football/ The Saints are due to travel to Villa Park on Friday September 16 but are awaiting a Premier League decision. The NATIONAL League is leading the way as the National Police Chiefs Council ‘work closely together’ to ensure football can take place ahead of a potential return to the Premier League this week. All football […]]]>

The Saints are due to travel to Villa Park on Friday September 16 but are awaiting a Premier League decision.

The NATIONAL League is leading the way as the National Police Chiefs Council ‘work closely together’ to ensure football can take place ahead of a potential return to the Premier League this week.

All football matches at all levels were postponed last weekend following the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday afternoon.

Meanwhile, other sports like rugby and cricket continued on Saturday – although all of Friday was postponed.

The DCMS guidelines made it clear that there was no obligation for sports bodies to cancel events, leaving that to their discretion. The Premier League met on Friday morning and announced their decision, followed by the rest of the pyramid.

Now the National League has publicly revealed its intention to continue with the schedule as usual from tomorrow, while Premier League clubs await their decision.

The clubs, for all matches until the funeral, will observe a minute’s silence before the match and will wear black armbands as a sign of respect for Her Majesty.

The National Police Chiefs’ Council said in a statement that a national police operation had been activated and that British police were working closely with other organizations to ensure the events were carried out “safely and with appropriate security”.

The NPCC added: “Following the decisions of the Premier League and the English Football League to cancel matches this weekend, we will work with football clubs to try to ensure that, where possible, football matches can be played safely when balanced against the requirement to support national events and ensure day-to-day policing.

“This is a unique situation and we are working closely with everyone involved.”

Rangers’ Champions League draw with Napoli, originally scheduled for Tuesday September 13, has been rescheduled for Wednesday September 14.

UEFA cited “serious police resource limitations and organizational problems related to the ongoing events surrounding the national mourning” for the Queen as the reason for the decision to postpone.

Away supporters will not be permitted at either stage as UEFA ‘urges supporters not to travel and to respect this extraordinary situation’.

Saints are due to travel to Aston Villa’s Villa Park on Friday September 16 (8pm) but are awaiting a decision from the Premier League on scheduling.

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Council seeks artist to design and install Frederick Douglass sculpture https://imos-journal.net/council-seeks-artist-to-design-and-install-frederick-douglass-sculpture/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 09:43:26 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/council-seeks-artist-to-design-and-install-frederick-douglass-sculpture/ Belfast City Council is looking for an artist to design and install a sculpture of abolitionist and campaigner Frederick Douglass. Douglass was a former slave who became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in America. He first visited Belfast in 1845 at the invitation of the Belfast Anti-Slavery Society and returned for a second […]]]>

Belfast City Council is looking for an artist to design and install a sculpture of abolitionist and campaigner Frederick Douglass.

Douglass was a former slave who became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in America. He first visited Belfast in 1845 at the invitation of the Belfast Anti-Slavery Society and returned for a second visit in 1846.

The nominated artist will be required to design and produce a permanent figurative sculpture, life-size or larger, to be installed on Rosemary Street downtown, subject to obtaining planning permission.

The project is funded by Belfast City Council and the Department of Communities.

Mayor of Belfast, Councilor Christina Black, said: “Frederick Douglass is an inspiring historical figure, famous for his oratorical and anti-slavery writings. He delivered at least 11 lectures during his four weeks in Belfast in 1845, including in Rosemary Street Presbyterian Church, close to where the sculpture is planned to be installed.

“Douglass was 27 when he visited Ireland so it is fitting that the statue depicts him at that age. I am sure the project will help to increase footfall in this part of the city center as locals and tourists interested in Douglass and his campaign in this part of the world, visit the sculpture.”

Artist sourcing is a two-step process, with initial expressions of interest due by September 16, 2022.

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Theater companies, musicians, museums among groups receiving Arts Council grants https://imos-journal.net/theater-companies-musicians-museums-among-groups-receiving-arts-council-grants/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 19:52:30 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/theater-companies-musicians-museums-among-groups-receiving-arts-council-grants/ Theater companies, music groups, museums and other arts programs have recently received grants from the Fayetteville-Cumberland County Arts Council, many to support their 2022-23 performing seasons.Other nonprofit groups and individual artists received “mini-grants” for art projects through December.Bob Pinson, interim president and CEO of the Arts Council, said in a press release that the funding […]]]>

Theater companies, music groups, museums and other arts programs have recently received grants from the Fayetteville-Cumberland County Arts Council, many to support their 2022-23 performing seasons.
Other nonprofit groups and individual artists received “mini-grants” for art projects through December.
Bob Pinson, interim president and CEO of the Arts Council, said in a press release that the funding was being channeled to a wide range of arts organizations.

“…We are penetrating deeper into previously underserved areas of our community, as evidenced by the many new applicants this year,” Pinson said.
In 2021-22, the Arts Council distributed nearly $1 million in grants to nonprofit arts and culture organizations, artists and municipalities in Cumberland County, according to the release.

Theater companies

14aThe Gilbert Theater received a $30,000 grant to support its new season. Shows scheduled for 2022-23 are “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance”, “The Sound of Music”, “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)”, “All in the Timing” and “[title of show].”

“As we rush into our 30th season, I can only hope that we will be able to secure and expand the legacy left to us by Lynn Pryer,” artistic director Lawrence Carlisle III said in a statement. Press.
Pryer was the founder of the Gilbert Theatre.

14bShakespeare sweet tea received a $27,500 grant for its new season. The funding, according to a press release, includes Green Tea, a Shakespeare company for young people.
The next season of Sweet Tea includes “Richard III,” which will take place in October in Raleigh; “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”, scheduled for January in Fayetteville; “Twelfth Night,” slated for June in Fayetteville; “Jane Eyre,” June in Raleigh; and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, July in Raleigh.

The Cumberland County Public Library received a $9,000 grant for its 14th annual Cumberland County Storytelling Festival, scheduled for March 1-31.

“Storytelling and music allow listeners of all ages to use their imaginations as they explore, discover and learn,” Library Director Faith Phillips said in a press release.

Museums and galleries

Cape Fear Studios received a $7,200 grant to help with a 32nd season of art exhibits that includes the National 2D Competition, the Alpha Romeo Tango Call for Military Artists, and Cabin Fever, among others.

14cA $3,500 cultural tourism grant will support “Courage and Compassion: The Legacy of the Bielski Brothers,” a temporary exhibit at Airborne and Special Operations Museum.

“On loan from the Florida Holocaust Museum, ‘Courage and Compassion’ is a multimedia exhibit showcasing the heroic efforts of three brothers who helped save more than 1,200 people from the Nazis during World War II as they took refuge in the forests surrounding Novogrudok, Belarus,” says Renee Lane, executive director of the downtown museum, in a press release. “The Bielski brothers led the group in acts of sabotage and defense against the Nazis and through their leadership, the group survived famine, harsh winters, and the threat of the Nazis and their collaborators.”

The exhibition is on loan until November 3.

“Given world events in Eastern Europe,” Lane says, “it’s very timely.”

14dThe Cape Fear Historical Complex Museum Foundation received an $11,000 grant to support its “History LIVE! to the 1897 Poe House series,” which includes historical re-enactments, artist demonstrations, musical performances and live theater. Additionally, the museum received $5,000 for its monthly “History-to-Go” kits, which are free for children visiting the museum.

“The Canada Council grant allows us to provide engaging historical entertainment by incorporating living historians, artists and performers representing the diversity of our community and our collective history. Grants and other donations allow us to offer this programming at no or minimal cost to the public,” History LIVE! said coordinator Megan Maxwell in a press release.

Other museum programs supported by the Arts Council grant include “Hallowe’en Revels: Night Tours of the 1897 Poe House,” scheduled for October 20-22 and October 27-28; “Trick or Treat at the Poe House,” Oct. 29, with a magic show, wagon rides, and carnival games; “Holiday Jubilee”, December 4, with the Coventry Carolers and Cross Creek Chordsmen; and a new program, “A Night of Mystery,” which will be presented in April 2023 in partnership with Théâtre Gilbert.

Music sets

14thCumberland Choral ArtsThe 31st season, “Connections,” received an $8,000 grant, according to a press release.

“The Arts Council’s continued support over 31 years has enabled the CCA to pursue its mission of providing exceptional choral music to Fayetteville and the surrounding Sandhills area,” said CCA President Sandy Cage. , in a press release.

The choral group performs four concerts a year at local venues and extends its reach throughout Cumberland County through its affiliates Campbellton Youth Choir.
The concerts scheduled for the coming year are “The Sacred Veil”, October 15; “The Messiah” with the Fayetteville Symphony Orchestra, December 10; “Lift Every Voice and Sing”, in February; “Ear Candy! That’s what we’re doing,” March 24; and “The World Beloved: A Bluegrass Mass,” May 20.

An additional grant of $3,500 was awarded to support the Campbellton Youth Chorus program for ages 9-14 in Cumberland County.
The choir gives young singers the opportunity to learn and play music with children from other neighborhoods, schools, traditions and faiths, according to a press release from Cumberland Choral Arts.

Cultural groups

The Culture and Heritage Alliance received a $12,150 grant to support the sixth annual Africa World Peace Festival, scheduled for September 9-11 in the downtown Cool Spring neighborhood. In a press release, the group says it celebrates all cultures with a focus on Africa through exhibitions of music, dance, food and art.

The festival will run from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. on September 9, from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. on September 10 and from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on September 11. A 5km/10km peace run will start at 7 am on September 10 in the city centre; prior registration is required. The festival will include four activity zones: Kids Zone with games, puzzles and a climbing wall; an arts and crafts area with artisan vendors and workshops; music
by local bands and African drummers; and a food court.

film festival

14gGroundSwell Pictures received an $11,700 grant to support the seventh annual Indigo Moon Film Festival, scheduled for Oct. 7-9 in historic downtown Fayetteville. The festival will feature more than 60 films, Q&A sessions with filmmakers and special events, organizers said.
“We are very grateful for the support from the Arts Council, especially this year,” said Jan Johnson, co-founder of the festival. “We are planning a great post-pandemic in-person festival, and with the support of the Arts Council, IMFF will be back in-person with the excellent programming and events it has become synonymous with.

Cycle of “mini-grants”

In July, the Arts Council awarded $31,801 in grants to six nonprofit organizations and nine individual artists in Cumberland County for local arts projects scheduled through December.
A total of 43 applications were submitted requesting over $80,000 to fund arts, culture and history projects. A panel of artists chaired by Kenjuana McCray reviewed the applications and recommended the award of 15 grants.

The total of $31,801 is the highest amount awarded in a single round of mini-grants, said Sarah Busman, head of arts education for the Arts Council, in a press release.

“These projects demonstrate the artistic excellence and innovation that we consider two of our core values,” Busman said.

The mini-grants program, created in 2019, awards $500 to $3,000 to arts programs and is supported in part by the City of Fayetteville, Cumberland County and the NC Arts Council. The next application deadline is September 15.

Nonprofit mini-grant projects approved in July include:
Fayetteville After Five of the Fayetteville Dogwood Festival summer concert series, supporting the July 15 performance of the Throwback Collaboration Band.
· First Nations Tribal Youth Development Society. for his Aboriginal arts class for young people at the Stoney Point Recreation Center. The weekly class teaches young people about Aboriginal culture and arts. The grant will help purchase art materials for her drum-making class.
Holy Trinity Episcopal Church Intermediate Art Serieswhich offers concerts, visual art installations and dance performances.
Latinos United for Progress for the launch of the cultural video series “Historias Latinas en Fayetteville”. It will feature cultural stories from the Latino community of Fayetteville.
Lafayette Company of Fayetteville for its annual Lafayette French music concert, scheduled for September 8.
ServiceSource for her Bloom art therapy program which helps adults with disabilities develop their creativity and self-esteem.
Approved Contract Artist Mini-Grants include:
All American jazz collectivesfor his August 6 “Jazz and Art Concert” featuring jazz musicians and singers.
The singer Frances Ellerbewho conducts a weekly community choir rehearsal at Fort Bragg’s Main Post Chapel culminating in a performance on November 6.
Author Mary J. Ferguson, who will lead a two-hour poetry reading and a class on creative and autobiographical poetry based on his poem “2020”.
Angelicia Hicksa theater artist who will present a reading of original monologues.
Matthew Jacksona producer who launches monthly Fayetteville Comedy Night featuring local comedians.
Tatiana Plessan actress and theater scholar who will use her connection with the Fayetteville Cumberland Reentry Council to create The Fourth Wall, a theater company for formerly incarcerated people.
Joanice Serraoa designer who will use her “Coal Miners” fashion collection to teach a six-course community sewing class.
Meredith Taliana visual artist who produces “The Fayetteville Little Art Box”, a free mini-gallery that mimics the Little Free Library program.
Ayana Washingtonwho hosted Book Black Women’s “The Blueprint” concert on August 13.

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Former Sudbury college principal joins research council https://imos-journal.net/former-sudbury-college-principal-joins-research-council/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/former-sudbury-college-principal-joins-research-council/ Dr. Robin Craig moved to the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Dr. Robin Craig has joined the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) as Associate Vice-President of the Research Grants and Scholarships Directorate. A federal government department, NSERC funds science and innovation across Canada. Craig previously served as the first Director of Research […]]]>

Dr. Robin Craig moved to the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Dr. Robin Craig has joined the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) as Associate Vice-President of the Research Grants and Scholarships Directorate.

A federal government department, NSERC funds science and innovation across Canada.

Craig previously served as the first Director of Research & Innovation Boréal, the applied research arm of Collège Boréal in Sudbury, a position she held since 2019.

NSERC made the announcement on August 29.

“With more than 10 years of experience administering research and innovation programs, Dr. Craig brings to NSERC significant knowledge of the research ecosystem and federal funding agencies,” noted the board. in a press release.

“Robin is passionate about multidisciplinary research collaborations and throughout her career has prioritized inclusive training and mentorship to advance the career goals of students and highly qualified staff.”

Prior to joining NSERC, Craig was the first Director of Boreal Research and Innovation at Collège Boréal, where she led the strategic development of the college’s applied research and innovation portfolio. In this role, she established the college’s Office of Research Services and developed an extensive network of research partnerships with industry and community organizations to enhance knowledge transfer and commercialization and create opportunities for experiential learning. .

Craig has served on several advisory committees, including NSERC’s Advisory Committee on the Evolution of the College and Community Innovation Program and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Board of Trustees.

In addition, she has served on the Executive of the Heads of Applied Research of Ontario, the Advisory Committee of the Consortium national de formation en santé (CNFS)-Volet Laurentienne and the Advisory Committee of Northern Ontario of Bioenterprise Canada.

Prior to joining Collège Boréal, Robin held academic and administrative positions at Laurentian University beginning in 2007. As a member of the Office of Research Services, she contributed to the intensity and visibility of the university research by supporting faculty and students in coordinating research funding applications and knowledge mobilization activities. In this role, she also advised senior management on strategic research initiatives and facilitated the work of the institution’s research ethics board.

Subsequently, she held the position of Senior Manager of Programs and Knowledge Translation at the Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

Craig holds a Ph.D. and MA in French from Western University and an Honors BA from the University of Toronto.

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The Federal Council has nothing to do with witches https://imos-journal.net/the-federal-council-has-nothing-to-do-with-witches/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 10:28:18 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/the-federal-council-has-nothing-to-do-with-witches/ 1/6 The Anna Goldie Museum in Glarus commemorates the woman who was the last woman exposed to witchcraft in Switzerland. Under torture, he admitted to using the powers of Satan. In 1782, a court in Glarus sentenced Anna Goldie to death by sword for witchcraft. Allegation: The maid allegedly stuck a pin several times in […]]]>

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The Anna Goldie Museum in Glarus commemorates the woman who was the last woman exposed to witchcraft in Switzerland.

Under torture, he admitted to using the powers of Satan. In 1782, a court in Glarus sentenced Anna Goldie to death by sword for witchcraft. Allegation: The maid allegedly stuck a pin several times in the milk of one of her master’s daughters. The girl also hit the nails several times. Goldie’s death was the witches’ last legal execution and sparked outrage across Europe.

“The witch hunt is a dark chapter in human and Swiss history,” says the Federal Council. Yet, he has no interest in officially celebrating the victims of the witch hunts throughout Equality history. Others should do it, he said in response to an approach from the national environmental adviser Leonor Porchet (33).

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India and France discuss UN Security Council and reformed multilateralism https://imos-journal.net/india-and-france-discuss-un-security-council-and-reformed-multilateralism/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 20:02:25 +0000 https://imos-journal.net/india-and-france-discuss-un-security-council-and-reformed-multilateralism/ India and France have traditionally maintained close and friendly relations. New Delhi: India and France held consultations on the UN Security Council on Tuesday and agreed to enhance ongoing cooperation within the multilateral platform on issues of mutual concern, according to the statement issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Prakash Gupta, Joint Secretary (UN-Political) […]]]>

India and France have traditionally maintained close and friendly relations.

New Delhi:

India and France held consultations on the UN Security Council on Tuesday and agreed to enhance ongoing cooperation within the multilateral platform on issues of mutual concern, according to the statement issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Prakash Gupta, Joint Secretary (UN-Political) led the Indian delegation, including officials from the Indian Embassy in Paris. Meanwhile, the French delegation was led by Ambassador Fabien Penone, Director of the Department of International Organizations, Human Rights and Francophonie of the Ministry of Europe and Foreign Affairs (MEAE) of France, as well as other senior officials.

“In line with the India-France strategic partnership, the two sides had an in-depth exchange of views on various thematic and country-specific issues on the agenda of the UN Security Council. The two sides agreed to strengthen their ongoing cooperation within the multilateral platform on issues of mutual interest, including counter-terrorism, United Nations peacekeeping and reformed multilateralism,” the statement read.

The two sides had briefed each other on their priorities during the upcoming French and Indian presidencies of the UNSC in September and December 2022, respectively. They also had discussions on initiatives around the High Level Week of the upcoming 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly in September 2022, the statement added.

India and France have traditionally maintained close and friendly relations. In 1998, the two countries entered into a strategic partnership that is emblematic of their convergence of views on a range of international issues outside of a close and growing bilateral relationship.

The two countries maintain flourishing economic relations. French companies and industry have forged links with the Indian economy and contribute significantly to our goal of becoming an Atmanirbhar Bharat.

There are more than 1000 French companies in India in various sectors such as defence, ITES, consultancy, engineering services, heavy industry, etc. France is the 7th foreign investor in India with a cumulative stock of FDI of 9 billion dollars from April 2, 2000 to December 2020, which represents 2% of total FDI inflows into India.

Although India has a trade surplus, bilateral India-France trade remains well below its potential. During the period April 2018-March 2019, India-France bilateral trade stood at €11.59 billion, India’s exports to France were valued at €6.23 billion while French exports to India amounted to 5.35 billion euros.

The 18th meeting of the Joint Economic Committee, which was held virtually between the two countries on November 27, 2020, led to the signing of a bilateral “fast track mechanism” for investors. The first meetings took place on February 16, 2022 between E/I, Paris and the French Treasury and on February 25, 2022 between the Secretary, DPIIT and the French Ambassador, respectively in Paris and Delhi.

Trade and Industry Minister Shri Piyush Goyal also hosted a virtual conference for French companies in February 2021, during which a dedicated desk was set up by Invest India for investor queries. In recent interactions at the EU level, India has sought an early trade deal, while working towards a full FTA.

(Except for the title, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

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